BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Innovation's Dirty Little Secret: Why Serial Innovators Succeed Where Others Fail

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    This book provides some good common sense advice for leaders in

    This book provides some good common sense advice for leaders in the corporate and church world. Thus, pastors can learn from this book. But there is a caveat. I write this review as one who served as a former military officer and currently serving as pastor. At times I am uncomfortable with some of the language that is used because it can draw attention away from the true nature of the Church.

    The good sections in this book regard the “business” end of leading in the church. Thus, most of the ideas are corporate oriented, very practical and useful. From that perspective, Chapter “Have and Exit Strategy” and “Why Vision Matters” are most useful for church leaders. Chapter questions focus the reader on application.

    Observing pastors for many years, I find that when we plan something, it is obviously the best, maybe “God’s will.” But such presumption can not only hinder current plans for the church, it can blind us to faulty logic and dead ends. 

    “Have an Exit Strategy” offers a planning alternative to avoid dead ends and cramping future plans in church activity. The best advice is the subsection: “Never Make a Change When You Can Conduct an Experiment.” As the author notes, “Unfortunately, this is a hard concept for many leaders and organizations to grasp” (p. 35).

    Another helpful insight comes in the “Igniting Innovation” section, namely the difference between artistic and organizational innovation. “The unfortunate byproduct is confusion: it encourages leaders and organizations to take risks and behave in ways that are perfectly appropriate for artists, but foolhardy for leaders of organizations” (p. 44). Thus, something looks flashy, innovative, challenging may not be the solution for the pastor, church leaders. Good advice for church leaders.

    Part 4 (“Sabotaging Innovation”) in the book shows the negative aspects of leadership pitfalls and failure. Sometimes in churches we are blind to the destructive effects of leadership failures. One of the weaknesses of the chapter is that the focus is on failure, but within the Church, there is another critical factor: forgiveness and restoration. This does not excuse or worse encourage leadership failures, but it is the heart of what the Church is. Interestingly in contrast the Part on Breakout Decisions highlights that the “two new keys to reaching the current culture: authenticity and compassion” (p. 125). 

    The “Champion” mentality seems to contradict the earlier advice: avoid the “curse of hype” (pp. 90ff.). As for pastors serving congregations, this book leaves a gap in leadership. Hence my recommendation is a qualified good read. Because… the business side of decision making (even mission statements and vision statements) consumes the the reader’s attention. Much good insights for leaders. So, for the reader, enjoy, learn, but keep that secondary to that which is most important.

    Thanks to Zondervan for a preview copy for an unbiased review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2013

    I am raising and educating my children, and that often requires

    I am raising and educating my children, and that often requires a certain level of innovation: if something’s not working, I’ve got to change it. Learning to innovate, to think outside the box, is an important skill for homeschooling moms.

    However, there is one fact about innovation that the success gurus never mention: most innovation leads to failure. Larry Osborn, a very innovative church leader, knows this and has written Innovation’s Dirty Little Secret: Why Serial Innovators Succeed Where Others Fail to explain how to increase your chances for successful innovation. ...For business, non-profits, and even church and family life, Innovation’s Dirty Little Secret has many helpful ideas about people and change. However, even though the author is a pastor, I cannot recommend his attitude for churches and families. Read my complete review at Tea Time with Annie Kate

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1