BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

The Innovator's Solution: Creating and Sustaining Successful Growth

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2005

    Packed with Knowledge!

    The dilemma for top-ranking companies is that by doing all of the things that lead to success, they may doom themselves to failure. Disruptive innovations typically debut at the low end of the market or among nonusers, as unprofitable, unpromising and crude products, in comparison to the mainstream standards. Then, established companies make the understandable mistake of ignoring them, only to be overtaken from below. Author Clayton M. Christensen¿s previous classic, `The Innovator¿s Dilemma¿, identified this problem. This subsequent book offers a solution by helping managers identify potentially disruptive innovations, correctly read the market and the competitive environment, and develop a response. This book is not quite as innovative or provocative as its predecessor, but it is a valuable extension of Christensen¿s theory. If you want to know what your company can do about this serious competitive problem, we recommend this solid follow-up.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 20, 2010

    Great Book.

    One of the best on strategy in large corporations

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2007

    Disruptive Innovations Key to Spicing Up Competition

    Clayton Christensen and Michael Raynor set the tone immediately by showing that most companies cannot sustain growth and by explaining to readers how stock markets factor in growth in the price of any publicly-traded stock. Growing faster than what stock markets see now and expect in the future is essential to move up a stock price. The resource allocation process is the key culprit in humbling many market leaders when dealing with disruptive innovations. That process typically invites up-market flight rather than head-to-head fight with new market entrants. That flight mechanism is applicable not only to product/service makers, but also to their distributors and retailers. Unlike a sustaining innovation, a disruptive innovation is not compatible with the business model of market leaders. Christensen and Raynor call this behavioral pattern asymmetric motivation. The way out of asymmetric motivation is for the leadership of an established player 1. to frame the disruptive innovation as a threat during the resource allocation process and 2. to shift responsibility for the project to an autonomous organization that has the relevant experience to frame it as an opportunity. The leadership needs to have a clear understanding of the respective impact of resources, processes, and values on what an organization can or cannot accomplish. Resources and processes are often enablers while values often represent constraints. Unlike deliberate processes, emergent processes should dominate when the future is hard to predict and the right strategy is not yet clear. That is especially true at the beginning of a company¿s existence. Once the winning strategy becomes clear, deliberate processes become a must to maximize the changes of success. Christensen and Raynor continue their analysis by sub-dividing disruptive innovations into two categories: new-market disruptions competing with ¿non-consumption¿ and low-end disruptions that go after the proverbial ¿low-hanging fruit.¿ Charting the upward path for a new-market disruption is more daunting because nobody has ever walked the walk. In practice, the distinction between the two types of disruptive innovations is not always clear-cut due to the existence of hybrid disruptions that combine new-market and low-end approaches. Christensen and Raynor also point out that an innovation that passes the new-market or low-end test must be disruptive to all of the significant established players to deserve the label of disruptive innovation. Christensen and Raynor clearly show that new entrants in turn do not escape from the up-market urge. After driving out the last established market player competing in a certain market segment, cut-throat competition forces new entrants to also move up market for greener pastures. Christensen and Raynor also reflect on why an overwhelming majority of new products fail miserably in the market-place. Attribute-based segmentation for which data are often available is the lead explanation for these failures. That type of market segmentation too often ignores the jobs that people and companies need to get done and how a product or service can be ¿hired¿ for that purpose. Targeting a product or service at the circumstances in which the target audience finds itself, rather than at the target itself is the key to success. Christensen and Raynor drive that point home very well with their story about the milkshake doing a different job for a bored commuter and his/her child at different times of the day. Christensen and Raynor blame the counterproductive attribute-based segmentation to 1. fear of focus, 2. senior executives¿ demand for quantification of opportunities, 3. the structure of channels, and 4. advertising economics and brand strategies. Christensen and Raynor pursue their analysis by looking at the traditional distinction between core and non-core competences. Unlike competitiveness that is focused on what a customer values,

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2004

    One of the best business books I have ever read

    Clearly written, the book integrates good theory with examples and case analysis from the past, present, and future. This book will revolutionize how strategy is formulated. But I recommend reading the Innovator's Dilemma first. If you want to read just a few good business books that actually help, read this one, along with the Innovator's Dilemma and 'All the Right Moves' from London Business School profesor Constantinos Markides.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2003

    My boss is wild about this book - everyone is getting it for Christmas!

    I ordered this for my boss. He read it Tgiving weekend and had one of the assistants buy him 5 more on the following Monday. We're now buying 25 more for senior management, plus another 10 for our board of directors! Gift giving will be easy this year!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2003

    A must for product developers

    Christensen and Raynor explain how innovation can be a predictable process that delivers sustainable and profitable growth. They identify the forces that cause managers to make bad decisions and present their ideas and a new framework to help product developers to create the right conditions, at the right time, for a disrupting-technology to succeed in the company and the market. They provide real-life examples from many different companies that sustain their claims. This is a book that you would really enjoy and the most important thing are the strategies that you can apply in your own project.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2003

    Another Essential Read

    Clayton Christensen has created another essential read for understanding the central issues facing the survival of corporations today. It should take its place on your bookshelf along side Christensen's first book ('Innovator's Dilemma'), Foster's 'Creative Destruction', and Watts' 'Slingshot Syndrome: Why America's Leading Technology Firms Fail at Innovation'. All highly recommended.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1