Customer Reviews for

The Intelligent Investor

Average Rating 4
( 90 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Invest In This Book, Invest In Yourself

With more than one million copies sold and an endorsement on the cover by Warren Buffet, you know there has to be something to this book- and I think I know why. Simply because it is the first book ever to describe the emotional framework and analytical tools necessary ...
With more than one million copies sold and an endorsement on the cover by Warren Buffet, you know there has to be something to this book- and I think I know why. Simply because it is the first book ever to describe the emotional framework and analytical tools necessary for financial success for individual investors.

Probably the single best book on investing written for the lay-public and the stock market bible since its first appearance in 1949, it's a great resource, although it's quite a thick book and filled with detail- and probably not for anybody but the serious stock market investor. And if getting motivated to start investing is your problem, suggest The Sixty-Second Motivator. Good luck!

posted by 246790 on October 27, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

Not what I thought

If you want to read Ben Graham's Intelligent Investor, try the original without the Zweig commentary. The commentary often contradicts Graham's philosophy, and at best, confuses everything. The Graham part is loaded with useful advice that has years of practical exper...
If you want to read Ben Graham's Intelligent Investor, try the original without the Zweig commentary. The commentary often contradicts Graham's philosophy, and at best, confuses everything. The Graham part is loaded with useful advice that has years of practical experience behind it, but the Zweig advice is the typical financial crap found in any current periodical. My advice - don't buy this watered down version of the Intelligent Investor - buy the real thing.

posted by Anonymous on May 23, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2008

    Not what I thought

    If you want to read Ben Graham's Intelligent Investor, try the original without the Zweig commentary. The commentary often contradicts Graham's philosophy, and at best, confuses everything. The Graham part is loaded with useful advice that has years of practical experience behind it, but the Zweig advice is the typical financial crap found in any current periodical. My advice - don't buy this watered down version of the Intelligent Investor - buy the real thing.

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Invest In This Book, Invest In Yourself

    With more than one million copies sold and an endorsement on the cover by Warren Buffet, you know there has to be something to this book- and I think I know why. Simply because it is the first book ever to describe the emotional framework and analytical tools necessary for financial success for individual investors. <BR/><BR/>Probably the single best book on investing written for the lay-public and the stock market bible since its first appearance in 1949, it's a great resource, although it's quite a thick book and filled with detail- and probably not for anybody but the serious stock market investor. And if getting motivated to start investing is your problem, suggest The Sixty-Second Motivator. Good luck!

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2008

    Zweig needs NOT to write in this book

    I mean come on, Graham wrote this book!! Plus, its probably the most influential book he has written in his career. But lets get the facts straight, he wrote the original version. The updated version that has been revised by Zweig should have never been released. I am currently half way through the book and im not going to stop now, but I do wish I would have started with the original version. Zweig is too critical and conservative to start trying to undermine the concepts behind Graham. In Chapter 11, under security analysis 'should be one of the most influential chapters in the book' Zweig makes a sidenote that explains Warren Buffet's methodology of investment is too risky so all individual investors should go with a market index fund. A market index fund? Come on dude, you act like your talking to a 13 year old who is looking to invest his Bar Mitvah money. Let's get real on the subject and stop trying to go against Graham's methods of valuing an individual stock. Especially in his own book!!!! Jeez. I encourage all investors to read the original version of Intelligent Investor, and I will also suggest that Jason Zweig sticks to writing for Money magazine.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2007

    a reviewer

    This classic book on investing belongs on the bookshelf of every investor. The principles that Benjamin Graham outlines are the very precepts that guided such great investors as Warren Buffett, and such mutual fund innovators as John Bogle, the noted Vanguard Group founder, who wrote this edition's foreword. First published in 1949, the text shows a few signs of age, most notably in its discussion of interest rates, investment vehicles such as savings bonds and other time-sensitive subjects. However, those are minor issues. When Benjamin Graham writes about categories of investors, approaches to security analysis, the proper disposition investors should have toward market moves, and other fundamental investment subjects, his advice is timeless. We highly recommend this seminal book.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2010

    Pure, Unadulterated, Classic Graham

    One might wonder, why (s)he should read a book on investing written in 1949. How would such a thing be relevant to today's stock market? How much of it would still apply to 2010? Just about all of it. Graham started his Wall Street career in 1914, and was all but wiped out in the infamous 1929-32 mother of all bear markets, a painful experience from which he learned many important lessons. He says that, just as information relating to securities in 1914 would make strange reading in 1949, so would information in the first edition of his book make strange reading today. However, the information relating to bull and bear markets, the nature of the stock market as a whole and the insane behavior of investors will all remain the same, without end, Amen. Also, he warns, you must have a knowledge of stock market history, and what better way to get one than a book written originally in 1949 with periodic updates ending in 1973? Graham does not talk like he is some sort of a Wall Street prophet (which actually he was). He does not sermonize, he does not admonish, he does not accuse. But he does make a crystal clear definition of the "intelligent" investor: that it is more a trait of character than of the brain. He states that many who have brought great intellect (in the non-Graham definition) and enthusiasm to investing have ended up bust in the end, as they acted just like all the other little lemmings jumping suicidally together off of the cliff that is Wall Street. You can have a stratospheric IQ and a Harvard degree and still be mentally retarded by Graham's definition. Do not expect "The Intelligent Investor" to be some sort of a "how to make a million on Wall Street" book. He talks of the "defensive investor" who must expect adequate and gradual returns out of his or her investments; and of the "enterprising investor" who will make a little bit more than their defensive counterpart, not because his or her IQ is higher, or they bought risky growth stocks, but only because of the extra effort and research brought to the table. Even the enterprising investor must not expect to make gargantuan returns, sadly, and Graham is just being a realist. Try swinging for the fences on every pitch and you'll end up like those lemmings I mentioned. The only confusion I have over the 1949 edition of the Intelligent Investor, is the question of FOR WHOM this book was written. As Bogle says in the forward, the trading volume on the Big Board was 2,000,000 shares per day. That is about how many Americans actually owned stock in the 40's and 50's, most of which were of above average means and wealth. So maybe he was only expecting to print 2 million copies?? For whomever this book was originally intended, it applies to ALL OF US who want to invest in stocks and bonds and other investment vehicles, even if the Big Board traded 2 BILLION shares yesterday and 90 million Americans own stock or mutual funds in 2010. Let's just hope those 90 million Americans have read Graham. Or maybe not: he says you can profit off of their insanity. So much for the better.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    WRITTEN TO LEGITIMIZE STOCK iNVESTING DURING THE DEPRESSION

    Mr. Graham was writing to re-legitimize long term stock investing after a period of economic chaos. The book is a classic and will be on any serious investors shelf. This man would be the logical counterpoint to a writer like Joseph Livermore, who was geared more to stock speculators.

    Those two writers are the Polar Opposites of the current advice on the market. It is good advice, I have made money off of both writers and they have more than paid for themselves.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great read, essential for both the beginner and expert investor

    The Intelligent Investor is an essential reference book to have within your investing repertoire. The insights provided are both timeless and highly relevant in this fluctuating market and the added update sections help even the most novice investor understand how to translate Graham's teachings into everyday practicality. I read this book during business school and continue to re-visit it every so often when I am looking for new ways to alter my portfolio. I hope that everyone can enjoy this book as much as I have.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2005

    Applying shopping philosophy to investing

    Ben Graham wrote the book on it... literally! What do you look for when shopping for anything? Something that fits your needs, has the style/color/etc you want, and combines the best of quality and price. This is effectively what Mr. Graham is outlining in his book, but he goes on to explain HOW to look at a company/stock/bond to determine if in fact it is that combination of quality and price. He teaches you how to shop for investments by showing you what to look for, not just in the stock/bond, but in the underlying company that the investment reflects. While his writing style took me about 50 pages to get the feel of, it was more an adjustment of mindset than anything. The commentary by Jason Zweig gives relavent modern examples of a book that spans decades, yet is still relavent today.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2014

    Jack

    "I just dont know how to feel about humanity." He confessed

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2014

    River

    "I'm pretty sure no one does. It's a hard topic to decide where you stand." She replied.

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  • Posted December 11, 2013

    A must read for every investor

    This book is still relevant after all of these years. It is a must read for every investor and should be for every college student majoring in finance.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2013

    Highly Recommended.

    Graham's book will always be relevant to new investors. Jason Zweig's commentaries add much value with the supplementary information from more recent events. The principles are working for me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2013

    his was given to me by my boyfriend and by far still one of the

    his was given to me by my boyfriend and by far still one of the best books about stock trading for the long and safe term. :) Another good pick for guides on financial goals. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2013

    Don't do the stock market until you read this book.

    I made many mistakes before reading this book and understanding "Mr. Market" as Graham calls it. It gets detailed, which is admirable when you are dealing with a detailed subject, but it is also a delight to read and gives the reader many valuable insights into the workings of the market. It changed my way of "investing" and also has made me a bunch of money - which is what this book is about.

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  • Posted February 22, 2013

    A good edition of a classic

    This is a must read for the aspiring investor. It only loses a star because of oddities in the Nook Book's formatting and the dated commentary chapters. It seems ironic to ding commentary that's ten years out of date for a book from the 70s, but that's honestly how it seemed. Graham's advice is timeless, but the commentator's advice leans more towards advice for the year 2002. Still plenty of good examples there, but Graham's writing has a voice that it lacks.

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  • Posted July 7, 2011

    Great book

    I have found the book easy to read.Like how things are simplified and puts in real examples of fiasco of the techbuble.just dont like the tools as much that they provide along with reading on the nook.

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  • Posted June 9, 2011

    Great Book!

    This is a classic. I highly recommend it to people who want to get into investing the right way.

    The writing is a little dense if you're not used to the lingo but once you get used to the wording, it's a great read.

    Graham explains investing through science and logic, not fuzzy thinking and feelings. Buy it if you want to improve your investing knowledge.

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  • Posted May 9, 2011

    Buy the physical book

    The book is great and I highly recommend it for novices and the self proclaimed investing gurus.

    My actual issue is with the Nook price being more expensive than the paperback. Of course this book is not unique in that sense, but this is the one I decided to purchase.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2010

    Ebook priced more than the paperback copy?

    The Ebook is priced almost $7.00 more than the paperback edition. I can see premium pricing when a book is first released but I'm paying more and getting less rights than with the paperback. Sorry not going to happen.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2010

    Old concepts still are on target

    Benjamin Graham was Warren Buffet's mentor and obviously his student made good use of his teachings. It is easy to read and lays out good basic concepts. The updated comments show the relevance to today's situation.

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