BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Into the Wild

Average Rating 4
( 851 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(396)

4 Star

(276)

3 Star

(107)

2 Star

(42)

1 Star

(30)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

19 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

Haunting

I think a person generally falls under two categories after reading this book: those that dismiss Chris McCandless as a nut, an idiot, an arrogant naive kid. And then those that see Chris McCandless as a hero of sorts, a person to greatly admire. I fall into the latter ...
I think a person generally falls under two categories after reading this book: those that dismiss Chris McCandless as a nut, an idiot, an arrogant naive kid. And then those that see Chris McCandless as a hero of sorts, a person to greatly admire. I fall into the latter category, but not because I think he was infallible. I acknowledge his faults, but I find so much to admire about the journey he undertook and the courage he had to make his dreams happen. Krakauer's writing is arresting, absorbing, you feel like you are right there with the figures in the story. I say "story" loosely because this is not a work of fiction. Chris's family is out there, still grieving over the enormous pain he left for them to endure. That this is a true story that happened not long ago makes it all the more haunting. It stayed with me months after reading it. There will be those that brush off this story with cynicism. But at the heart, this is a story about a young man who would settle for nothing less than the full realization of his dreams - to go out into the wild alone and challenge himself against God and nature. I would say this book changed my life. It woke me up and made me realize I wasn't living my life to the fullest. Thank you Mr. Krakauer for this masterpiece.

posted by fleurfairy on February 10, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

12 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

His defenders make the stupidest arguments

First of all I've become quite insulted by the way his defenders try to belittle people who find his story critical. One such reviewer said that most people who view McCandless negatively are in grade 8 and do not understand the meaning of life. The truth is, most peopl...
First of all I've become quite insulted by the way his defenders try to belittle people who find his story critical. One such reviewer said that most people who view McCandless negatively are in grade 8 and do not understand the meaning of life. The truth is, most people who critisize McCandless have a deep respect for life which is why we would never trek into a dangerous environment with intentionally no provisions and not even bother to call our families to see how were doing. So who are people who remain critical of McCandless's story? I'll give you a portrait. One such man is a TV producer. He 30, married with a baby daughter. He is adventurous: he came to Canada from Serbia. He plans someday to visit Antartica. He values his life and the lives of people around him. He has made an independent name for himself. That is the portrait of someone who critisizes McCandless. Chances are the most who admkire him are under 25 and have never been to a children's cancer ward. Anyway, let's get to the book. The book seeks to glorify and render the actions of what can only be described as a troubled youth. Chris was not out to become independent and adventurous. And his story in no way relates to that of the author. First of all, lots of youth want to become independent and explore the world. But I don't find anything independent about a boy who doesn't work and depends on the kindness of strangers to survive. Secondly, this was not a young man on a great adventure. This was a suicide mission. Most young people, including myself, set off on adventures to get back alive. We make plans to survive the environment we trek into. This was boy who went into the Alaskan tundra without shelter, without food and without a map to find his way out. Is that adventurous or suicidal? The author is romantisizing a angry and self-destructive youth. This not a healthy message for young people who think that they are above nature and everyone they love around them. For the story of a truly heroic, independent and adventurous young man who truly valued life, consider a read about Terry Fox.

posted by Anonymous on March 13, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 855 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 43
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2010

    speaks to the desire for freedom from humanity's B.S

    No real lessons learned here, but for those who have found themselves thrown in with this thing that calls itself humanity, and find that their crude and cruel nature make them feel an outcast and leave them with the desire to separate from the human race anyway possible.....they understand. Personally I don't think he was that disappointed with the outcome of the decision he made. He couldn't submit to societies level of nonsense and the jerks who promote it (like all the rest of us spineless cowards do). Ultimately he achieved what he was searching for.......Freedom from the BS that is humanity. For all of you who criticize him...... all I can say is at least he doesn't have to put up with you, your B.S. or people like you anymore. Hopefully he has found a place that doesn't stink of ignorance, violence, self love, and material worship as planet earth does. Man, I here ya Chris.

    19 out of 35 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 10, 2010

    Haunting

    I think a person generally falls under two categories after reading this book: those that dismiss Chris McCandless as a nut, an idiot, an arrogant naive kid. And then those that see Chris McCandless as a hero of sorts, a person to greatly admire. I fall into the latter category, but not because I think he was infallible. I acknowledge his faults, but I find so much to admire about the journey he undertook and the courage he had to make his dreams happen. Krakauer's writing is arresting, absorbing, you feel like you are right there with the figures in the story. I say "story" loosely because this is not a work of fiction. Chris's family is out there, still grieving over the enormous pain he left for them to endure. That this is a true story that happened not long ago makes it all the more haunting. It stayed with me months after reading it. There will be those that brush off this story with cynicism. But at the heart, this is a story about a young man who would settle for nothing less than the full realization of his dreams - to go out into the wild alone and challenge himself against God and nature. I would say this book changed my life. It woke me up and made me realize I wasn't living my life to the fullest. Thank you Mr. Krakauer for this masterpiece.

    19 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2008

    Into The Wild

    This book had a very powerful underlying message. For Chris it wasn't about going into the Alaskan wilderness with all of his loving posessions. He was seeking answers about where he was in his life and what it meant. I felt a strong connection to Chris in many ways. I feel that I have the same strong will and guts of steel that he posessed. Jon Krakauer kept me intently flipping the pages as I learned the story of Chris McCandless.

    16 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 13, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Inspiring story about letting go of the daily grind and giving u

    Inspiring story about letting go of the daily grind and giving up everything to taste life in the wilderness. At it's heart, into the wild, like every adventure, is a spiritual quest for life's true meaning. Wonderful book and movie.

    14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2007

    His defenders make the stupidest arguments

    First of all I've become quite insulted by the way his defenders try to belittle people who find his story critical. One such reviewer said that most people who view McCandless negatively are in grade 8 and do not understand the meaning of life. The truth is, most people who critisize McCandless have a deep respect for life which is why we would never trek into a dangerous environment with intentionally no provisions and not even bother to call our families to see how were doing. So who are people who remain critical of McCandless's story? I'll give you a portrait. One such man is a TV producer. He 30, married with a baby daughter. He is adventurous: he came to Canada from Serbia. He plans someday to visit Antartica. He values his life and the lives of people around him. He has made an independent name for himself. That is the portrait of someone who critisizes McCandless. Chances are the most who admkire him are under 25 and have never been to a children's cancer ward. Anyway, let's get to the book. The book seeks to glorify and render the actions of what can only be described as a troubled youth. Chris was not out to become independent and adventurous. And his story in no way relates to that of the author. First of all, lots of youth want to become independent and explore the world. But I don't find anything independent about a boy who doesn't work and depends on the kindness of strangers to survive. Secondly, this was not a young man on a great adventure. This was a suicide mission. Most young people, including myself, set off on adventures to get back alive. We make plans to survive the environment we trek into. This was boy who went into the Alaskan tundra without shelter, without food and without a map to find his way out. Is that adventurous or suicidal? The author is romantisizing a angry and self-destructive youth. This not a healthy message for young people who think that they are above nature and everyone they love around them. For the story of a truly heroic, independent and adventurous young man who truly valued life, consider a read about Terry Fox.

    12 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2010

    Not as Good as Into Thin Air

    I was hoping this book would be similar to Into Thin Air in that you couldn't put it down. I could. The beginning and end were good, but the middle dragged on. Interesting story but will probably not re-read or recommend it to too many people.

    9 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 2, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    marching to your own beat

    this book is for anyone who belives you don't have to follow the crowd. for anyone who has an imiganation and has desired to explore life "outside the box".

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Currently Reading Into The Wild

    Okay so a friend of mine saw the movie, and said it was pretty great. So silly me; thought books are usually better than the movie so I'll start there.BAD decision. I must admit that I skipped about 20 - 30 pages once I got to the middle of the book; I found them extremely hard to read for a lack of relevance. I don't care about the author's story, I didn't buy this book to read about you, and how you think your story relates to that of Chris. Aside from that going solely on his telling of Chris' story I find the book to be fairly interesting. I'm not fond of Jon's writing style, I believe that if he had written it in a different way more readers would have been able to enjoy Chris' story, and perhaps be a little less critical of him. Don't get me wrong, Chris has done some pretty crazy and at times insensitive things (remember I'm still reading the book); still his story could be a great one. You don't have to agree with what he did or how he went about it to enjoy, relate to, feel for his story.
    So I'm just hoping that I'm able to finish reading Into the Wild so that I may finally be able to enjoy and feel for Chris' story.

    5 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    Amazing book

    I loved this book, you could literally feel the emotion when you read it and its touching. This is definitely my favorite, it's inspired me in so many ways, His love for the wild and just wanting to escape society was a no news flash cause there's people now wanting to do the same. The story of Christopher McCandless is a great story to tell and this book narrows his adventure down. Of course I would recommend this to anyone it's great and you will not be disappointed.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2001

    Not That Good

    I am in 8th Grade and I read this book I didn't like it because who in the world would come up here to Ak and go out into the wilderness not knowing what they are doing and try to survive on their own.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    The Death of An Innocent

    Innocent. Young. Brilliant. Visionary. Complicated. Stubborn. Christopher Johnson McCandless¿s personality was enriched with all of these characteristics. John Krakauer¿s novel Into the Wild, tells the tale of this unorthodox young man as he departs on a hitchhiking voyage across the country, to the desolate area of northern Mt. McKinley. Immediately after graduating with honors from Emory University, McCandless leaves behind all his parents¿ ambition, most of his possessions, and his twenty-four thousand dollar savings to charity. He invents a new life for himself, and presents the determination of finding a raw and conceptual adventure. His family does not know what has become of him until, in 1992, a group of hunters discovered his starved and decomposed corpse. Krakauer pursued many of the individuals that interacted with McCandless, researched journal entries, postcards, and photographs, and even interrupts the story with his own youth narratives, to obtain a view on the controversy that the public generated on the different motives and psychological state of McCandless¿s mind. This exposure into the deeper meanings of his intentions satisfied the hunger and attraction that Krakauer and many other individuals developed when they heard McCandless¿s story. The author expressed many underlying discoveries as well, like the fascination that American minds have with nature, the excitement of risky actions young men feel, and the effects of father-son bonds as he journeyed through the life of McCandless. Into the Wild displayed the excitement of adventure, and used it to tell a real-life event. Anyone who likes adventure, drama, or philosophizing would enjoy reading this book. It is a fantastic change to read something that makes everyone think, and establish different opinions throughout the story. Krakuaer¿s novel provides a scoop of reality along with the pull that fiction has on readers. It also included little details that made an impact on what Krakauer was trying to convey to his audience. However, those who like to become truly engrossed in a book may fail to locate that in Into the Wild. It fell just short of being an amazing book due to a lack of construction in the plot, and having that certain surprise that hooks the reader. There was no ¿giving away the ending,¿ or even ¿emotion that touches the soul.¿ One must remember though that Into the Wild is a non-fiction book, and overall, a great one at that.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2013

    Glad I didn't buy this

    This book was a gift. It's the story of an immature kid who decides to ignore all warnings and common sense and heads to Alaska to get killed by bears.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 10, 2011

    live near the bus

    i live fairly close to where he did and somewhat from alaska....its a great book regardless of how nieve he was....loved the book

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 21, 2010

    A Book Worth Reading

    Although the story of Christopher McCandless, AKA Alexander Supertramp, is a tale known to many, this book takes it to a whole new level. After writing an article in Outsider Magazine about McCandless' untimely demise in the Alaskan wilderness, there was much controversy surrounding McCandless' mental state and motives. The author, Jon Krakauer tracks down and interviews many individuals McCandless interacted with during his years hitchhiking across the country. Through numerous interviews and letters, Krakauer strings together a synthetic Chris McCandless, a description with such depth the reader almost feels as if they knew the young man before his untimely death. Krakauer produces ruminations surrounding McCandless' motives and feelings while trekking across the country to fulfill his dream of a "Great Alaskan Odyssey." Insights surrounding McCandless' death change misconceptions surrounding his death, McCandless may not have been as ill-equipped for such an undertaking as may have been thought. The introduction and background given about McCandless make the beginning of the book very interesting, and although the bulk of the book, conveying McCandless' travels gets kind of repetitive, the book Is tied together nicely, recounting his death in the wild.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 8, 2010

    Hard to put down

    Very well written and researched. I found it very hard to put down.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Chris McCandless is Stupendous

    This is heart renching tale of a man who disownes his parents and leaves all of his belongings in the dust...literally. Chirstopher "Supertramp" McCandless is a lost soul who wonders into the valley of the lost minds. On the way he discovers who the real Chris is. Unfortunatly Chris becomes powerless against the wilderness and struggles for his life.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 10, 2010

    Highly Recomended

    Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer tells the hauntingly beautiful tale of young Chris McCandless' life as he leaves college, and all the aspirations of his family, behind to pursue a life of wandering. Following him around the country to some of the greatest landmarks America is blessed to posses, it chronicles his adventures through interviews, his own journals and photographs, and the letters and postcard he sent to those whom he held dear as he makes his way around America living, for the majority of his time, out of his backpack, with minimal money, the clothes on his back, and the brian in his head. It is masterfully written in both the first, second, and third person from the perspectives of many people, people he went to school with, lived with, stayed with, traveled with, and all whom he marked with his unique and bright mark. The book begins with the end in some cases, as the very first chapters chronicle his death, then jump back two years to his college graduation, the start of an odessey. This is why the book struck me so deeply, because for me it was a metaphor for life, that even when you are gone, the end for you may simply be the beginning for some other woul who will chase you to the ends of the Earth to find out your story. Also, I was struck by Chris himself, and how much he pushes himself, enduring hardships voluntarily that others woudl not dare to comprehend on their own. Into the Wild was a masterful art piece that should be cherished and read by every boy between the ages of 12 and 20 who has a free, wandering spirit.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 10, 2010

    Awesome book

    Jon Krakauer really did a swell job with this book Into the Wild. He had extensive research and interviewed the McCandless family. The book was great from beginning to end. The only downside I would see to this book is that the middle was dragging too much. I think Mr. Krakauer was trying to prove a point, but I started to get bored after Waterman and McCunn. In a way it made me read faster so I could get back to the part about Chris McCandless. I also liked how he had all those maps to show where Chris was on his trip. The best thing I found about this book was the many journal entries that Mr. Krakauer added to the book to show us exactly how Chris was feeling and what his thoughts were. I also liked the little passages that started every chapter. It must've taken a ton of effort and perseverance to take all those little passages and put them in the right chapter. Jon Krakauer has done quality research that makes this book both interesting and accurate. I highly recommend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 14, 2010

    An incredible read!!!!

    This is a book that will keep you one the edge of your seat. It's a great book to discuss! I would HIGHLY recommend reading it. This book is thought provoking in every sense of the term and makes you question your own life. It makes you question the steps that you have taken in your own life in order to achieve something. Read this book! You won't regret it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2010

    HORRIBLE!!!

    This was one of the WORST books I ever bought!!! I was pushing myself to finish it and never did!!! I would NEVER, EVER recommend this book!!

    1 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 855 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 43