Customer Reviews for

Into the Wild

Average Rating 4
( 841 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(389)

4 Star

(276)

3 Star

(104)

2 Star

(42)

1 Star

(30)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

19 out of 34 people found this review helpful.

speaks to the desire for freedom from humanity's B.S

No real lessons learned here, but for those who have found themselves thrown in with this thing that calls itself humanity, and find that their crude and cruel nature make them feel an outcast and leave them with the desire to separate from the human race anyway possibl...
No real lessons learned here, but for those who have found themselves thrown in with this thing that calls itself humanity, and find that their crude and cruel nature make them feel an outcast and leave them with the desire to separate from the human race anyway possible.....they understand. Personally I don't think he was that disappointed with the outcome of the decision he made. He couldn't submit to societies level of nonsense and the jerks who promote it (like all the rest of us spineless cowards do). Ultimately he achieved what he was searching for.......Freedom from the BS that is humanity. For all of you who criticize him...... all I can say is at least he doesn't have to put up with you, your B.S. or people like you anymore. Hopefully he has found a place that doesn't stink of ignorance, violence, self love, and material worship as planet earth does. Man, I here ya Chris.

posted by SampsonTD on December 2, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

10 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

His defenders make the stupidest arguments

First of all I've become quite insulted by the way his defenders try to belittle people who find his story critical. One such reviewer said that most people who view McCandless negatively are in grade 8 and do not understand the meaning of life. The truth is, most peopl...
First of all I've become quite insulted by the way his defenders try to belittle people who find his story critical. One such reviewer said that most people who view McCandless negatively are in grade 8 and do not understand the meaning of life. The truth is, most people who critisize McCandless have a deep respect for life which is why we would never trek into a dangerous environment with intentionally no provisions and not even bother to call our families to see how were doing. So who are people who remain critical of McCandless's story? I'll give you a portrait. One such man is a TV producer. He 30, married with a baby daughter. He is adventurous: he came to Canada from Serbia. He plans someday to visit Antartica. He values his life and the lives of people around him. He has made an independent name for himself. That is the portrait of someone who critisizes McCandless. Chances are the most who admkire him are under 25 and have never been to a children's cancer ward. Anyway, let's get to the book. The book seeks to glorify and render the actions of what can only be described as a troubled youth. Chris was not out to become independent and adventurous. And his story in no way relates to that of the author. First of all, lots of youth want to become independent and explore the world. But I don't find anything independent about a boy who doesn't work and depends on the kindness of strangers to survive. Secondly, this was not a young man on a great adventure. This was a suicide mission. Most young people, including myself, set off on adventures to get back alive. We make plans to survive the environment we trek into. This was boy who went into the Alaskan tundra without shelter, without food and without a map to find his way out. Is that adventurous or suicidal? The author is romantisizing a angry and self-destructive youth. This not a healthy message for young people who think that they are above nature and everyone they love around them. For the story of a truly heroic, independent and adventurous young man who truly valued life, consider a read about Terry Fox.

posted by Anonymous on March 13, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 845 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 43
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2010

    Very interesting read

    It is a great book to read if you love nature and you enjoy reading about other people's adventures. The stories were all well researched and the author has a very descriptive writing style.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Absolutely engrossing. This will haunt you for weeks after you finish it.

    This is a must read if you are into story lines that jerk you out of your element.To feel like you are along for the ride and witness all the emotional joys and terrors that this young man went through; wow. I loved the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 11, 2010

    Insightfulness to the max

    This book really opens up the eyes of the reader. By the time I finished it, I wanted to retreat from my current life and go on an Alaskan adventure myslef! It is easy to relate to because all of us go through times where we need to escape.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 14, 2010

    INto My wild

    This is a story of a young man born in California who left all his worldy possessions behind. His name was Alex Supertramp, and reinvented himself as Chris McCandless. He left his middle class family and a promising future. Gave his money to charity and burned the rest. He set out to find Alaska, with just a backpack and head full of dreams. He survived in seclusion, keeping a journal of his journies. Unfortunately, he died of starvation and was found in an abandoned bus. This book shows the inspiring story of a man who wanted to hinf himself. Some described him as impulsive and idiotic. I like to think of this book as a disturbing and interesting book. It inspires us all to look within ourselves and wonder if we are truly living our lives the way we want to.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 10, 2010

    Wonderfully written, Captivatingly emotional storyline

    Into the Wild is the emotional tale of a young man's two-year journey across the United States, from Atlanta, Georgia to Fairbanks, Alaska. When the book begins, we learn that the man's body was found dead in Alaska. The writer, Jon Krakauer, then spends the rest of the book uncovering and explaining what happened to Christopher Johnson McCandless.

    Many who have heard of Christopher McCandless only know of part of his journey, the end. However, in this book Krakauer describes his entire journey, from changing his name to Alexander Supertramp to working at McDonald's in Bullhead City, Arizona. Krakauer explains that McCandless stopped and stayed at other places before he made it to Alaska- completely changing his direction at one point by contemplating the idea of going south instead- following each and every one of his footsteps the entire way. Krakauer did an amazing job in writing and researching this piece. He took the time to sit down and talk to some of the people that Chris met and grew close to on his journey. Each person interviewed has first hand knowledge of the boy that adds to the intensity of the story, giving it a more realistic feel.

    Very few complaints can be made about this incredible book- the writing is excellent, the story itself is phenomenal, and the research Krakauer did for it is rather impressive- and if this were a book of Chris McCandless's story alone, it would be an astounding read. However, it must be noted that almost midway through the book, Krakauer gets off topic and goes into detail about the stories of three other men. He says that these men are comparable to McCandless, when the only parallel that can be made is that they all had a desire to be alone on an adventure in the wild. Krakauer also spends a considerable amount of time describing his own journey to climb a mountain; a section that feels like it was a copy and paste job from Krakauer's Into thin Air. It is not that these extra stories and accounts are uninteresting, but they take away from the intensity of the story. Additionally, while this story is detailed and descriptive, it is also non-conclusive. McCandless journey is explained in great detail, but it is never understood why Chris decided to do this. You never learn the reason behind this young man's decision to leave his life behind and go west.

    One may open Krakauer's book with no prior knowledge of McCandless or his journey and be just as captivated by this tale as someone who has researched the young man. With only the first paragraph, there is little reason to put the book down; Krakauer's descriptive writing gives life to the peculiar story. Jon Krakauer has written the entrancing story of Christopher Johnson McCandless magnificently well. This book's popularity will certainly be around for many more years to come.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Incredible Reveiw on Into The Wild

    Into The Wild is a captivating book with the main character Chris McCandless going through many things to survive on his own.
    Chris lived with his Mom and Dad. They were a middle to upperclass family. Chris was planning on going to college and ended up throwing it all away to live alone in the Alaskan Outback.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Complicated Read

    I'm not exactly certain how I feel about Jon Krakauer's book. It was obviously well researched and extremely well written. It didn't read like a dry scientific text or a blind affirmation of the passion of youth. It was almost simple; the story of a man who graduated with honors from Emory University, decided to renounce the material world, and lived as a constant rover.

    The wanderings of Chris McCandless, the son of a well-to-do family, eventually led him to the ultimate untamed landscape: Alaska. He trekked into the wilderness with only a few insubstantial tools and a ten pound bag of rice and expected to survive. He did not. His body was found by hunters in an abandoned bus. It was estimated that he died sometimes mid-August of 1992; two years after he set out on his odyssey.

    Jon Krakauer tackles a difficult true-life subject and takes the reader on a convulsive journey as he traces the final years of a young man fueled by the ideas of Thoreau and Tolstoy. I found myself admiring McCandless' fervent belief in a connection to nature and the evils of complacent society, then subsequently repulsed by his complete disregard of common sense and his family.

    One of the book's strongest features was the introductions to each chapter. Many are quotations on society or survival that were highlighted in the books McCandless treasured. Also, Krakauer pits McCandless' story against a tale from his own zealous youth. This account of his climb of the Devil's Thumb Mountain provides a perfect parallel to McCandless' struggle to survive in the wild Alaskan land.

    Ultimately, the bitter irony of Chris McCandless' death becomes the book's greatest affirmation of life. Before McCandless began his journey, before he died of starvation in the Alaskan wilderness, he donated $24,000 to an organization called Oxfam International; a charity dedicated to eradicating hunger in the world. Most would look at the story of Chris McCandless and dismiss it as the attempts of another freak to prove society's wrongs, but in Krakauer's hands it takes on a new and poignant account of a man who believed to fiercely and yearned too much.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Into the Wild (Maureen Bakis)

    Into the Wild is truely a riveting novel.A page turner, once you start you reading you will not put it down!I felt as though I was Chris McCandless struggling to survive on the fruits of nature. This story shows the true meaning of independence,endurance and capability. One doesn't realize how capable one's self is until one is in a position like Chris McCandless. Pushing yourself to your limits everyday, trying to survive solely on what nature has to offer. As long as oneself is in society there is a peer pressure and a set order of how to live. But being alone in the heartland of America depending on live animals for dinner is a whole different ball game. This story is highly recommended for anyone who enjoys a great adventure story. I promise you will be overly satisfied.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 14, 2009

    Mackenzi E. in McIntyers 4th english 4.2009

    I do not usually read non-fiction books. I thought this book was confusing because it kept going back and forth from the past the the present. The author did some amazing research to find out how Chris McCandless spent his final days. He interviewed a bunch of people to see where and why Chris went before he went to Alaska. This was not my favorite book and i liked the movie alot better. :)

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2008

    Into The wild Eric D. 10-24-08

    I personally think that the book, Into the Wild, by Jon Krakauer is a very good one. It is the story of a young man named Chris McCandless, who is from an upper middle class family. Despite this, he donates all of his money to charity and wanders around the country, hitchhiking to different destinations. He has an ultimate goal of going to Alaska to survive in the wilderness. The strongest trait of this book is that it is very well researched down to the smallest details. It is also very interesting, and it really makes you think. The only bad thing about this book is that sometimes it gets really off topic. Eventually, though, it always gets back on topic to complete the story. Other then this minor flaw it is a really, really good book, and I would definitely recommend it for anyone who likes this type of story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2008

    Great story but too much extra!

    Into Thin Air was amazing but Into the Wild fell short! The story of Christopher McCandless is no doubt an amazing one but I feel that there is too much unnecessary 'filler' in this book. Krakauer continuously goes into stories of other adventurers. Granted this is to get a better understanding of Christopher's mind set but I found that I quickly became bored and had to skip over parts of the book just so I could finish it! Something which I rarely do.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2008

    A reviewer

    I'm not so sure how good it was for me to have read this book. I want to do what chris did. It's hard for me to explain the affect this book had on me... but I can tell you that it was very powerful.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2002

    Confused Young Man

    I didn't appreciate this story. I found Chris to be a person that wanted to avoid life and rebellion against...what???? He was un-prepared to live in the wild yet chose to go there. Read South and then read this book. South tells the story of 20+ men that survived in the wild for over 500 days. Into the Wild tells the story of a rich kid looking to avoid society.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2000

    Krakauer's least interresting book

    I discovered Jon Krakauer's book Into Thin Air while on my honeymoon. It happened that the IMAX film on Everest was showing in Charleston, SC. I bought the book and read it in 2 days. I then read Into the Wild the following day. Eiger Dreams came two days following. The story is about the most selfish person I've ever read about. While it was interresting to read the close encounters of McCandlesses adventures. The reader may forget the pain Chris McCandless caused his family, despite their past wrongdoings. Half of the book is about other likeminded romantics with little respect for the dangers of Alaska. I definitely recommend Krakauers other books, though.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2014

    Exciting yet Meaningful

    This story is set around 1992. Christopher (also known as Alex) is a young man who simply wants to be seperated from society. He did not connect to his family for two years. Chris hitchhikes to go to hus destination and usually, the drivers worry since Chris only carries a rifle and little bit of food source. He stays alive eating berries. 4 month after the most recent hitchhiking, Chris is found dead in a sleeping bag. People slowly find more and more details about what happened during the 4 month. People later on find out that Chris meets an old man. They build up a strong bond. The relatonship between an old man and Chris breaks when the old man leaves him. Into the Wild is such an interesting book, felt like crime investigation TV shows. The author did a great job describing the scenery. The author uses some exerpt from novels that nvolves wlderness sch a Jack london's White Fangs. This novel had perfect amount of suspension in the story. This book is recommended for advanced young readers, highschool students and adults. Review by Exia1003.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    Good but sad

    I have read several books by this author and all have been excellent. This is a sad story but well told and researched.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2014

    Excellente

    Very good and among my favorite books. I had to read this for freshman humanities, and i LOVE IT. LONG LIVE ALEXANDER SUPERTRAMP

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 16, 2014

    I definitely recommend reading this book! Has a good point behin

    I definitely recommend reading this book! Has a good point behind it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2014

    Get a free i pad

    Kiss your hand, post this three more times, then look under your pillow.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2014

    Need clan

    Robinsong10 moond nomate blue etes blac fer($0ry @eye docs drops in)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 845 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 43