Customer Reviews for

Invisible Man

Average Rating 4
( 201 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(103)

4 Star

(59)

3 Star

(21)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(14)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

To Be Seen

When I first began reading this book, I admit that it was almost overwhelming...so many pages. But as I continued I realized that the journey was necessary. It was a time that needed to be fully understood in all it's primal glory. Racism truly has permeated society. A ...
When I first began reading this book, I admit that it was almost overwhelming...so many pages. But as I continued I realized that the journey was necessary. It was a time that needed to be fully understood in all it's primal glory. Racism truly has permeated society. A great book and great read!

posted by Anonymous on September 1, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Really, NO Stars

Misleading. The abstract does not clarify if this is the real book or a "Cliff's Notes" issue. This is simply a Student synopsis for those who need assistance with the book. WHY have this avaiable if you do not sell the real eBook? Very disappointing.

posted by mrs_moo_2u on July 30, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2009

    Invisible man

    This was a good read. What a tremendous journey. This was read for a class. i have to be real honest in that I have really never read anything in this style. It was stimulating, and I found myself reading every chance I had. The invisibility that was portrayed and discovered had an impact on me as a person.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2008

    Great Book

    Not many books can change your perspective on the world around you, or make you look at situations differently, but Invisible Man is one of them. This is one of the greatest books written, and I advise everyone to read it. This is a rollercoaster read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2006

    invisible man

    Everyone should read the novel Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison because it contains many of the ideas concerning humanity thatwe tend to think we perfectly understand, but we truly don¿t understand. This novel is good for people who don¿t know much about the horrors of the African Americans during racism. The author portrays the novel with realism that actually brings back the issue of racism rack to life. Also, the author¿s use of vocabulary and method of storytelling is very appealing to readers. The author bases his story on a main character who is invisible to the people around him, but not in reality. The author doesn¿t give this main character a name, which actually makes the reader more anxious page after page to know what happened and wonder who the main character actually is. To be truly honest, when I first seen the book, I thought it was going to be a boring book because it looked very long. However, as they say, ¿Don¿t judge the book by it¿s cover.¿ When I began to read the book, I realized that it was the total opposite of what I have thought. The book was very interesting. No matter how the book was lengthy, I forgot about it¿s long length because of the enjoyment I had when reading the book. The appealing words of the author keep its readers in contact with the book, always wondering what will happen next in the story. One interesting idea about this book is when the author mentions the end of the story is in the beginning. The novel is focused on one particular character with no name, as I said before.In reading this book, you will find out that this character tends to be naïve, in which he never finds out who he really is until the end of the book. This character does not want to be seen by the white society around him. That is because of his color. In the prologue, the author mentions that the main character lives, without paying any rent, in a basement of an apartment that is strictly just for white people. This basement was shut off and forgotten about since the nineteenth century. He doesn¿t go until the dark so no one can see him. Once he was walking and unintentionally bumped into a white man. When he bumped into him, the man called him an insulting name. The invisible man forced him to apologize. However, the man disagreed and continued to curse at him. Then the main character started to beat him and again force him to apologize. After the character beats him and takes out a knife to kill him, he realizes that the man had not seen him. The man turns out to be sleep walking in a night mare. Regardless of being naïve, the main character was very intelligent. He was a very good speaker. Because of his good speech that he once gave at a conference, he earned a scholarship to the Negroes Community College. Because of his intelligence, he was chosen to become the driver for Mr. Norton, a white man working in a job that is high in rank. Instead of showing Mr. Norton the beautiful places in his community, the main character shows him the worst of the community. The main character is not doing that intentionally he just doesn¿t know what he was doing. As he drives by an old lay and a young girl who are both pregnant, Mr. Norton asks him to stop there. Mr. Norton finds out that both the old lady and her daughter were pregnant from the same person they were pregnant from Trueblood, the girl¿s father. After finding out what happened with that family, Mr. Norton doesn¿t feel good and asks the driver to buy him some whisky. Again the narrator takes him to the worst of the community, Golden Day. Mr. Norton gets injured in Golden Day. After Mr. Norton and the main character arrive back to the campus, the director of the college finds out what happened and gets very angry. The director, Dr. Bledsoe, decides to expel The main character from the college. However, what is his fault for being expelled from the college? He just stopped where Mr. Norton asked him to stop.Was he supposed to ignore him? It wa

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2005

    good book

    this book was among the best i read. i think that anyone interested in reading for fun should try this book. its a great book that changes a boy into a man, in my perspective. this would be ideal for someone to enjoy even if you dont really like to read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2002

    One Great African Novel

    This is a great book about a black boy who survives in a white world. The struggles that he went through is the same of my experience of today. Reading this book shows you the everyday life of many African Americans people, and what they go through in life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 18, 2013

    I wish I had read this book years ago. It is essential to the history of America.

    This book was so compelling that I had trouble not thinking about it at times when I was working, and I could hardly stop reading to go to sleep at night. I recommend it highly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2013

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  • Posted May 3, 2013

    The narrator is an African American man who has worked diligentl

    The narrator is an African American man who has worked diligently to become an integral member of a free society. He listens and follows instructions carefully so that he might learn how to join himself to this new equality. He even submits to humiliation from those in power in order to gain a college scholarship to a "state college for Negroes. "The narrator is academically successful and very positive about his future. He envisions using his learning and success to contribute to the betterment of society. Unfortunately, by following instructions and being truthful he unwittingly allows a white trustee of the college to see the reality of black life in the South. For this, his scholarship is rescinded and he is expelled. The college director is furious and says to him: "Why, the dumbest black bastard in the cotton patch knows that the only way to please a white man is to tell him a lie! What kind of an education are you getting around here?" The shamed and confused narrator packs his bags and moves to New York City. Here he plans to earn enough money so that he might return to college and again work toward that goal of true societal equality. The narrator's persuasive speaking style brings him to the attention of The Brotherhood, a mixed race group that purportedly champions equality for all. He becomes a Brotherhood spokesman and believes he has found likeminded individuals. Over time, the narrator again discovers that he is a pawn in a larger agenda that has nothing to do with equality or the betterment of society. It is at this point that the narrator decides to "hibernate" and disassociate himself from the chaotic and senseless society in which he has found himself. He is tired of trying to make a difference in a world in which the rules, and even truth, seem to change at the whim of the powerful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    Excellent book

    Excellent book!

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  • Posted July 30, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Foundational America Novel

    One of the most entertaining but still profound American novels, "The Invisible Man" was good to read in my old age as it was in my youth. The humour is raw but subtle. The tragedy of racism never got better exposure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Highly recommended.

    Ralph Ellison has an excellent command of English.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2012

    Its an amazing book!

    I'm only an 8th grader but this is deffintly an amazing book and although the concepts of this book are kinda hard for me to grasp I deffinetly LOVE this book. Its one of the better books I've reas in a long time.

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  • Posted February 29, 2012

    Invisible Man is Great!

    Invisible Man is a very good book that really changes your perspective on what African Americans were feeling at the time. I really like how this book shows how some Americans at the time did care about all people but some hated African Americans. I recommend this book to anyone who wants a first person account of how African Americans lived in the 1930s. I gave Invisible Man 4 out of 5 stars because of the truth it tells.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    Awesome

    This book is awesome !

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2006

    great book

    this is the second time that i have read this book. However, this book has great power, the power to take your imagination and understanding of african american history into a whole new understanding. this book is great for anyone interest in race relations and the knowledge of the past. this book i thought was better understood when i read it for the second time, when reading again i caught some things that i missed the first time. great book highly recommendend for anyone interested........

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2005

    Brilliant!

    I thought this book was awesome! It is the best book I've read in a while about the problems between blacks and whites during the Depression Era. It's kind of cool, too, because the main character's name is never revealed throughout the entire book. Ralph Ellison takes the reader on a journey through the eyes of a young , black man. There is mystery, friendship, betrayal, etc. I definitely recommend this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2005

    Wonderful

    This is a good book to read. It shows a man perspective and how hard it was to live in the early 1900's. This book is very deep and showes a lot of compassion. It showes how a nation is divied because of racism. It is a very well written book i reccomend it to anyone that likes to read. If you have questions of what it was like to be a minority and live back then read this book it answers a lot of questions.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2005

    a message that still prevails today

    the title in itself gives evidence to a book worth reading. Ralph Ellison through his words and plot overview, not only give the reader something to ponder after the book is concluded; but something to consider. I enjoyed this book, and I recommend it to anyone seeking answers to questions never asked, or answered. This book still prevails as one of my favorite book. although the about writes about a divided nation, this novel can help the united states become a nation of one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2005

    Invisible Man was a great book!

    I gave this book 4 stars only for the reason of the title. When I went over the book list for my college course I thought it would be a mystery book because of the title I thought Invisible Man would be scary or mysterious. But the book is not at all scary. I enjoyed reading this book because the Invisible Man was a guy that someone can relate to. He was an african american man just trying to find an identity or purpose in his life. I recommend this book to anyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2004

    A Good Read.

    The Invisible Man was truly a wonderful novel. It was very hard for me to put it down because it was very eventful. However, some parts of the book like when he's singing the three page jazz song gets pretty dull. Other than that I would recommend it to everybody I have ever met.

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