Customer Reviews for

Island (P.S. Series)

Average Rating 4.5
( 63 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(45)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

I really liked this book a lot, but having said that, I actually

I really liked this book a lot, but having said that, I actually thought it was a continuation of "Brave New World". In Brave New World, Huxley mentions the Island several times. It is a place for those who have not been able to adapt to the Brave New World so...
I really liked this book a lot, but having said that, I actually thought it was a continuation of "Brave New World". In Brave New World, Huxley mentions the Island several times. It is a place for those who have not been able to adapt to the Brave New World society of pre-conditioned and expected behavior, thinking and lifestyle. The Island is the place for those who tend to be individuals and think for themselves. It is not a form of punishment, but rather a way to have those who have not given in to Soma and the Rules of Brave New World, to still have a place to live among others like them and express themselves, yet be productive human beings. Well, this Island is not that.




Island is about a man who ends up in this "paradise" and people who truly have found synergy in the way they live, interact and love. The place where they have found a way, as many try, to "harness human spirit". They tend to think of themselves as individuals, but working towards common goal and trying to better their society while still keeping their individual thinking. It all sounds great and as many have tried, to create a perfect world, but once again, we see that it is not possible. Not because it just can't be done, but because there is always someone, those, who tend to want something different from the rest. Whether it is good, bad, evil or however someone wants to judge that behavior, there are always those who do not give in or don't want to go along with the rest, no matter how good it might be.




Religious:
The book, or better yet the society, that Huxley describes is pointing out that all the organized religions have a flow. At the same time, it points out that Buddhism allows the individual to be part of society, but still be an individual in their own sense of being. Well, I don't know enough about Buddhism to know for sure if that is the way of the Buddha or this is just their, Pala's way of Buddhism. I am pretty sure that if the book wanted to take a point of religion or lack of religion is either too constrictive or too relaxed, respectively, wouldn't it apply to most or all? Just pointing out that Huxley, in this fictional Utopian paradise, describes Buddhism or their form of Buddhism as a way of living in "here and now", therefore enjoying every moment and not some distant eternal life. 




Spirituality:
Through my martial arts training, I have read, taken and tried multiple forms of medication and ways of zen being. In the book, they talk in some depth about how meditating or inducing subconscious thinking, either naturally or through moksha-medicine, they are able to find their inner being, restore balance and "be happy". Everyone on the island can and should be able to induce this state at any given time. Huxley's fascination with describing induced Utopia involves suggestive or subconscious state. In Brave New World we have seen Soma and here through Moksha-medicine. 




Social Structure:
Even though they live in more or less equal society, if that was ever possible, they do have royalties and they do have those with more than normal human "greed" and "ambitions". In Pala, they don't have Socialism and they don't Capitalism. They live in harmony, where everyone contributes to society, to better that society and try various tasks, jobs that will better channel their natural ability and peek their interest for full satisfaction. They claim to have found a way to channel Muscle Man and Peter Pan types into challenges that make them non dangerous to society and also valuable in the sense of those abilities. It is a great way to ponder on something that can be done as such, but this is a fiction and in reality, there are those who can not be tamed and therefore lash out and develop on their natural human character. Human spirit is not possible to harness, condition or tame. Whether that spirit is good, to be an individual to strive for something that is not available or that spirit is to do evil and dwell on all that is wrong in the world, it cannot be contained. That is the nature behind any "Utopian" thinking and the problem behind it. 




The human nature is to want to do what it tends to do with unpredictable and unconditional thought process. Even in every "type" and every "character" of specific group, there are still multiple personal characteristics to each and every being. Even in the same family, same upbringing and same genetic structure, you can never predict what and how each one of the kids, even those who are exactly alike, will react in any given situation and preventing that behavior, would be almost, and actually, impossible.




Overall, I really liked this book. It is not a fast reading page turner, but yet, it is a page turner nevertheless and I really enjoyed it for many reasons. I also kept thinking and comparing it a lot to "Celestine Prophesy". Somehow the spiritual aspect of the book kept remind me of that novel. If you are expecting something, as I have, you might be disappointed at first, but yet, I found it to be very well delivered message and a very interesting topic. I am glad that I picked it up and even though, not what I expected originally, still enjoyed it a lot. I was torn, because I wish there was 4.5 starts instead of like(4) and love(5) decision.

posted by JakeNJ on December 9, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Island

Huxley really should have written this as an opinion essay instead of a novel, because an essay is basically what it is. The plot is simple enough: Utopian island under siege by a power-hungry and unenlightened rest of the world. But there comes a point, and pretty quic...
Huxley really should have written this as an opinion essay instead of a novel, because an essay is basically what it is. The plot is simple enough: Utopian island under siege by a power-hungry and unenlightened rest of the world. But there comes a point, and pretty quickly, at that, when one cannot help but notice that Huxley's version of Utopia is basically a hippie/beatnik-style world, complete with halucinogenic mushrooms and tantrik lovemaking--incidentally, at least half of the dialogue in the book is some islander explaining why the 'Yoga of Love' is so great. Furthermore, at least ninety percent of the book's dialogue is in page-length paragraphs, giving one the impression that people in Utopia never tire of rambling on about every single last detail of their society and what makes it tick... and somewhere in that paragraph of neverending rant, they will probably mention the tantrik stuff or the mushrooms. I would like to say that there's more to this book than that, but I'd be lying, so I'll stop here.

posted by Anonymous on September 5, 2003

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 4
  • Posted December 9, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    I really liked this book a lot, but having said that, I actually

    I really liked this book a lot, but having said that, I actually thought it was a continuation of "Brave New World". In Brave New World, Huxley mentions the Island several times. It is a place for those who have not been able to adapt to the Brave New World society of pre-conditioned and expected behavior, thinking and lifestyle. The Island is the place for those who tend to be individuals and think for themselves. It is not a form of punishment, but rather a way to have those who have not given in to Soma and the Rules of Brave New World, to still have a place to live among others like them and express themselves, yet be productive human beings. Well, this Island is not that.




    Island is about a man who ends up in this "paradise" and people who truly have found synergy in the way they live, interact and love. The place where they have found a way, as many try, to "harness human spirit". They tend to think of themselves as individuals, but working towards common goal and trying to better their society while still keeping their individual thinking. It all sounds great and as many have tried, to create a perfect world, but once again, we see that it is not possible. Not because it just can't be done, but because there is always someone, those, who tend to want something different from the rest. Whether it is good, bad, evil or however someone wants to judge that behavior, there are always those who do not give in or don't want to go along with the rest, no matter how good it might be.




    Religious:
    The book, or better yet the society, that Huxley describes is pointing out that all the organized religions have a flow. At the same time, it points out that Buddhism allows the individual to be part of society, but still be an individual in their own sense of being. Well, I don't know enough about Buddhism to know for sure if that is the way of the Buddha or this is just their, Pala's way of Buddhism. I am pretty sure that if the book wanted to take a point of religion or lack of religion is either too constrictive or too relaxed, respectively, wouldn't it apply to most or all? Just pointing out that Huxley, in this fictional Utopian paradise, describes Buddhism or their form of Buddhism as a way of living in "here and now", therefore enjoying every moment and not some distant eternal life. 




    Spirituality:
    Through my martial arts training, I have read, taken and tried multiple forms of medication and ways of zen being. In the book, they talk in some depth about how meditating or inducing subconscious thinking, either naturally or through moksha-medicine, they are able to find their inner being, restore balance and "be happy". Everyone on the island can and should be able to induce this state at any given time. Huxley's fascination with describing induced Utopia involves suggestive or subconscious state. In Brave New World we have seen Soma and here through Moksha-medicine. 




    Social Structure:
    Even though they live in more or less equal society, if that was ever possible, they do have royalties and they do have those with more than normal human "greed" and "ambitions". In Pala, they don't have Socialism and they don't Capitalism. They live in harmony, where everyone contributes to society, to better that society and try various tasks, jobs that will better channel their natural ability and peek their interest for full satisfaction. They claim to have found a way to channel Muscle Man and Peter Pan types into challenges that make them non dangerous to society and also valuable in the sense of those abilities. It is a great way to ponder on something that can be done as such, but this is a fiction and in reality, there are those who can not be tamed and therefore lash out and develop on their natural human character. Human spirit is not possible to harness, condition or tame. Whether that spirit is good, to be an individual to strive for something that is not available or that spirit is to do evil and dwell on all that is wrong in the world, it cannot be contained. That is the nature behind any "Utopian" thinking and the problem behind it. 




    The human nature is to want to do what it tends to do with unpredictable and unconditional thought process. Even in every "type" and every "character" of specific group, there are still multiple personal characteristics to each and every being. Even in the same family, same upbringing and same genetic structure, you can never predict what and how each one of the kids, even those who are exactly alike, will react in any given situation and preventing that behavior, would be almost, and actually, impossible.




    Overall, I really liked this book. It is not a fast reading page turner, but yet, it is a page turner nevertheless and I really enjoyed it for many reasons. I also kept thinking and comparing it a lot to "Celestine Prophesy". Somehow the spiritual aspect of the book kept remind me of that novel. If you are expecting something, as I have, you might be disappointed at first, but yet, I found it to be very well delivered message and a very interesting topic. I am glad that I picked it up and even though, not what I expected originally, still enjoyed it a lot. I was torn, because I wish there was 4.5 starts instead of like(4) and love(5) decision.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2003

    Island

    Huxley really should have written this as an opinion essay instead of a novel, because an essay is basically what it is. The plot is simple enough: Utopian island under siege by a power-hungry and unenlightened rest of the world. But there comes a point, and pretty quickly, at that, when one cannot help but notice that Huxley's version of Utopia is basically a hippie/beatnik-style world, complete with halucinogenic mushrooms and tantrik lovemaking--incidentally, at least half of the dialogue in the book is some islander explaining why the 'Yoga of Love' is so great. Furthermore, at least ninety percent of the book's dialogue is in page-length paragraphs, giving one the impression that people in Utopia never tire of rambling on about every single last detail of their society and what makes it tick... and somewhere in that paragraph of neverending rant, they will probably mention the tantrik stuff or the mushrooms. I would like to say that there's more to this book than that, but I'd be lying, so I'll stop here.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    One of Huxley's finest.

    This is an excellent book. In my opinion, it is significantly better than Brave New World (although I did think that was a great book as well). Pala is the only utopia i've ever read about that I wouldn't mind living in. Similar in a way to some of Salinger's later work involving the Glass family, mainly Seymour, in so far as there is a lot of discussion of Easter Religions.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2004

    Better Than Brave New World

    I came to Huxley through 'Brave New World' like many, I'm sure, and have found that few of his other works are commensurate. However, 'Island' is more thought provoking and consciousness invoking that BNW. It may not be as overtly profound but the ideas he is forwarding make you stop and examine your own life, the way you were brought up and think about things. This is clearly a very important work.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2003

    A College Student's Perspective

    Aldous Huxley, an author that realized reality and envisioned the future, shows an incredible talent of portarying the world as it stood in the 1930's. The description of Pala, Huxley's own Garden of Eden, will make your mouth water and imagination sour. It must be read between the lines, but Huxley's philosophy is screaming from this book. IN high school i read Brave New World, which was exactly what he DIDN'T want to happen. But Island is his own vision of what life should be--freedom to be who you want to be, living in the here and now, and being fully aware of all that surrounds you (which could range from the grass under your feet to the little gurgles in your stomach). Huxley is a magnificient author who has captured my interest in the ever changing society, has opened my eyes to the 'real' world, and has provoked me to do some writing of my own. I strongly suggest this book to anyone trying to find that better place, but know too well that its not there. Here it is, in this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2001

    Perhaps Huxley's Best Novel

    The manuscript of this novel was saved from a fire in 1961 by Huxley's wife. Thank goodness Huxley's last novel didn't perish, it may be his best. 'Island' is a true paradise with few social problems or elements of social conditioning,unlike 'Brave New World'. A similar utopia could be achieved in our world if we could only follow Huxley's visionary outline.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2000

    Truly, an intellectual teaser!

    This book is definelty for people who enjoy contemporary social theory and debates on humankind in the 20th century and beyond. I would only recommend this book if you are really looking for interesting and very in depth discussion on some pretty serious issues. . . it is a very thought provoking novel.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Elise

    Leaves* -,-

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Eliza

    -_- Honestly this personal lag i have is getting anyoing

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Nako the demons wifes devil

    COMES OUT OF THE UNDERWORLD I CAME BACK FOR REVENGE CAUSE YOU ALL KI?LLED MY HUSBAND I LAUGH EVILY? AS MY EYES TURN RED MAKING A HUGE TORNADO? WAHAHHHAHAHAA

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Drew

    (Shocker(sarcasm)) He forms ice and water spikes and shoots them at the kraken

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Emma to shade and lydia

    Come to olympus res 2 please. I have to ralk to u.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Lydia

    Gtgtb.bbt.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 28, 2013

    A Utopian Vision Huxley's fictional island paradise is called P

    A Utopian Vision

    Huxley's fictional island paradise is called Pala and it is where the journalist Will Farnaby is washed up on the beach. He has been sent to encourage the oil companies claim to exploit the oil reserves on the island. The first people he meets are Dr MacPhail and the young Raj Murugan. His mother is the Rani and controlling influence in his minority. She wants to use the oil reserves to finance a Crusade of the Spirit and so purge the islands of 'hypnotism, pantheism and free love.'  Murugan seeks to establish his authority by siding with his mother against the 'old fogies' of the constitutional government in order to modernise and industrialise the island.


    Palanese life is simplicity itself. They grow food co-operatively in planted terraces. The only industry on the island is the cement works and people work there part time in-between the forest, agriculture and the saw mill. Pala has a system of self governing units, geographical, economic and political. They also have no established church, religion is based on immediate gratification and no unjustifiable dogma. 


    Children and birth control become an important part of the system as the island does not produce more children than it can realistically feed, clothe and educate. In addition children are brought up in Mutual Adoption Clubs with between 15 - 25 couples who share responsibility in bringing up the children of the group. At 4 or 5 all children undergo a physical and psychological assessment to ascertain any problems with shyness or over aggressive behaviour. Steps are then taken to readjust this behaviour and integrate them into Palanese life. Crimes does not occur very often, but when it does it is dealt with through counselling in the MAC and if necessary medication.


    They see Western medicine as largely primitive, although they value antibiotics and sewerage systems  for stopping the spread if disease they see our cure rather than prevention. Instead they look at a holistic system which takes into account what you eat, think, feel, hear, how you make love and how you view you place in the world. By looking at the person as a whole they take a more rounded and Buddhist influenced view of the individual. 


    The final chapter is given over to Wills experience of what we may term 'magic mushrooms' explaining both the euphoric and terrifying experience associated with the hallucinogen. Despite the prospect of change for Pala, Huxley still ends the novel positively. Will has experienced something totally unique and credible and due to this experience his thinking has been changed. What ever happens to Pala, Will Farnaby will never be the same again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2012

    THIS IS ALL ZERO'S PLACE NOW

    Yeah i own all of the results here.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2012

    Louis

    Yeah, go rick!! XD

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2012

    JOIN ASHCLAN!

    Go to "cho" all results

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2012

    Join Moonclan

    Join Moonclan at moonchild first result. All warriors get one extra life and medicine cats can have mates, because we are favored by Starclan. All spots except leader are open. If you want to join, respond as "To Moonstar". I also need somebody to rp Silkfur, our medicine cat. She is a silver she cat with light blue eyes. Plz join!
    ~Moonstar of Moonclan~

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2012

    Maggotpelt to Inkheart

    Join me. I am nt a clan, but u can be my partner or apprentuce. Now... whick clan should we invade first? How about fireclan? (Fireclan first result.)

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2012

    Unknowm

    I walk away.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 4