Customer Reviews for

The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan, and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America

Average Rating 4.5
( 48 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted June 13, 2009

    The Island at the Center of the World.

    I am a former New York City "Big Apple Greeter" who now does tours on my own. I take out mostly families and school groups. I knew a little about the early Dutch influence but now a lot of detail. This spectacular book changed that. The way it is written allows for a free flowing narrative which almost gave it a "fiction" feel. At times, with all the names, dates and bits of information I got a little bogged down and overwhelmed. This however was not a big problem. I re-read certain sections again as I needed to. And the thoroughly inclusive index in the back allowed me to go back and quickly reference anything I needed to as I went along. The fact that I read this book is going to allow me to be a much better tour guide. I will be able to tell more interesting stories and answer questions that the "tourists" have. Somebody I know referred me to this book. I am so happy they did that they have a dinner coming ... on me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 12, 2009

    A Book that Serves Multiple Purposes to All

    New York History is overlooked in the Colonial Era of the United States. In school, students are taught about how Virginia and New England played an important part of the formation of the United States. After reading this book, I found that New York combined both the buisness aspect and the tolerance aspect of the Dutch which neither New England and Virigia did in their respective colonies. The colony might have been short -lived but The Dutch influence still is present today. The government, business, historical landmarks, and other aspects of the Dutch colony still stand as a reminder that other cultures due provide a fundamental structure to the formation of the United States. As a History Major, The book taught me more about the area I live in and to appreciate the history of the area.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 28, 2012

    The book was great. A must read for history teachers.

    This book brings back some of New York"s forgotten history that is not taught in our schools today. Russell Shorto brings back the old streets of the city to life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 8, 2011

    Fascinating - Incredibly well written

    As a native New Yorker, and a history major in college, I found this book to be a fascinating and lively story of the Dutch colony of Manhattan - a story which is not often told. Shorto gives a very engaging account of the history of the Dutch colony, drawing on some 12,000 pages of documents that have been recently translated. The individuals who populated the colony truly come alive in this spellbinding narrative. A MUST read for anyone interested in not only early New York, but also how so many aspects of our popular culture today are directly tied to the colony of New Amsterdam.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2011

    Different perspective

    Well-written (always a plus for history), characters drawn well and documented, different perspective on an old subject usually drawn from a totally British point of view. I've recommended this to many lovers of history.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2014

    Highly Recommended - Hard to put down once you start

    I overheard some people discussing this book in a restaurant and was intrigued. They were so right about how good it is! It's a history of how New York City developed, not the dry way you learned in school, but the more interesting and intriguing story based on newly discovered archives. The book reads like a novel. The writing is top-notch. I loved it.

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  • Posted March 26, 2011

    I'll take Manhattan

    Shorto's account of the Dutch beginnings in Manhattan is a rollercoaster ride through philosophers, adventurers, politicians and prostitutes, a multinational corporation and early multiculturalism, and an unknown candidate for Founding Father named Adriaen Van Der Donck. And what a ride!

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  • Posted May 26, 2010

    History Made Up-Front and Personal

    Russell Shorto breathes life into the residents of New Amsterdam like no one before him, while gracing us with heretofore unwritten elements discovered by the New Amsterdam Project, based on documents which survived a fire in Albany, NY, and were painsstakingly translated from The Dutch Language of the Seventeenth Cenury over a period of ten years. The untold story of the lives of those in the original Dutch city-colony of New Amsterdam are finally revealed in characteristic colloquial splendor. A maritime Rennaissance Empire which rivaled England by far in the early seventeenth century, in every cultural regard is imaged for the tru lovers of history in personal relationships. All persons great and small in the Dutch Colony are painstakingly brought to life by Mr. Shorto, who deserves five stars across the board for his efforts. Efforts which effectively contribute to the accurate writing of previously uncovered and broadly unknown history; which in turn, broadsides our false notions of Anglo-superiority in the exploration of America. A sinking notion indeed.

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  • Posted May 16, 2010

    A Good Read!

    Recently discovered and translated original materials enlighten the history of colonial American and Manhattan in particular. If you like political, social, and religious history and if you want to know how Manhattan developed its special character as as a world capitol, you will enjoy this book.

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  • Posted April 11, 2010

    An Island of Tolerance as a Fulcrum of Empires

    This is a dramatic case study of the loss humanity suffers when only part of history is known. The Island at the Center of the World is a story of partial history written by and for the victor in the battle for empire.

    The straightforward style of this work, based upon more than two decades of translation from the original Dutch records about the European settlement of New York, compels us to wonder what other treasures await revelation in the future. We can only hope that those treasures are as revealing and instructive.

    In this perspective of history I learned two things about the world of my early ancestors. First, my early Dutch ancestors arrived only four years, rather than forty years, after my Mayflower ancestors. The tolerance that the world recognizes in the Netherlands today was a major factor in creating the Manhattan that is still a center of the world today.

    Barbara Tuchman's March of Folly has been a guide in my personal and professional life. This text should change the understanding of our world today the same as if it were Part Five of that historical analysis. We will all benefit as individuals look at the world through this lens.

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  • Posted September 12, 2009

    The New York We Forgot

    As Russell Shorto points out, the winners write the history. So his first object was to uncover the Dutch experience in New Amsterdam which the British so skillfully and derisively obscured. He found a patient and diligent researcher whom he praises almost to the point of hagiography. For without him, Shorto would have had little from which to spin his marvelous tale.

    From the explorer Hudson to the colony ruler Stuyvesant, THE ISLAND AT THE CENTER OF THE WORLD is an eye-opening revelation of the real impetus to the unique community that sprung up on the tip of Manhattan. For instance, we learn early on that the wall for which Wall St. is named was built not to keep out the "Indians" (who were an integral part of the Dutch colony) but the British. And that the silly fables about a few dollars was but a token of friendship to cement a bargain by which the enterprising Dutch could build an open community NOT buy an island.

    Shorto's magic is the life he has breathed into Charles Gehring's thirty years of painstaking scholarship among thousands of pages of boring state records. Minutes of council meetings, judicial decisions, land titles and marriages. As noted, the famous are here with great depth and vitality but also a central character new to all of us whom I leave to the author to introduce.

    Finally, Shorto traces the rocky relationship between Britain and Holland as both strove for domination of sea trade in the wake of fading Spanish and Portuguese empires. And all of it with wit and insight into their world ... and ours. Great read and a gift idea that will repay the giver with smiles and thanks.

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  • Posted June 24, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent history of New York

    I read this book on the advice of a friend of mine. This book is excellent. Most history books put me to sleep, but this one kept me very engaged. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is easy to read as well as very informative. You can tell the author truely enjoys his topic and has immersed himself in the details. Great job!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2008

    A different look at history

    I was very excited to read this book and I was not dissapointed. This book reads like best selling fiction. Shorto does an amazing job of not only introducing readers to a colony that many people do not know much about, but also inviting you into the lives of ordinary and extrodinary people who helped shape America.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2007

    Overdue credit for seeds of liberty

    I haven¿t enjoyed any book so much in a long time. I loved my flashes of recognition as Shorto pointed out the traces of Dutch culture in America, and the exciting leaps and reversals of fortune before Peter Stuyvesant finally had to yield to the English. Anyone who loves liberty would have to find this book rewarding. Who knew that we got our district attorney system from a precocious disciple of Grotius himself? Not I ¿ perhaps you. Of course, as a Virginian, I was raised to think the Pilgrims got undeserved credit for all the good in our system. How welcome to find a New Yorker, no less, who agrees!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2006

    Amazing, Surprising History

    Shorto really wrote a great book here. I had no idea that the Dutch had played such a vital role in the former colony. It really is true, as Shorto explains, that tons of information was hidden when the English started writing their own history on Manhattan Island. He writes with a great style that will keep you reading and has a way of packing in more information than you thought possible while making it flow like a novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2006

    great book

    The book is very educational and I believe complements well the book 'Albion's Seed' by David Hackett Fischer. Being half Dutch myself, I must say Russel pushes the racial and cultural tolerance thing a little too far. My New York neighbor agrees with me on that one. But anyone with common sense will be able to see beyond that. Afterall, many modern historical authors are compelled to add their two cents worth at the end of their books, politically correct or not.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2006

    Fascinating, humorous, visual, historical

    I am not yet finished this book, but I must say that it is one of the more enjoyable books I've read in recent history. I have learned so much about 16th and 17th century Europe, which was a remarkable time of expansion, both physically and in the mind, an extension of which became a colony called New Netherland, centered around the island of Manahata. Shorto writes beautifully. Not only is this full of great history, the story flows and the characters develop and it makes me laugh out loud while reading on the subway.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2005

    Interesting Addition to English America

    Like most Americans, I grew up being taught that America was a British concoction. The mores, societal norms, ideas of freedom and individual rights, came straight from mother England, were planted in New England, and blossomed into what we have come to know as America. This didn't wash with what I understood the early New England colonists to stand for - intolerance, religious fanaticism, with little regard for individual rights. How did we get from there to here? Via Dutch Manhattan as it turns out. While hardly a cake walk, the Dutch colony was, relatively speaking, a much more tolerant society that the English colonies to it's north and south. Shorto tells the story of the Dutch colony in easy, well written style. I found the chapters concerning Dutch Manhattan's very earliest years pretty dry because they are almost entirely written from legal records. Once flesh and blood characters like Van der Donck and Stuveysant are introduced the story takes on a more vibrant tone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2005

    Good historic account

    Having lived in NYC for more than 20 years, I now have a great appreciation for the city I tried to escape from so desperately in my youth. I was quite surprised to find out that even back then Manhattan was relatively a cosmopolitan and tolerant city. These are great legacies these early Dutch settlers left us.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2005

    Dutch New Amsterdam Remembered

    Russell Shorto's narrative of the Dutch period of New York City (and State) has provided readers with a great insight into a world long ago but not long gone. 'The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan, the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America', based partly on the research/translating work of Charles Gehring, is a good introduction to this neglected period in America's history, and will also surprise those well-versed in the subject. His thesis, that the New Netherland Dutch influenced the development of American history, society, and law is not entirely new, but he does expand upon our pre-existing notions of that influence. But even though not everything here is new to some of us, what the real accomplishment is--and Shorto deserves our appreciation for it--that this book finally makes this history accessible. While other books have covered this ground, they were so bogged down with statistics and numbers that they were almost unreadable. Shorto's narrative style and his ability to bring such colorful people back to life (Hudson, Stuyvesant, van der Donck, et al.), makes his book accessible to those who might not be inclined to buy a book on this subject. On a personal level, Shorto's 'The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan, the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America', much like Burrows and Wallace's 'Gotham' brought the ancient days of my city back to life. For a moment, as I sat in Bowling Green, I was able to erase the tall buildings and populate that area with trees and small, gable-roofed houses. I could wipe away the old Custom-House and see the fort that once stood in its place. That is how good the writing is. And that's what I meant by saying Shorto's wonderful account is that of a world long ago but not long gone.

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