Customer Reviews for

January First: A Child's Descent into Madness and Her Father's Struggle to Save Her

Average Rating 4.5
( 59 )
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(35)

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(16)

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(4)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Wow....

As an RN in a very busy ER, we commonly see these patients. And it is VERY sad that medicare/medicaid and insurance have cut back on reimbursements for the psych population admissions. Basically leaving them to fend on their own in an outpatient treatment setting, thes...
As an RN in a very busy ER, we commonly see these patients. And it is VERY sad that medicare/medicaid and insurance have cut back on reimbursements for the psych population admissions. Basically leaving them to fend on their own in an outpatient treatment setting, these patients could all use this gentlemen in their lives or someone like him....a fighter, a patient advocate!

posted by 9929662 on September 11, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

January Doesn't need to be bleak

People fear what they don't understand. The time has come for people to understand the truth about schizophrenia. Not what is portrayed in the movies. Not what the lamestream media wants to publicize, but The Truth, all of it, even the parts that aren't pretty (not many...
People fear what they don't understand. The time has come for people to understand the truth about schizophrenia. Not what is portrayed in the movies. Not what the lamestream media wants to publicize, but The Truth, all of it, even the parts that aren't pretty (not many are).
Go on, say the word. Let it roll around on your tongue a bit before forcing it past your lips into the open air.
Feels weird, doesn't it? Not so bad, right? Now, try to attach it to someone you love: your best friend, your sister or (God forbid) your own child. Ask yourself this: if my child were suffering, what would I want the world to know about them? How would I want them treated? How would I cope? Who could I trust? Where would we go? How would we function in this place where people shield their eyes and run?
Bet you can't even begin to guess. I'm going to go so far as to say, I bet many a reader will pick this book up, read a few chapters, form a few misguided opinions about bad parenting, set it down and thank their lucky stars that it isn't THEM who is affected--it isn't THEIR child lashing out, talking to trees (or dogs or unicorns or demons or...pick your poison here) lost in the world, relying on psychiatry to catch up to the rest of modern medicine and praying people will be kind.
But it could be you. If it could happen to Jani, the offspring of two intelligent, loving parents who doted on her and held every aspiration of sending her straight to the top to take over the world, it could happen to you. It happened to me. It happens every day, to families everywhere who feel they have to walk around stigmatized for a biochemical grenade which buried itself in their loved one's brain and blew up when they least expected it.
And that, my reading friends, is exactly why you need to read this book.
Not only is it well written, it is gritty, raw and truthful. It doesn't paint mental illness in any light other than the one that illuminated the Schofield family. And their light, no matter how much it dimmed, never went out.
Instead it became a beacon of hope.

posted by Elsie_Love on August 28, 2012

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  • Posted August 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    January Doesn't need to be bleak

    People fear what they don't understand. The time has come for people to understand the truth about schizophrenia. Not what is portrayed in the movies. Not what the lamestream media wants to publicize, but The Truth, all of it, even the parts that aren't pretty (not many are).
    Go on, say the word. Let it roll around on your tongue a bit before forcing it past your lips into the open air.
    Feels weird, doesn't it? Not so bad, right? Now, try to attach it to someone you love: your best friend, your sister or (God forbid) your own child. Ask yourself this: if my child were suffering, what would I want the world to know about them? How would I want them treated? How would I cope? Who could I trust? Where would we go? How would we function in this place where people shield their eyes and run?
    Bet you can't even begin to guess. I'm going to go so far as to say, I bet many a reader will pick this book up, read a few chapters, form a few misguided opinions about bad parenting, set it down and thank their lucky stars that it isn't THEM who is affected--it isn't THEIR child lashing out, talking to trees (or dogs or unicorns or demons or...pick your poison here) lost in the world, relying on psychiatry to catch up to the rest of modern medicine and praying people will be kind.
    But it could be you. If it could happen to Jani, the offspring of two intelligent, loving parents who doted on her and held every aspiration of sending her straight to the top to take over the world, it could happen to you. It happened to me. It happens every day, to families everywhere who feel they have to walk around stigmatized for a biochemical grenade which buried itself in their loved one's brain and blew up when they least expected it.
    And that, my reading friends, is exactly why you need to read this book.
    Not only is it well written, it is gritty, raw and truthful. It doesn't paint mental illness in any light other than the one that illuminated the Schofield family. And their light, no matter how much it dimmed, never went out.
    Instead it became a beacon of hope.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2012

    Great! Interesting.

    Interesting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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