Customer Reviews for

Jesus Lives: Seeing His Love in Your Life

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Fabulous Pocket-Size Devotional!

Jesus Lives is a wonderful pocket-sized devotional written by Sarah Young. I was originally introduced to Sarah Young through her other book Jesus Calling. Jesus Lives is written in a different style, but is just as much an amazing and encouraging devotional!

Rather ...
Jesus Lives is a wonderful pocket-sized devotional written by Sarah Young. I was originally introduced to Sarah Young through her other book Jesus Calling. Jesus Lives is written in a different style, but is just as much an amazing and encouraging devotional!

Rather than the format of a daily devotional, Jesus Lives is broken up by category. You can easily look up all relevant devotional writings by category in the table of contents, which directly aligns with themes throughout the life of Jesus.

Feeling worried, fearful, full of anxiety, or lacking of faith? These issues and so many more are addressed with how Jesus would respond and encourage us to do the same.

Jesus Lives is a fantastic devotional, and I highly recommend it!

posted by 1015882 on January 27, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Jesus Lives, Devotional

Jesus Lives by Sarah Young
I eagerly anticipated reading this book, for I've had a lifetime fondness for devotionals.

Though I wanted to like it, I found myself disturbed right off the bat by the fact that it was written as if by the Lord Himself, which proved a con...
Jesus Lives by Sarah Young
I eagerly anticipated reading this book, for I've had a lifetime fondness for devotionals.

Though I wanted to like it, I found myself disturbed right off the bat by the fact that it was written as if by the Lord Himself, which proved a constant distraction. The thing is, I just couldn't imagine Jesus actually speaking words such as in this passage taken from page 44:

You are feeling brokenhearted and bound: entangled in webs of discouragement. Pick up the pieces of your broken heart---scattered all around you---and bring them to Me. Place them on the white linen cloth I provide, and wait in My healing Presence. Sit still in My holy Light while I cleanse you from binding webs of discouragement . . .

I don't know what is meant by the "white linen cloth." Though it has a lovely sound to it there is nothing Scriptural to warrant its inclusion in this paragraph. (Also, I couldn't help thinking that this paragraph sounds a bit New Age-y.) While it is true that the Lord is near to the brokenhearted, He does not coddle us. To those with whom He interacted during His earth life, His words had about them a holy directive bordering on sternness. He assured the woman taken in adultery that He didn't condemn her, and then went on to caution her to "Go and sin no more." To Peter, who had miserably denied Him three times, His words were, "Feed my sheep." There was no commiserating with his human weakness or sympathizing with his cowardice but rather, the command to move forward by engaging in what was to be his life's work.

God is not so much concerned with our comfort or happiness as He is with the molding of our characters into the likeness of His Son. Jesus walked amongst the common people of His day, healing the sick and imparting words of truth. What He didn't do was to encourage self-focus by lingering to give attention to the minute details of an individual's life. This is not to say that He had no care for one's burdens and the reasons behind them, but simply that life lay not in the scrutinizing of one's failures or wounds but in following Him.

Here is a passage from page 142:

The best strategy for accepting yourself, even when you make mistakes, is living close to Me . . .

There is a new movement today in Christianity, and it is that of substituting the word mistake for sin. While the Bible abounds with verses regarding sin, it is never called by any other name. A mistake is mispronouncing a word, or perhaps forgetting someone's name. A sin goes much deeper for it is a deliberate act of the will. Jesus did not suffer and die for our mistakes, but for our sins.

I find myself uncomfortable with the presumption required in putting words in the mouth of our Lord. Rather than imagining what He might say to those in need of encouragement, surely such individuals would be better served by reading for themselves the words of Christ found in Scripture. Anything less than this is second-hand at best, and bordering on sacrilege. (Fortunately, the author (or publisher) of this devotional did provide Scripture with each day's reading.)

This book lacks the substance of spiritual food, except for the Scriptures included with each passage, and which I found to be its only saving grace.

posted by Drhodes on December 26, 2009

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  • Posted December 26, 2009

    Jesus Lives, Devotional

    Jesus Lives by Sarah Young
    I eagerly anticipated reading this book, for I've had a lifetime fondness for devotionals.

    Though I wanted to like it, I found myself disturbed right off the bat by the fact that it was written as if by the Lord Himself, which proved a constant distraction. The thing is, I just couldn't imagine Jesus actually speaking words such as in this passage taken from page 44:

    You are feeling brokenhearted and bound: entangled in webs of discouragement. Pick up the pieces of your broken heart---scattered all around you---and bring them to Me. Place them on the white linen cloth I provide, and wait in My healing Presence. Sit still in My holy Light while I cleanse you from binding webs of discouragement . . .

    I don't know what is meant by the "white linen cloth." Though it has a lovely sound to it there is nothing Scriptural to warrant its inclusion in this paragraph. (Also, I couldn't help thinking that this paragraph sounds a bit New Age-y.) While it is true that the Lord is near to the brokenhearted, He does not coddle us. To those with whom He interacted during His earth life, His words had about them a holy directive bordering on sternness. He assured the woman taken in adultery that He didn't condemn her, and then went on to caution her to "Go and sin no more." To Peter, who had miserably denied Him three times, His words were, "Feed my sheep." There was no commiserating with his human weakness or sympathizing with his cowardice but rather, the command to move forward by engaging in what was to be his life's work.

    God is not so much concerned with our comfort or happiness as He is with the molding of our characters into the likeness of His Son. Jesus walked amongst the common people of His day, healing the sick and imparting words of truth. What He didn't do was to encourage self-focus by lingering to give attention to the minute details of an individual's life. This is not to say that He had no care for one's burdens and the reasons behind them, but simply that life lay not in the scrutinizing of one's failures or wounds but in following Him.

    Here is a passage from page 142:

    The best strategy for accepting yourself, even when you make mistakes, is living close to Me . . .

    There is a new movement today in Christianity, and it is that of substituting the word mistake for sin. While the Bible abounds with verses regarding sin, it is never called by any other name. A mistake is mispronouncing a word, or perhaps forgetting someone's name. A sin goes much deeper for it is a deliberate act of the will. Jesus did not suffer and die for our mistakes, but for our sins.

    I find myself uncomfortable with the presumption required in putting words in the mouth of our Lord. Rather than imagining what He might say to those in need of encouragement, surely such individuals would be better served by reading for themselves the words of Christ found in Scripture. Anything less than this is second-hand at best, and bordering on sacrilege. (Fortunately, the author (or publisher) of this devotional did provide Scripture with each day's reading.)

    This book lacks the substance of spiritual food, except for the Scriptures included with each passage, and which I found to be its only saving grace.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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