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The Jesus You Can't Ignore: What You Must Learn from the Bold Confrontations of Christ

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Not for the hard hearted

Warning: "The Jesus You Can't Ignore" is not an easy book to read. If you're one of those Christians who preaches a spreading of the Gospel through "love," friendship and tolerance, you won't like what John MacArthur has to say. In fact, you may quickly develop a harden...
Warning: "The Jesus You Can't Ignore" is not an easy book to read. If you're one of those Christians who preaches a spreading of the Gospel through "love," friendship and tolerance, you won't like what John MacArthur has to say. In fact, you may quickly develop a hardened heart and attitude similar to that of the Pharisees that Jesus and MacArthur preach against. Regardless, I still recommend you read this book. You may not like it, but it may be something you need to hear.

MacArthur's writes to confront that part of the church that has become too tolerant in fear of conflict. While his book starts out slow, covering obvious points, it quickly becomes more intriguing. I'm sure I'm not the only one with questions about the proper way to witness to non-Christians and the proper way to stand up for what the Bible clearly says is wrong, such as homosexuality.

MacArthur draws on examples from the Gospel when Jesus confronted the Pharisees and their false teachings. Discernment is the Christian's duty, MacArthur writes, and thus we have a duty to discern when it's the right moment for righteous judgment. Jesus did not preach to please. To the contrary, he spoke the truth, even though he knew it would push many of his followers away and incite conflict with the false teachers of the day. Jesus was about truth.

It's certainly a controversial subject, but it's worth a read if you're willing to accept it rather than reject it as "judgmental." Unfortunately, MacArthur does not spend much space relating Jesus' confrontations to modern times, and that will allow skeptical readers to toss aside what MacArthur has to say. Personally, I was left wanting more. How can I apply this to how I treat my non-Christian friends? How can I apply it to how I stand up for the truths found in the Bible? I guess I'm going to have to do my own truth searching now. Hopefully, you will too.

posted by HarmoniousGlow on October 3, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

The Jesus You Can't Ignore

By the title of this book, I was pretty excited to see what was in the pages. However, once I started reading, I was a little bit disappointed at how difficult it was to understand. I could hardly get through the introduction because a lot of the words I didn't understa...
By the title of this book, I was pretty excited to see what was in the pages. However, once I started reading, I was a little bit disappointed at how difficult it was to understand. I could hardly get through the introduction because a lot of the words I didn't understand and had to look up in a dictionary. The idea behind the book is great and the information is wonderful, but I had a hard time getting through the book easily.

The content was good though -- a book about how Jesus isn't just the nice, passive teacher we always think of. He was often confronting people and we need to see the entire Jesus, not just the peaceful and good-natured Jesus we expect.

posted by MichelleAlbertson on July 18, 2010

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  • Posted July 18, 2010

    The Jesus You Can't Ignore

    By the title of this book, I was pretty excited to see what was in the pages. However, once I started reading, I was a little bit disappointed at how difficult it was to understand. I could hardly get through the introduction because a lot of the words I didn't understand and had to look up in a dictionary. The idea behind the book is great and the information is wonderful, but I had a hard time getting through the book easily.

    The content was good though -- a book about how Jesus isn't just the nice, passive teacher we always think of. He was often confronting people and we need to see the entire Jesus, not just the peaceful and good-natured Jesus we expect.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 11, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Discover the times when Jesus did not "play nice"

    Jesus is often portrayed as a meek and nice guy, while His confrontations with the religious people are played down. However, there were times when Jesus was not someone who only played nice. In his book, MacArthur discusses the times when Jesus openly opposed the teachers of the Law and Pharisees regarding the hypocrisy of their faith. The book is based roughly on the sermon of Jesus recorded in Matthew 23 and critique of the Evangelical Manifesto.

    There is certain truth in the book - we should be aware of what and Who we believe in and be able to defend our beliefs if there is a need for it.

    That said, however, I disagree with the premise of the book that we should always be in attack mode. Besides, in Matthew 23 Jesus was not talking to representatives of other religions, He was talking to the true wolves in sheep's clothing - hypocrites, people who pretend to believe one thing and yet do something completely different. In Pharisees case, they pretended to be godly, but in reality they were extremely selfish. I do believe that the main reason He clashed with the Pharisees and teachers of the Law was because they confused FAITH and RELIGION. Now that is an argument that I agree with.

    I would recommend that book to others if they want to learn about the true Jesus. I would probably mention, however, that it is important to remember that while Jesus did oppose false teachings, He did so with wisdom and when necessary. MacArthur does mention that, but it gets sort of lost in the initial thoughts of militarism.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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