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The Journal of Curious Letters (13th Reality Series #1)

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Try it

This book took me a while to read,but it was worth it! If you can't decide if you should get it or not my advice is try the sample first then you would know what I mean by intresting. This book is great for people 8 and up. I warn you it not one of those baby books...
This book took me a while to read,but it was worth it! If you can't decide if you should get it or not my advice is try the sample first then you would know what I mean by intresting. This book is great for people 8 and up. I warn you it not one of those baby books with pictures on every page,with three words on every page,and it is definitly not one of those books that reads it's self to you.So if your looking for an intresting novel this is exactly what you looking for.

posted by Anonymous on April 3, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

Lame..................not

Sounds bad corny if made a movie it would be terrible just kidding sounds great

posted by 240977 on March 2, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    Amazing

    Great

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    Great! One error

    On page 238 there is an error where they forgot a quotation mark, but who really cares. The book is fantastic and I highly recomend it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2012

    should i get it

    Read the maze runner series and it was great and this sounds good but i have about 10 dollars left, is it worth it?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2012

    Read this book

    I love this book because the character is not perfect at all and I love it. Don't you hate it when the main character seems too perfect? This kid seems super weak but he builds character throughout the book, which I love. Could have been at least a second main character as his partner or something, but you should definitely give this book a read.

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  • Posted January 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    "The Journal of Curious Letters" by James Dashner :: The 13th Reality

    "The Journal of Curios Letters" What a great name, huh? Journal. Curious Letters. The. But I digress. *** Atticus "Tick" Higginbottom is a strange boy, there's no question about that. Quiet, constant target of the school bully, always clinging to his scarlet "Barf Scarf", and, weird as it is, he actually likes science?! So we have established that Tick is not, in most ways, normal. But to make it all even stranger, he starts getting these letters. Letters addressed from all over the world: Japan, Alaska, Kansas. All of them are written by the same "MG", and all of them contain clues. To what, there is no mention. The only other information given? Many lives are at stake. *** James Dashner, author of "The Maze Runner", has written another classic. I, personally, loved "The Maze Runner", and hope to do a review on it soon. Both of his aforementioned pieces have masses of potential, "TMR" is already being made into a movie. "The Journal of Curious Letters", I predict, will soon follow its predecessor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Sci Fi Fantasy Novel for teens!!!

    this book is amazing! Besides the magic in many novels, the whole universe of the story is based on quantum physics! It's educational, thrilling, mysterious, and funny all in one book!

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  • Posted May 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Masterpiece!

    This book was packed full of mystery, adventure, fantasy, mind-boggling riddles and much more. Do not miss experiencing the thrill of reading this book. It was a masterpiece that was made by James Dashner, who will continue to create great novels for the adolescent.

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  • Posted April 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Non-Stop Action!

    "The 13th Reality: The Journal of Curious Letters," by James Dashner is a story full of mystery, humor, suspense, and non-stop action! While the clues keep you pondering what the answers are and reading constantly to find out what is going to happen next, the humor keeps you laughing, and the suspense keeps you trembling, feeling like you are right beside Tick on his strange roller-coaster ride of a life!

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  • Posted April 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    good sense of adventure

    Will you join Atticus "Tick" Higginbottom and his friends on an amazing adventure through time and space also known as the "Realities"? What if you had to make a choice right here and now which had a significant consequence and could alter reality as you know it?
    In the first book of the 13th Reality series this is exactly what Tick and his friends find themselves facing. At thirteen years old, Tick has to make a choice and whatever he chooses could change the future or should I say the future of an alternate reality.
    This isn't the first book by James Dashner, but it by far one of his best. With 12 postmarked letters coming from all over the world to Tick, each containing a clue as to how he can help save the world and those he loves. But what is he saving his family from? And who is this M.G. sending the letters? Dashner doesn't miss a beat-from riddles to mathematical problems kids will find themselves being drawn into Atticus "Tick" Higgnbottom's reality.
    But it's not all fun and games. Tick doesn't know it yet, but M.G. has a very serious enemy and she doesn't want anyone helping or joining M.G. From Gnat Rat's to a crazy hit man, Tick must discover the magical words and prove he is willing to help. However, Tick can't do it alone, but who can he turn to? He doesn't have any friends. Well . . . where else would a thirteen year old turn . . . the internet and his dad.
    Finding his not alone, and having the trust and support of his dad, Tick is ready to face the unknown, solve M.G's riddles, and join his new found friends (via the internet) on one crazy quest into the 13th reality.
    I truly enjoyed reading The Journal of Curious Letters. The conflict and action are nonstop. The characters are well developed. The storyline complex yet entertaining. However, I did find the jumping around of character point of view a little annoying and distracting. I felt it was a weak way to explain details which could have easily been dropped into the storyline through dialog and observation from the main character . . . Tick. But, putting that one flaw aside, I feel children will enjoy reading The 13th Reality series. James Dashner won't disappoint those who have a curious mind, sense of adventure, and love for science.
    Stories for Children Magazine editor, VS Grenier

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    the 13th Reality

    The 13th reality is a great book for anyone who doesn't enjoy reading. It is action packed and filled with suspense and wonder. I give it a 10 out of 10.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2009

    It was AWESOME!!!!!!! i CAN'T WAIT FOR THE NEXT ONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I thought it was fun and exciting to see where the next letter would take him.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2008

    it blow me all the way to the 100th reality!!

    it didnt take me long to finish it but it is not better than harry potter, twilight is 2 percent better maybe 100 hahahha i love this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2008

    Don't miss this one!

    Another great series has begun! The characters are extremely likeable and the book has mystery, action, and humor. I liked the author's writing style and will defintely read the next book when it comes out!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2008

    Harry Potter is goin down! & that's sayin somethin

    Harry Potter is almost nothing compared to this--although I still love HP books. Tick is so much like me, I just couldn't believe it. This book is for someone who loves comedy mixed with excitement and action and loves to solve riddles. I just had to think about the riddles, but I didn't because I couldn't/wouldn't put the book down. When I bought it, I started reading it and the first thing I thought was, 'Hey, this is like Leven Thumps!' That's good because I love that series. I could hardly put it down, but I had to because we were in a hotel and my parents were tired and turned out the lights. However, I finished it the next day, and it was awesome! I totally recommed this book. Dashner is now my all time favorite author and he has inspired me to write. I just hope my book can be as good as his, if that's possible. If you haven't read it, go to your nearest bookstore and buy it. Now! It's the best book I've ever read. Thank you Dashner for writing this book instead of just making it a figment of your imagination and keeping it there. My favorite part is when Tick sends everyone home with a Barrier Wand that doesn't have its Chhi'karda Drive. My mouth dropped open in awe. It's awesome! :D

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2008

    A reviewer

    The 13th Reality: The Journal of Curious Letters by James Dashner was another book that I managed to snag from LibraryThing's Early Reviewer program (3 books in 2 months I couldn't believe my luck!). This book is as different from those others as night is to day and was the perfect read after the seriousness of my last book, The Translator by Daoud Hari. The Journal of Curious Letters is the first book in a series and the central character is a boy name Atticus ¿Tick¿ Higginbottom. Tick is a mostly normal 13 year old boy who is a bit too smart for his age and has trouble dealing with bullies. In essence, Tick is living the life of the average American teen. That is until he receives a strange letter in the mail that sets him on a path that will change all that he thought he know about the world around him. No, Tick is not some long lost heir to a faerie throne and there is no great and wondrous that that only he and he alone can do. Tick can chose at any time to change his course. To not read the letters. To not go to a dark cemetery late at night to be whisked off to who knows were. Yes, danger lurks just around the corner. Tick knows this and he decides to turn the corner anyway because sometimes the bigger picture takes more priority then the comfort of a single person. The main theme of this book is one of choice and the power that each choice a person has to shape not just their life but also the lives of those around them. Overall I really enjoyed this book and know that if I was teen reading it I'd be hard at work trying to figure out all the clues as they arrived. But as I am old(ish) and wake up at 5 AM most mornings, I decided to just sit back and follow along as Tick solved the clues for me as I rode the train into the city. One plus about this book (or negative depending on how you look at it) is that it made laugh out loud at some sections. How can this be negative you ask? Well, try riding on a crowded train tucked in your own little world iPod in and suddenly laughing. Yeah, you get looks. Mostly odd looks, some slightly amused ones and some downright dirty ones (usually coming from the person sitting next to me who I may or may not have woken up from their morning/evening nap). The science geek in me also really liked all the science talk. With luck this story will show kids that science really is fun. =) As with most first books in a series the story was a little slow to start. There was a whole lot of build up with the receipt of the letters and the figuring out of the clues (which took up the bulk of the book) that when Tick and the other kids who choose to stick it out finally all came together to learn the why of it all that last quarter section seemed just a little rushed. I almost would have liked to have seen more time spent in the 13th reality...but I suppose that will come with the next book(s?) in the series and I will just have to work on learning patience in the meantime. There were also times in which the dialog between characters seemed a little repetitive and unreal to me....but then to be repetitive is a flaw of many people I know (myself included). The character of Mothball also bothered me a little, no so much her but more her way of speaking. There were too many 'methinks', 'it is's' and similar such phrases tossed at the end of almost every sentence she spoke. It got a little grating at times so thankfully she left most of the talking to those around her. The final small issue I had with this book/series is that I think it might give me an irrational fear of the color yellow. But as yellow just washes me out and makes me paler then I already am, this might not be such a bad thing....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2008

    A reviewer

    James Dashner's 'The 13th Reality Series' is off to a thrilling start in the book The Journal of Curious Letters! The reader is introduced to Atticus Higginbottom, nicknamed Tick, a budding genius who receives a mysterious letter informing him that he has been chosen to help with an important mission - if he is willing to solve clues presented to him in subsequent letters. As the story unfolds, Tick embarks on an exciting adventure and is met with a unique cast of characters along the way. The world Dashner creates for this novel is a fresh mix of witty teen literature and science fiction. The characters range from believable young adults and supportive parents to a broad range of fantasy-world sidekicks and villains. The brain-teasers and science aspects of the story will hopefully encourage young readers to engage their minds in the book. Part of the fun in reading it is certainly the challenge of solving the puzzles before the protagonists. Another great aspect of this novel was that the main characters were not heroes because of some magical destiny. Each one had the choice to pursue greatness in the face of dangers and I think the lessons of courage and responsible choices will resonate with young adult readers. Overall, The Journal of Curious Letters is a delightful book that will leave audiences of all ages eager for the next installment of what looks to be a very promising new series!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2008

    A reviewer

    The 13th Reality: the Journal of Curious Letters is the first in a series by James Dashner. We follow the adventures of Atticus Higginbottom, or Tick as he likes to be called, as he begins to receive mysterious letters in the mail with clues as to a secret, magical ritual that he will need to perform that will help save the lives of many people. With no idea who is sending the letters or how to perform the ritual other than the enigmatic clues hidden in the letters he receives, Tick must discover the secret to the ritual and where and when to perform it. Gaining some friends along the way, Tick overcomes many obstacles to complete his mission and save the day. To put it simply, I really enjoyed this book. Reading this as an adult, I didn't find it a particularly challenging book, but I know that when I was younger I would have loved this book just as much, if not more. Not being a parent, I can't always comment on how these books would be perceived by children, but there was one aspect of this book that immediately stood out to me from other books in the genre. In most kids books today, the protagonists are always the same age as the target audience, which is expected, but the kids always feel the need to keep their adventures secret from their parents or the adults most capable of helping them. I suppose the idea is to instill a sense of independence in kids, to give them the feeling that they can do anything, and that's a great attribute to instill in kids. It's what I'd want to do if I were a parent. However, it seems that sometimes this idea that kids need to keep secrets from the adults around them is taken to new levels in some books. What I liked about The Journal of Curious Letters is that Dashner did away with that stereotype and had Tick go to his dad and explain what was going on, and his dad took an active role in the story and the process of discovering the secret behind the mystery. Granted, they then kept the whole secret from Tick's mom, but the idea that Tick appreciated the fact that an adult's input would help him really stood out to me. I thought that this was a nice departure from the norm that Tick's dad allowed him to be independent and follow through with his mission while being there as a support system for his son. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of the typical young kids books notions in The 13th Reality: like many protagonists, Tick's name is unusual, he's considered an outcast in school, he has an unusual physical feature that we wants to keep hidden, he gains a select number of friends around his same age to join in the adventure there are secrets galore, a mysterious villain, mental and physical challenges, but he always overcomes these obstacles. The scientific part of the mystery I think will help the book appeal to a wider range of kids, too. My only real complaint would be that the buildup of the story throughout the book seemed a little long in comparison to the actual ending. I feel that with such a large buildup there could have been more fleshing out of the final battle it just all seemed a little rushed to me. Either the buildup could have been shortened in some way, or there could have been more time spent on the final sequence with the kids in the 13th Reality. I think the characters could have been developed a little bit more, but this is the first book, so I can excuse that. There's always room in the following books to explore their backgrounds. I don't know that The 13th Reality series will be a runaway success like some others, but based on the first book, I can't imagine that it will be disregarded either. I think The Journal of Curious Letters, and the series as a whole, should appeal to both kids and adults who enjoy kids books equally. I anxiously await Tick's continuing adventures in the Realities.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2008

    Watch out Harry, You've got some Competition!!

    This book is AWESOME! It really is an excellent book. My first impression was that James has DEFINITELY improved since he wrote Jimmy Fincher. Now, I love me some Jimmy Fincher. Great storyline, wonderful ending. I never thought anything about the writing, I was just impressed with James' story-telling skills. James has gone on record as saying he doesn¿t like the first Jimmy Fincher book much, that he thinks it¿s not well written. I always scoff at him, because it¿s a good read. Anyways, the book is called ¿The 13th Reality: The Journal of Curious Letters¿ and is about a boy named Atticus Higginbottom. I was curious if there would be similarities to Jimmy Fincher and there are a few..mainly how James throws in names/places from his childhood. Only a handful of people would recognize this, so it¿s probably not something worth noting. I find it hilarious and love it. Atticus is nicknamed Tick and is kind of nerdy. Tick receives a letter in the mail one day that changes his life forever. He has to solve a series of riddles/clues and ends up finding new friends and new adventures. I¿m not going to detail the book because uh, you have to read it. I¿m just giving the general storyline. One thing that stood out in my mind reading 13th Reality and comparing it to Jimmy Fincher is: everything felt more¿professional. I guess that¿s the word I¿m looking for. The writing was more fluid, more detailed. There wasn¿t a hint of awkwardness or stumbling. I was amazed at how the story unfolded and how much more complicated and intricate it was compared to Jimmy Fincher. I really felt like this new one is on a completely different level and loved it. I can¿t wait for the 2nd one to come out, James definitely left me wanting more! Way to go dude, I think you have a winner on your hands. I see great fame and fortune ahead and can¿t freaking wait to be able to walk into a B&N and see your display. Be sure to check out James' blog! He's doing a great Charity Drive!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2008

    Addictive book, I hated putting it down

    This is a fantabulous book. I loved it until about the middle. Then it changed for the better. Then I REALLY loved the book. I got hooked. I¿ve also determined that it¿s fairly believable. It explains everything weird with a widely accepted theory from real life. Harry Potter (not as good as _The_Thirteenth_Reality_) just explains stuff with 'magic.' Yeah, explain magic to me scientifically without saying ¿I don¿t know¿ or making stuff up. On the other hand, The Thirteenth Reality uses science to explain things. All in all, _The_Thirteenth_Reality_ is a great book. Read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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