Customer Reviews for

Journey to Rainbow Island

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(3)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

I love this book, the story is full of action and is very descri

I love this book, the story is full of action and is very descriptive. Buy this book and you will fall in love with it right away!

posted by Anonymous on December 27, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

This is the complete review as it appears on my blog. There may

This is the complete review as it appears on my blog. There may be links in the blog reviews which are not reproduced here, nor will changes and modifications to the blog review be replicated here.

I had the weirdest feeling when I started this that this novel wasn't w...
This is the complete review as it appears on my blog. There may be links in the blog reviews which are not reproduced here, nor will changes and modifications to the blog review be replicated here.

I had the weirdest feeling when I started this that this novel wasn't written for a lone reader, but for someone to read to children. I don't know if Hsaio intended that, but that's how it felt to me, which wouldn't have been so bad if the writing wasn't so flowery that it's actually hard to read (and I don't mean technically hard, either). There's far too much hyperbole, and too many redundant phrases like "obsidian black". While I think I see what she intended by that, it seemed about as meaningful to me as saying "dark black". Later, she uses the awful phrase, "jaundiced shade of pale yellow" which is so redundant as to be absurd.

I'm a sucker for Asians and their mythology, but I'm definitely not the intended age range for this novel (which is 8 - 12 years old), but I do have two sons within that age range, and I can assure you that they would not touch a novel like this with a ten-foot pole. And rest assured that if I had a daughter, she would not like it either because it's simply not an engaging story, nor is it intelligently written. The story should appeal to the My Little Pony crowd, but if that's too immature for you or your kids, you won't like this novel at all. I do however, have a suggestion as to how that could be fixed at the end of this review.

Much as I wanted to enjoy this, Hsaio seemed determined to irritate me with every fresh chapter. She's yet another of these shamefully ignorant writers I've encountered this year who think the upper arm muscles (biceps and triceps) come in a singular form! Indeed she refers with an authoritative tone to the upper tricep! Honestly? A simple spell-checker would have caught this gaff. I may not deserve better than this, but my sons do, as do others of their age group.

These people seem to have no problem with killing (no, that's cruel, I meant rendering....) when it suits them. The real irony of this exchange with the hunter is that without the knowledge and skill of such people, Yu-ning would never have a hunting weapon (her bow) to go after the Obsidigons to begin with! Indeed, at one point, a giant owl named Suparna, declares proudly "…in order for the light to shine...we must rend - or tear - the light from the dark." Why the violent language?

There are unintentional moments of hilarity: Yu-ning's arms started to tire from the power of the light? Light has no mass, so how is it tiring, exactly? If you want to enlighten children, don't keep them in the dark about light! Explain the science without vague allusions and obfuscations regarding faith and inner light - especially when you really don't understand light! This level of hilarity was somewhat unleavened with unexplained events such as Julian's claim that Yu-ning cured him? Of what? Hunger? She gave him an apple and that's it!

I expected a lot more from this novel and was sorry that such a promising premise failed to deliver on all levels but art. The illustrations were charming, and quite well done, but they were sadly let down by the writing. Perhaps this volume should have come out as a graphic novel? I rated it warty.

posted by Anonymous on November 12, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    This has to be the worst book ever written. I bought it based on

    This has to be the worst book ever written. I bought it based on the award winning producers endorsements, I can't imagine that they read it.
    Don't waste your money, it's really bad and I want my money back!
    The only reason I gave it one star is because there is no option of giving it none, one is far too generous.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2013

    This is the complete review as it appears on my blog. There may

    This is the complete review as it appears on my blog. There may be links in the blog reviews which are not reproduced here, nor will changes and modifications to the blog review be replicated here.

    I had the weirdest feeling when I started this that this novel wasn't written for a lone reader, but for someone to read to children. I don't know if Hsaio intended that, but that's how it felt to me, which wouldn't have been so bad if the writing wasn't so flowery that it's actually hard to read (and I don't mean technically hard, either). There's far too much hyperbole, and too many redundant phrases like "obsidian black". While I think I see what she intended by that, it seemed about as meaningful to me as saying "dark black". Later, she uses the awful phrase, "jaundiced shade of pale yellow" which is so redundant as to be absurd.

    I'm a sucker for Asians and their mythology, but I'm definitely not the intended age range for this novel (which is 8 - 12 years old), but I do have two sons within that age range, and I can assure you that they would not touch a novel like this with a ten-foot pole. And rest assured that if I had a daughter, she would not like it either because it's simply not an engaging story, nor is it intelligently written. The story should appeal to the My Little Pony crowd, but if that's too immature for you or your kids, you won't like this novel at all. I do however, have a suggestion as to how that could be fixed at the end of this review.

    Much as I wanted to enjoy this, Hsaio seemed determined to irritate me with every fresh chapter. She's yet another of these shamefully ignorant writers I've encountered this year who think the upper arm muscles (biceps and triceps) come in a singular form! Indeed she refers with an authoritative tone to the upper tricep! Honestly? A simple spell-checker would have caught this gaff. I may not deserve better than this, but my sons do, as do others of their age group.

    These people seem to have no problem with killing (no, that's cruel, I meant rendering....) when it suits them. The real irony of this exchange with the hunter is that without the knowledge and skill of such people, Yu-ning would never have a hunting weapon (her bow) to go after the Obsidigons to begin with! Indeed, at one point, a giant owl named Suparna, declares proudly "…in order for the light to shine...we must rend - or tear - the light from the dark." Why the violent language?

    There are unintentional moments of hilarity: Yu-ning's arms started to tire from the power of the light? Light has no mass, so how is it tiring, exactly? If you want to enlighten children, don't keep them in the dark about light! Explain the science without vague allusions and obfuscations regarding faith and inner light - especially when you really don't understand light! This level of hilarity was somewhat unleavened with unexplained events such as Julian's claim that Yu-ning cured him? Of what? Hunger? She gave him an apple and that's it!

    I expected a lot more from this novel and was sorry that such a promising premise failed to deliver on all levels but art. The illustrations were charming, and quite well done, but they were sadly let down by the writing. Perhaps this volume should have come out as a graphic novel? I rated it warty.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    This book was an insult to my intelligence. I was paid by the bo

    This book was an insult to my intelligence. I was paid by the book's author (or rather, representatives on behalf of the book's author) to review this. I'd rather risk them asking for me to return the money than give a dishonest review. The story was crammed with every cliched plot devise imaginable but was devoid of anything meaningful. After Googling Ms. Hsiao, the author, it becomes apparent that she abandoned her work as a failed entertainment producer in lieu of this new cash-grabbing endeavor. The only editorial reviews listed for this book are from her friends an ex-associates in the film industry. Should have made "Rainbow Island" a bad screenplay instead of a bad book. I would give this title zero stars if I possibly could; for now I'll settle for a one-star review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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