Customer Reviews for

Jumper

Average Rating 4.5
( 115 )
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(62)

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(11)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Better than the Movie!

Jumper the book was so much better than the movie. The movie did a lot of twisting with the book and added characters and other problems that made it confusing. But the book,wow, Steven Gould wrote a masterpiece. The best Sci-Fi book I've ever read. It's a personal ...
Jumper the book was so much better than the movie. The movie did a lot of twisting with the book and added characters and other problems that made it confusing. But the book,wow, Steven Gould wrote a masterpiece. The best Sci-Fi book I've ever read. It's a personal favorite for me!

posted by Anonymous on April 6, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Teleporting boy goes to NYC and plans a bank heist

Davy lives with his alcoholic, stingy, abusive father. On one occasion, Davy accidentally "jumps" (teleports) away just as his father is about to beat him with a belt buckle. Seizing the opportunity, Davy runs away from home but finds himself accosted by a quartet of tr...
Davy lives with his alcoholic, stingy, abusive father. On one occasion, Davy accidentally "jumps" (teleports) away just as his father is about to beat him with a belt buckle. Seizing the opportunity, Davy runs away from home but finds himself accosted by a quartet of truck drivers. Luckily, he teleports away again. Realizing he has a strange and unbelievable talent, Davy decides to make his way in the world alone. Once in New York City, Davy finds that his age (seventeen years old) doesn't allow him to register for school or work without a parent or papers. In desperation, Davy plans a bank heist that can only be accomplished with his unique ability.

After walking away with a sizable sum of money, Davy lives the high life: living out of hotels, buying expensive clothes and eating at expensive restaurants. Despite having nearly everything he needs only a "jump" away, he discovers that he can only teleport to places he has been to before and can clearly picture in his mind. Backed by his bank heist money, he travels extensively in order to accumulate a large number of teleportation sites. Eventually, Davy puts his ability to use in stopping airline hijackers, but this catches the attention of the NSA, which seeks to understand Davy's ability and use him for their own purposes.

Despite the intriguing concept behind Steven Gould's Jumper, the novel doesn't offer much of a conflict for its protagonist until more than halfway through. While it is intriguing to follow Davy and see how he utilizes his ability, the plot is mostly just watching him figure things out. Much of the novel feels like a thought exercise in the best way to utilize such an ability to benefit oneself or others (within the confines of the mechanics of teleportation that Gould has established). It appears the drastic changes made to the movie adaptation was to create a conflict and a plot, which the book is lacking. Jumper is clearly aimed at a young adult audience, as Davy's angst may come across as childish or simply corny to older readers. Gould's description of New York City, and specifically Times Square, comes across as dated (the area hasn't been that way in over a decade and a half!).

Despite the plain writing style and the sometimes annoying angst of Davy, the book was still interesting enough to keep me reading almost non-stop until I was finished. I guess it was after finishing the book that I realized that I wish more had happened. Make sure to check out Reflex, the sequel to Jumper, for a more action-packed (and better-plotted) story with Davy and teleportation. If anything, a movie should have been made from Reflex, with Jumper only serving as an introduction to the better story.

[Disclosure: This review also appears on FingerFlow.com, a site for review and discussion of creative works.]

posted by JosephCopeli on August 5, 2010

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  • Posted August 5, 2010

    Teleporting boy goes to NYC and plans a bank heist

    Davy lives with his alcoholic, stingy, abusive father. On one occasion, Davy accidentally "jumps" (teleports) away just as his father is about to beat him with a belt buckle. Seizing the opportunity, Davy runs away from home but finds himself accosted by a quartet of truck drivers. Luckily, he teleports away again. Realizing he has a strange and unbelievable talent, Davy decides to make his way in the world alone. Once in New York City, Davy finds that his age (seventeen years old) doesn't allow him to register for school or work without a parent or papers. In desperation, Davy plans a bank heist that can only be accomplished with his unique ability.

    After walking away with a sizable sum of money, Davy lives the high life: living out of hotels, buying expensive clothes and eating at expensive restaurants. Despite having nearly everything he needs only a "jump" away, he discovers that he can only teleport to places he has been to before and can clearly picture in his mind. Backed by his bank heist money, he travels extensively in order to accumulate a large number of teleportation sites. Eventually, Davy puts his ability to use in stopping airline hijackers, but this catches the attention of the NSA, which seeks to understand Davy's ability and use him for their own purposes.

    Despite the intriguing concept behind Steven Gould's Jumper, the novel doesn't offer much of a conflict for its protagonist until more than halfway through. While it is intriguing to follow Davy and see how he utilizes his ability, the plot is mostly just watching him figure things out. Much of the novel feels like a thought exercise in the best way to utilize such an ability to benefit oneself or others (within the confines of the mechanics of teleportation that Gould has established). It appears the drastic changes made to the movie adaptation was to create a conflict and a plot, which the book is lacking. Jumper is clearly aimed at a young adult audience, as Davy's angst may come across as childish or simply corny to older readers. Gould's description of New York City, and specifically Times Square, comes across as dated (the area hasn't been that way in over a decade and a half!).

    Despite the plain writing style and the sometimes annoying angst of Davy, the book was still interesting enough to keep me reading almost non-stop until I was finished. I guess it was after finishing the book that I realized that I wish more had happened. Make sure to check out Reflex, the sequel to Jumper, for a more action-packed (and better-plotted) story with Davy and teleportation. If anything, a movie should have been made from Reflex, with Jumper only serving as an introduction to the better story.

    [Disclosure: This review also appears on FingerFlow.com, a site for review and discussion of creative works.]

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Jumper was a decent good over-all. The novel did not meet my expectations on teleportation and had no comparison with the film. The storyline was very slow, and boring. Furthermore, they do not mention Griffin anywhere and no mention with the Palidans. Also, the storyline was not mention in the film which was a MAJOR let-down. Finally, the Davy's mother survives and is a Palidan in the film, but dies in the novel. ??? Overrall the novel is decent, but Mr. Gould, your writing is not.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2008

    Okay Book, But Won┬┐t Be Going Out Of My Way To Find The Sequel (Reviewed by TheBookworm)

    Jumper (Movie Tie-In) by Steven Gould<BR/>Publication Date: February 2008 Reprint<BR/>3 out of 5 stars<BR/>R - Sexual Content, Violence, Alcohol Abuse, Profanity<BR/>Not Recommended<BR/><BR/>When David ¿Davy¿ Rice was 12, his mother left him in the care of his abusive alcoholic father. Five years later at the age of 17, he is now on his own. Hurting from the mental and physical wounds inflicted upon him by his father, Davy is set on settling in New York City and beginning his own life. Unable to get a job because of his lack of identification documents, he decides to get money through more questionable means. With government agents hot on his heels and a great girlfriend by his side, Davy¿s mental and physical battles escalate. Only one thing is keeping him and his girlfriend out of the government¿s hands¿ his ability to teleport.<BR/><BR/>Jumper was an interesting book with a heavy atmosphere and a character who¿s morals and judgments were slightly askew.<BR/><BR/>I wanted to pity Davy and yet I detested some of his actions. Half the time I wanted to give him a much needed hug and the other half I wanted to talk some sense into him. Davy was strong in the face of danger, but his venerability around Millie, his girlfriend, made me like him all the more.<BR/><BR/>I admired Davy¿s humor and sense of hope. Life is full of many dark, depressing events, so why not look forward to the light at the end of the tunnel and hold on to the hope for a happy, enjoyable life? I liked Millie because she was able to keep the light of hope burning in Davy when all he wanted to do was give up.<BR/><BR/>This novel began to lag around the middle, but with the help of some cruel, sad events the author got the story rolling again. The ending seemed to sneak up on me. The last 30 pages covered a huge amount of information, of which I was just barely able to absorb.<BR/><BR/>The reason I can¿t comfortably recommend this novel, is because of the sexual content, attempted rape, and strong profanity (f-word used very often).<BR/><BR/>If you think that this book sounds interesting and/or the main character sounds interesting, I suggest You don¿t know me by David Klass. You don¿t know me doesn¿t have anything paranormal, but Davy (from Jumper) and John (from You don¿t know me) are quite a lot alike in the fact that they both have abusive father figures and they both have to deal with the mental and physical wounds inflicted upon them because of it. I¿m going to overuse this word but, its ¿interesting¿ to see these characters survive and their emotions and behavior change, mature, grow, and become self-relying but yet able to show weakness at the appropriate times.<BR/><BR/>Jumper was an okay book, but I won¿t be going out of my way to find and read its sequel.<BR/><BR/>Date Reviewed: December 14th, 2008<BR/><BR/>For more book reviews and book information check out my website at www.inthecurrent.blogspot.com

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2008

    DISAPPOINTING

    If you saw the movie and you were intrigued by the concept and some of the ideas in the film such as the whole Jumper/Paladin thing and hoped the book would unlock what seemed like a fascinating mythology, you are barking up the wrong tree. The original book doesn't even have the word Paladin in it, its quite simply a love story about a guy who can teleport and some drama with his Dad and his long lost mother. Its very melodramatic and reads like a bad 80s movie...

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted March 19, 2012

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