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Kids Make History: A New Look at America's Story

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  • Posted November 2, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for TeensReadToo.com

    At first glance, you might mistake KIDS MAKE HISTORY as a children's book. After further inspection, though, you'll realize that this great title in the A NEW LOOK AT AMERICA'S STORY series is a wonderful fact-based reference book for anyone, regardless of age. <BR/><BR/>There are twenty true stories included in this book, all featuring kids who helped make history. Spanning the years from 1607 to 2001, each story includes a young adult who made a difference in one or another--and, in some cases, even managed to have an impact on historical events. <BR/><BR/>Powhatan's Favorite Daughter (1607)--The real story of Pocohantas. <BR/>James Towne Boy (1608)--The story of Sam Collier, a boy from James Towne. <BR/>Evil in the Air (1692)--Ann Putnam, a girl from Salem Village. <BR/>Kidnapped (1743)--Peter Williamson, an indentured servant. <BR/>Yankee Doodle Soldier (1776)--The story of Joseph Plumb Martin, a soldier in the Continental Army. <BR/>The House on the Hill (1838)--John Rankin, Jr., a young hero of the Underground Railroad. <BR/>"Never Take No Cutoffs" (1846)--Virginia Reed, a young member of the Donner Party. <BR/>Pony Rider (1854)--The story of Nick Wilson, a Pony Express rider. <BR/>Pull-Up Boy (1860)--Marty Myers, who at age six began working at the Sligo Iron Works. <BR/>Working for Freedom (1863)--Susie Baker, a member of the First South Carolina Volunteers. <BR/>Pioneer Girl (1868)--The true story of Laura Ingalls Wilder. <BR/>"There Blows!" (1875)--George Fred Tilton, a young boy on a whaling ship. <BR/>"A Most Wonderful Sight" (1893)--Jane Sever, a visitor at the Chicago World's Fair. <BR/>High Jinks in the White House (1902)--The six children of Theodore and Edith Roosevelt. <BR/>Low Bridge! (1909)--Richard Garrity and his family's life aboard a canal boat. <BR/>Riding the Orphan Train (1926)--Al Clement, a young orphan picked from among others on a train. <BR/>Sunday Morning at Pearl Harbor (1941)--A young girl, Joan Zuber, lives through the attack on Pearl Harbor. <BR/>On the Circuit (1955)--Francisco Jimenez, a sixth-grader working in the cotton fields. <BR/>"It's About Freedom" (1963)--Malcolm Hooks, marching for equal rights. <BR/>9/11: The Day the Towers Fell (2001)--Two high school students, Jukay Hsu and Amit Friedlander, experience 9/11. <BR/><BR/>This is a great book for anyone interested in history, and especially the roles that young adults have played in making our country what it is today. A wonderful read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2007

    A reviewer

    At first glance, you might mistake KIDS MAKE HISTORY as a children's book. After further inspection, though, you'll realize that this great title in the A NEW LOOK AT AMERICA'S STORY series is a wonderful fact-based reference book for anyone, regardless of age. There are twenty true stories included in this book, all featuring kids who helped make history. Spanning the years from 1607 to 2001, each story includes a young adult who made a difference in one or another--and, in some cases, even managed to have an impact on historical events. Powhatan's Favorite Daughter (1607)--The real story of Pocohantas. James Towne Boy (1608)--The story of Sam Collier, a boy from James Towne. Evil in the Air (1692)--Ann Putnam, a girl from Salem Village. Kidnapped (1743)--Peter Williamson, an indentured servant. Yankee Doodle Soldier (1776)--The story of Joseph Plumb Martin, a soldier in the Continental Army. The House on the Hill (1838)--John Rankin, Jr., a young hero of the Underground Railroad. 'Never Take No Cutoffs' (1846)--Virginia Reed, a young member of the Donner Party. Pony Rider (1854)--The story of Nick Wilson, a Pony Express rider. Pull-Up Boy (1860)--Marty Myers, who at age six began working at the Sligo Iron Works. Working for Freedom (1863)--Susie Baker, a member of the First South Carolina Volunteers. Pioneer Girl (1868)--The true story of Laura Ingalls Wilder. 'There Blows!' (1875)--George Fred Tilton, a young boy on a whaling ship. 'A Most Wonderful Sight' (1893)--Jane Sever, a visitor at the Chicago World's Fair. High Jinks in the White House (1902)--The six children of Theodore and Edith Roosevelt. Low Bridge! (1909)--Richard Garrity and his family's life aboard a canal boat. Riding the Orphan Train (1926)--Al Clement, a young orphan picked from among others on a train. Sunday Morning at Pearl Harbor (1941)--A young girl, Joan Zuber, lives through the attack on Pearl Harbor. On the Circuit (1955)--Francisco Jimenez, a sixth-grader working in the cotton fields. 'It's About Freedom' (1963)--Malcolm Hooks, marching for equal rights. 9/11: The Day the Towers Fell (2001)--Two high school students, Jukay Hsu and Amit Friedlander, experience 9/11. This is a great book for anyone interested in history, and especially the roles that young adults have played in making our country what it is today. A wonderful read! **Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka 'The Genius'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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