Customer Reviews for

Kim (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 3.5
( 125 )
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(39)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Underrated masterpiece

Ok, we all know that he was a colonialist and at times bordered on bigotry, but this book is Rudyard Kipling's best and it is an absolute masterpiece. It's the ultimate tale of an Englishman gone native: James Bond meets Siddhartha. Kipling's identification wi...
Ok, we all know that he was a colonialist and at times bordered on bigotry, but this book is Rudyard Kipling's best and it is an absolute masterpiece. It's the ultimate tale of an Englishman gone native: James Bond meets Siddhartha. Kipling's identification with Kim, his young protagonist, is complete. This is the work of a man passionately in love with India, and in possession of extraordinary powers of observation and description.

posted by Anonymous on March 16, 2005

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

had to discard

print too small--lines too long--unreadable

posted by americanirish on September 24, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2005

    Underrated masterpiece

    Ok, we all know that he was a colonialist and at times bordered on bigotry, but this book is Rudyard Kipling's best and it is an absolute masterpiece. It's the ultimate tale of an Englishman gone native: James Bond meets Siddhartha. Kipling's identification with Kim, his young protagonist, is complete. This is the work of a man passionately in love with India, and in possession of extraordinary powers of observation and description.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I Love Kim!!

    I love Kim!! It is the most amazing book and it touches you. Kim my grandfather wanted me to read it and I have to say I was a little sceptical at first , but it turned out to be asdonding. YOU must read this book and watch the movie with Errol Flynn!! Its is simaler to the book in some was. I am 11 and I love Kim and Rudyard Kiplings books.I would recommend this to someone. I have to my friend Caroline. I also recommed Kim the movie with Errol Flynn it is the best of them all.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Riolu

    *he smiles* i made a good choice with you. *he strokes her hair*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Riolu

    It's okay. Same here though. But i will be here if you want to come back.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Dani

    She says Ok and pushes u roughly onto a wooden chair after slapping her ra.pist. She dances expertly in front of him eventually removing her cloth dropping it in his lap. She sits down naked with one leg on either side facing u

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Dani

    Gets down and drinks it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Riolu

    *he unties her wrists and sits in a chair. He takes off his shirt. He has a tan body and a six pack* give me a lap dance.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    Kass

    Well..with my wedding coming up and micahs has his early graduation comin up so yaa

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    Fun Novel

    I always thought of Rudyard Kipling as a stuffy British colonial writer. I had no clue he spent many of his formative years in India. His first language was Hindi. This book is a tribute to his upbringing. This book has many references which I was not familiar with, but the notes in this edition really did add some value to my reading experience. If you are a fan of road stories, or coming of age tales then you will definitely enjoy this novel.

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  • Posted February 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    KIM's Womenfolk

    55 years ago I wrote an A+ term paper on "The Motherhood of Lady MacBeth." Did I make much of little in Shakespeare's play?" *** Are the handful of women in Rudyard Kipling's 1901 novel of British India, more important to KIM than Lady MacBeth's motherhood? Yes. But the women are background, peripheral to the spiritual quest of Kimball O'Hara between ages 13 and 17. Very few European women are mentioned in KIM: (1) spy chief Colonel Creighton's wife for her brief role as hostess in Umballa for the Army Commander in Chief; and (2) Annie Shott, Kim's Irish domestic servant mother. Annie died of cholera when Kim was three. Perhaps author Kipling killed her off because of the well-attested negative cross-cultural influences of British Memsahibs within the British Empire. They often distanced themselves socially, even the poor like Annie O'Hara, from the sea of alien natives surrounding them. It seems important that Kim lost his Irish mother early, and, not long after that, his still young ex-Sergeant Irish father died of drink and opium. Parents were around long enough to teach Kim the ruling class's English language and to make sure he knew his rights as a potential ruler of India. Their early deaths freed Kim from British prejudice against Indian Muslims, Hindus and Sikhs. White Kim grew towards manhood uniquely open-minded. *** On his father's death a new woman was there for Kim: his father's unnamed mistress, "the half-caste woman who looked after him" in Lahore. She insisted that the white boy wear European "trousers, shirt and a battered hat." But impish Kim often dyed his skin even darker than the sun had burnt it and passed himself off as a low-caste Hindu for secret missions carrying love letters to and from other men's wives across the rooftops of Lahore for the Pathan horse trader Mahboob Ali . *** Kipling sketches scenes of a wealthy hill country noblewoman who travels down to the hot plains to visit her married daughter. She wins Buddhist merit by providing food and shelter to Kim and the Red Lama of Tibet whose disciple Kim made himself. But the woman, though kind-hearted, also wore out the aged lama with talk and requests for charms to assure the health of her grandchildren. *** Several native women remark on the good looks of our teenage spy-in-training for "the Great Game." Kim is sure to break many a girl's heart. Towards novel's end, the lama, seriously injured by two Tsarist spies, finds shelter with Kim in the tiny Himalayan hamlet Shamlegh-under-the-Snow. The still beautiful Woman of Shamlegh despatches her two husbands with others to carry the lama to the healing lowlands on a litter. She comes on to Kim and he sees it. It has happened before "in lands where women make the love." Kim is annoyed: "How can a man follow the Way or the Great Game when he is so-always pestered by women?" Previous women and girls had treated Kim as a boy. Now the Woman of Shamlegh flirts as woman does with man. Why? Because disguised Kim reminds her of a young huntsman Sahib she had once nursed to health. He promised to return and marry her. He did not, despite her education in English by "Ker-lis-ti-an" missionaries. Knowing what she wants, Kim "kissed her on the cheek, adding in English: 'Thank you verree much, my dear.'" *** Fortunately, there is much more in Kim to delight you than his fleeting relations with women. -OOO-

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2010

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    Posted May 25, 2011

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    Posted September 3, 2010

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    Posted September 10, 2010

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    Posted June 3, 2011

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    Posted October 16, 2010

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