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Customer Reviews for

The Kite Runner

Average Rating 4.5
( 2286 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1662)

4 Star

(428)

3 Star

(129)

2 Star

(29)

1 Star

(38)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

91 out of 97 people found this review helpful.

unforgettable....

The Kite Runner takes place in both Afghanistan and California. It's told from the perspective of Amir, first as a little boy and later on as a man. Amir grows up a privileged boy in Afghanistan. His best friend is Hassan, the son of the family servant. Amir is Pashtun,...
The Kite Runner takes place in both Afghanistan and California. It's told from the perspective of Amir, first as a little boy and later on as a man. Amir grows up a privileged boy in Afghanistan. His best friend is Hassan, the son of the family servant. Amir is Pashtun, Hassan is Hazara. Amir is Sunni, Hassan is Shi'a. Their differences don't change the fact that these boys were breastfed together, learned to crawl together and are basically inseparable. Then everything changes. Amir witnesses a horror done to Hassan and cannot forgive himself for not stepping in to help him and to do what is right. In 1975 Afghanistan is in turmoil and Amir, then 12 years old, and his father move to San Francisco. Amir grows up feeling guilt and self-hatred over the issue with Hassan and the subsequent results. Then one day, twenty five years after Amir has left Afghanistan, he receives a phone call summoning him back to the place he had hoped to forget. The caller tells Amir "there is a way to be good again."

The Kite Runner has for it's hero a very flawed human being.....but that's what makes him so believable. Amir the boy does a very cowardly, dastardly deed but Amir the man stands up to the Taliban and even more importantly, he stands up for what is right. This book has forgiveness, redemption and courage for it's main themes. We see how strong the ties of friendship and loyalty can become through the eyes of Amir and a broken little Afghan boy. The setting in Kabul and the culture of the Afghan people make for an interesting backdrop to an unforgettable novel.

posted by songcatchers on October 25, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 92 people found this review helpful.

Worst book I think I have ever read

I do not understand all of the good reviews for this book. The only good part of the book is the historical perspective. The main character is a horrible person. The writer┬┐s idea of redemption is pathetic in my opinion.

posted by Anonymous on August 18, 2008

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Page 2 of 115
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Amazing

    Love this book! Could not put it down.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    Fascinating novel of Afghanistan

    This book greatly helps understand the conflict in Afghanistan.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2007

    Disturbingly horrible

    People who like this book must thrive on horrible disturbing tragedy. This book was one atrocity after another. There was absolutely nothing happy in it. It was just a story of the lives ruined by a psychopath. I was depressed for weeks after reading it.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 17, 2013

    This is one of the most memorable books I have ever read: the wr

    This is one of the most memorable books I have ever read: the writing is lyrical in places, describing the beauty of the Afghanistan and its culture in vividly moving language. It is the beautifully drawn characters, full of nuances and illuminating events which bring the characters to life in a way I'll never forget. Regardless of one's nationality or religious beliefs, this is a book that captures the essence of all that is both good and bad about humanity. I cannot recommend this book highly enough....5 stars does not do it justice.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    It took me a little while to get going but once I did the story

    It took me a little while to get going but once I did the story is so powerful, that I just couldn't put it down. Very good read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2013

    Incredible!!!!

    Wish I could say I couldn't put it down but I had to So moving and gut-wrenching that emotionally I couldn't go on at times

    A must read for anyone who is concerned with the world around us

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2013

    Nooo to the kids

    This book is so graphic with kods being abused and raped. No kid should read this until you are atleast 15 or 16.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2013

    !

    Dont waste money buying the book, just read all the plot spoilers on here that give away the entire book! They save you tons of money!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2013

    Best

    Perhaps one of the best books out there

    Sad ,heart warming, and enjoyable

    Excellent story line and characters

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2013

    God!

    I hated this book it was boring, plotless and never drew me in

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 2, 2013

    Emotionally ripping and gripping at you the entire book, the Kit

    Emotionally ripping and gripping at you the entire book, the Kite Runner finds a way to transcend anything that could ever be expected and as a perfect cliche, haunts your for days...months...years....a true must read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Compelling story, hooks you from the first paragraph

    Peering into a time and culture few Westerners get to see, let alone understand. Mr. Hosseini puts us in his mind and vision and takes on a compelling, emotional and insiteful journey as his characters grow and change. Wonderful read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    Loved it

    Powerful story of an incredible friendship

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    Highly rated.

    Extremely well written.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2012

    This book is the epitemy of novels

    I had to read this for my summer prodject
    At first sceptical( this books didnt seem my type of read ) but I finished this book in five days and I wish there was more the author paints an exquisit picture of modern day Afganistan :)
    Read it-love it-want more of it

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Kite Runner is a beautifully written, enthralling read! The

    The Kite Runner is a beautifully written, enthralling read! The main character's inner turmoil is refreshingly honest. He battles with decisions driven by love, jealousy, guilt, and a sense of duty. This story of redemption forces the reader to consider the balance between self-preservation and loyalty.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2013

    Hooked and Loving it.

    This book I could not put down. I absolutely love his storytelling, he sucked me in and u will too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2011

    Terrible, Cloying, Pseudo-Dramatic

    This book is so overrated. It is literally the corniest novel I have ever read. There is nothing remotely interesting about the characters or the plot. I guess we're supposed to be left with the impression that the kite is a symbol of the soaring spirit of the Afghan man who left his home so long ago, but has come back to reconcile his past?...Give me a break! This is so schmaltzy, you will get a few cheap laughs from it, then either toss it in the trash or save it as a bathroom rag to get unwanted guests out of your house.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2010

    HIGHLY RECOMMENED- YOU SHOULD READ THIS BOOK!

    I definitely enjoyed reading The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini because it was really interesting, and the story was very deep and unforgettable. It's hard for me to believe that this is a fictional story, because it seems like it actually happened, it's realistic. I liked how the author portrayed Amir's thoughts, and how he changed throughout the book. I think it is cool how Sohrab is just like his dad, Hassan- he is very precise with sling shots, and it was awesome how he fulfilled Hassan's threat that was made to Assef long ago. This book had a good catch, an unexpected touch to it.
    In the beginning of the story, it shows how peaceful everything was until the monarchy. This story reminds and shows us how Afghani people have struggled to violence and war back then, and it may still threatens their lives today. It was extremely terrible how Hassan and his wife were killed by the Taliban, leaving poor Sohrab all alone, and how Amir had just found out he was his half brother in the end of the book. Amir had begun as a shameful, guilty young boy- he hid money under Hassan's mattress to frame him for stealing so Baba would make him leave. But towards the end when Amir goes to Kabul to find Sohrab, his friend Farid drives him to places. Amir stays as a guest at Farid's brother Wahid's house. Amir sees that Wahid's family is very poor, so before he leaves, he hides a wad of money under their mattress to help them. This time Amir does the same deed (hiding money under a mattress) for a different, good reason- to help Wahid's family. When he was younger, he did it to get away from the shame, and not live with Hassan. Amir grew as a character. This really stood out to me from other stories. I don't usually read historical fiction, but this book was fantastic and very meaningful to me. I would surely recommend this book to kids in high school, or older. This is a good book for a high school student because it is the level for high school students, the story relates to history, and it can teach people about the history of Afghanistan. I would rate this book 5 out of 5 stars for its touching story, and great grasp of history.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2010

    This book is very good, you need read this book!

    The story begins with the protagonist, Amir, during December of 2001, reflecting on his past childhood in Kabul, Afghanistan. He begins to look back on the year of 1975 and remembers himself climbing a tree with his servant, Hassan, who was also his best friend. Amir would always read one of his own made up stories to Hassan under their favorite pomegranate tree Hassan being a servant of Amir and Amir's father, Baba, lived in a mud hut with his father, Ali. Not only being a illiterate servant, but Hassan was also a Hazara, which was ethnicity that was executed and treated poorly in Afghanistan.

    Because he was a Hazara, some boys in Amir's neighborhood (Assef, Kamal, and Wali) picked fights with Amir and Hassan. In a confrontation with Assef, Amir was being threatened by him; Hassan held a slingshot which was aimed at Assef's eye. Reluctantly, Assef and his gang retreated but he left saying that they would pay. As a result of being a slave of Amir and Baba, Baba loves him and his father, Ali, like they were his son and brother. Because Baba loved Hassan like his own son, Amir began to envy Hassan and a rivalry between them was born, although Hassan was unaware of Amir's jealousy.

    During the winter of 1975, Amir and Hassan are in a kite running contest, which is a popular sport in Kabul, and Amir ends up winning the fight and then Hassan goes to get the kite. Amir goes after Hassan and finds him in an ally way cornered by Assef, Wali, and Kamal. They want the kite from Hassan, but Hassan says that it is Amir's. So Assef rapes Hassan. Amir watches Hassan getting raped. As a result they slowly became separated and Hassan and Ali left. Throughout the story he the memory of letting Hassan get raped haunts him.

    In 1981, the Russians invaded and Amir had to escape from Kabul with his father. Once they escaped, they left for Fremont, California. Financially they were barely getting by. While working in an Afghanistan market, Amir finds his, soon to be wife. After he gets married to Soraya, Baba died of lung cancer. In 2001, Amir found out that Hassan's son, Soraub, was in Afghanistan and he went to go get him. After he found him, Assef, who was now a Taliban official (Russian soldier), and fought him because they had "unfinished business. Later After the fight, Amir adopts Soraub and the story ends with them having a kite fight in San Francisco.

    The main themes of the Kite Runner are: jealousy and redemption. Redemption is shown throughout the whole story. For instance, when Amir realizes that Baba doesn't whole heartedly love Amir because Amir wasn't anything like him, he tried to redeem himself by winning the kite fighting contest. Also, when Amir found out that Hassan's son Soraub is suffering in Kabul, he goes to save him for atonement for himself from being a coward and letting Hassan get raped. For instance, when Amir saw how Baba treated Hassan so well and how he viewed him like his own son.

    The graphic detail of gruesome deaths and the morbidly twisted situations that get side characters killed was the only thing that I didn't like about this book. I enjoyed how realistic the plot was and how complex the storyline was. It made the book interesting with the story changing to different locations and how life continues going on, even though someone may die. I would have to rate this book about 5 stars because it had a very good plot and I recommend this to people who like a tragic story that ends with a happy, positive

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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