Customer Reviews for

The Knights of the Black and White (Templar Trilogy Series #1)

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

A fine historical thriller

Jewish families escaping the wrath of the Christian conquest of the Roman Empire create a secret society, the Order of the Rebirth of Sion, whose long term objective is to reveal the truth about the Church that they believe is built on lies and 'an invalid creation┬┐. O...
Jewish families escaping the wrath of the Christian conquest of the Roman Empire create a secret society, the Order of the Rebirth of Sion, whose long term objective is to reveal the truth about the Church that they believe is built on lies and 'an invalid creation┬┐. Over the centuries they hide, but prepare and wait patiently for the opportunity to destroy the myth. Late in the eleventh century, the chance arrives when Pope Urban calls for a Crusade to take back the Holy Land from the Infidels because the order believes that the proof is hidden under the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.-------------- Joining the Christian army is sworn members of the Order of the Rebirth of Sion like Sir Hugh de Payens and Stephen St. Clair. During the effort to free Jerusalem from the Muslims, men like these two seek entry into the Temple Mount where they plan to excavate. The violent war is a cover for competing western groups who either want to prove a sham or destroy the evidence, if any exists while the Muslims block their path into one of the holiest shrines. ---------------------- Conceptually the first book of the latest Templar tales contains a terrific theme as various hostile sides converge on the temple Mount. However, the story line is slowed down by obloquies, soliloquies and colloquies that ironically provide a key feel for the conditions of the First Crusaders but also lacks action. Still the Knights Templar crowd will enjoy the newest entry that enthusiastically illuminates what has become an inundated topic.---------------- Harriet Klausner

posted by Anonymous on June 23, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Could have been better!

I wanted SO badly to really love this book....but, to be honest, the first half was so boring and slow! It took a long, long time before I even started caring about the characters. It did get more interesting later on. It's almost like two different writers wrote this. ...
I wanted SO badly to really love this book....but, to be honest, the first half was so boring and slow! It took a long, long time before I even started caring about the characters. It did get more interesting later on. It's almost like two different writers wrote this. I enjoyed the second half and the ending, though.

posted by Anonymous on July 30, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2007

    Paul a Gentile?

    I've been a student of theology for most of my life, having attended private christian school since 1st grade. I've memorized much of the Bible. Yet, I've come to trust Jack Whyte's research and accuracy so much that when I saw him siting St. Paul as a Gentile I nearly dropped the book! St. Paul was one of the leading Jewish pharisees of his time until he was converted to Christianity. Although it's true he then headed up the growth of the church and was effectively the driving force behind converting gentiles to Christianity 'it was considered a jewish cult before then' he was a Jew's Jew genetically and in his heart. I'm enjoying the book, but the inaccuracy certainly breaks the suspension of disbelief. I'm amazed this important of a factual error made it past his editors and Whyte, himself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2011

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    Posted July 17, 2012

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2011

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