Customer Reviews for

Known to Evil (Leonid McGill Series #2)

Average Rating 4
( 41 )
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(17)

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(12)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Leonid McGill #2

Leonid McGill is 50-something, short, pudgy and bald. He's also a private detective, who had done nasty work and now is trying to be on the straight and narrow...sort of. He's got a bunch of friends he can call on for various services, as required, and they all show u...
Leonid McGill is 50-something, short, pudgy and bald. He's also a private detective, who had done nasty work and now is trying to be on the straight and narrow...sort of. He's got a bunch of friends he can call on for various services, as required, and they all show up in Known to Evil, the second in McGill series.

Alphonse Rinaldo, a secrete power in the New York City government, calls upon McGill to find the whereabouts of Tara Lear. Going to her last known address, he finds himself in the midst of a murder investigation of one, Wanda Soa. Since McGill is not a favorite of New York's finest, he finds himself a suspect.

In the midst of this, his sons Dimitri and Twilliam are trying to help a Russian girl who was forced into prostitution--Dimitri has a crush on her. Lastly, a women Leonid loves (he's in a loveless, cheating marriage) has found a new boyfriend.

I like several things about this series. I like the fact it takes place in New York. I like the characters. Leonid's father was a Communist and he's transferred his dislike of the establishment to Leonid. Leonid philosophizes throughout the book. He's a really likeable character. Actually, all the characters are likeable. There's enough action and enough blood, but not too much. Mosley's books are fast reads, but they also make you think about life. A good combination--mystery and philosophy.

posted by EdNY on April 19, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Don't waste your money!

The character Leonid MacGill was a disappointment. What black man or white for that matter would take back a cheating wife that runs off with another man, returns and ask to be taken back after her lover is arrested, have a child by another man while married? lastly, sh...
The character Leonid MacGill was a disappointment. What black man or white for that matter would take back a cheating wife that runs off with another man, returns and ask to be taken back after her lover is arrested, have a child by another man while married? lastly, she now has a young lover which her husband is aware of, yet he allows her to remain in the marriage because he also is a cheater. Unreal, not believable, I did not enjoy reading about his underworld, low life so call friends whom helped him with his investigation of a missing girl.

posted by 3475390 on May 2, 2010

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Posted April 17, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Leonid McGill, 2nd round!

    Rule 1: Don't come here looking for Easy Rawlin's. Wrong locale.
    Now then: If you read book one and like Leonid, this book brings even more reality to his world, his connections, his vices and his attempts to do the right thing, his shadowy past. As a character, he is well-drawn, and the mishaps of his mission to make sense of multiple mysterious cases going on around him makes a good read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 24, 2010

    Leonid is the Man

    Another bestseller. Bravo Mr. Mosley. The grittiness of the characters portrayed made it easy for me to follow the story and become entrenched in the story being told. Mosely always takes the time to build his characters especially the family members Leonid struggles to keep safe and unfortunately to keep Leonid's emotional balance even when Leonid gives up his own happiness for others.

    I cannot wait for the next book in the series.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Leonid McGill #2

    Leonid McGill is 50-something, short, pudgy and bald. He's also a private detective, who had done nasty work and now is trying to be on the straight and narrow...sort of. He's got a bunch of friends he can call on for various services, as required, and they all show up in Known to Evil, the second in McGill series.

    Alphonse Rinaldo, a secrete power in the New York City government, calls upon McGill to find the whereabouts of Tara Lear. Going to her last known address, he finds himself in the midst of a murder investigation of one, Wanda Soa. Since McGill is not a favorite of New York's finest, he finds himself a suspect.

    In the midst of this, his sons Dimitri and Twilliam are trying to help a Russian girl who was forced into prostitution--Dimitri has a crush on her. Lastly, a women Leonid loves (he's in a loveless, cheating marriage) has found a new boyfriend.

    I like several things about this series. I like the fact it takes place in New York. I like the characters. Leonid's father was a Communist and he's transferred his dislike of the establishment to Leonid. Leonid philosophizes throughout the book. He's a really likeable character. Actually, all the characters are likeable. There's enough action and enough blood, but not too much. Mosley's books are fast reads, but they also make you think about life. A good combination--mystery and philosophy.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2010

    Great Read.

    Another great read. Would recommend to anyone into mysteries.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 26, 2012

    A great detective story, even for Mosley!

    Detective Leonid McGill is not perfect, not a super hero, not tall, dark and handsome... oh... wait, he is dark. The thing about him that draws you in is the complexity of the character, the paradox of the situations McGill finds himself in with what his conscience really wants. To me, he's the ultimate good guy, fighting his own demons and deciding what's really important. His loyalty, sometimes seemingly misplaced, is yet understandable and admirable. The story, where McGill tries to save his son from making a serious mistake, and also handle a 'situation' for a savory, crooked politico, ends McGill in another nail biter where every decision is a matter of life and death. Loved this book! Warning: Don't start this book if you have something else to do!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 28, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Better Than The First

    I recently got into Walter Mosely's mysteries and I was excited about this new Leonid McGill series. The first ("Long Fall") left me feeling a bit unfulfilled. But this one has definitely restored my belief in the author and provided a new love for Leonid. It is a must read and I would recommend it to all!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2010

    Don't waste your money!

    The character Leonid MacGill was a disappointment. What black man or white for that matter would take back a cheating wife that runs off with another man, returns and ask to be taken back after her lover is arrested, have a child by another man while married? lastly, she now has a young lover which her husband is aware of, yet he allows her to remain in the marriage because he also is a cheater. Unreal, not believable, I did not enjoy reading about his underworld, low life so call friends whom helped him with his investigation of a missing girl.

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Mr Mosley has done it again

    Leonid McGill is a new private eye character of Mr. Walter Mosley, Since we bid farwell to Easy Rawlins , MacGill has defintely filled the shoes. This book is a good read, I reccomend it whole heartedly. McGill is a middle aged balding tough guy with a brain and a heart. The road he takes us on is one of mystery, sometimes violent, but always entertaining. Known to Evil is a book of twists and turns, brings emotions, anger and humor, sometiomes all at once. This charachter has great potential and I think we will be hearing much much more from him, at least I hope so!!! BRAVO Mr. Mosley yet another masterpiece.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Likable Leonid

    Know to Evil is also known to many implausible situations- too many to get a 4 star rating, yet the main character, PI Leonid McGill, saves the book with his likable character. You want him to succeed, even if you know that the situation he is in is so contrived as to be cartoonish.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 2, 2012

    Walter Mosley may be a phenomenon, according to the Houston Pres

    Walter Mosley may be a phenomenon, according to the Houston Press, but I can safely admit that Leonid McGill, the main character in Known to Evil, is a phenomenon in his own right. He’s a man with his own demons, multiple love interests, and an anvil for a fist. Leonid’s demons make him a character that practically bleeds off the page and into your living room, even though he’s a man that isn’t prone to do so. Much like the author, he gives everything he has, and then he adds a bit more. He puts others ahead of himself, and he takes to the streets with reckless abandon.

    The dialogue proved snappy and witty, and it practically popped of the page. Different characters stuttered in their speech, with commas in place to provide an added emphasis, which often gave the dialogue an added sense of realism, and it’s a writing technique not used by many writers, or at least ones that I’ve read. As a lover of noir crime fiction, books overflowing with action, and strong, male protagonists that can tie words into knots, I’ll be sure to add this author to my ever-growing list of treasured writers and seek out another Walter Moley novel in the not-so-distant future.

    This is a macho read from the first page to the last, but there’s a heart to it that would intrigue the opposite sex, further proving that Walter Mosley, as well as his relatively new protagonist, are forces not easily ignored. If you avoid this book and what could be a MANfiction label, you’ll do so at your own peril.

    Robert Downs
    Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator

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  • Posted July 8, 2011

    Great book

    Keeps you going wanting to know whats going to happen next

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  • Posted August 11, 2010

    Great Book

    Great Read. Mosley does it again.

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    Posted January 5, 2011

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    Posted January 10, 2011

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