Customer Reviews for

Kockroach (P.S. Series)

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A powerful yet gloomy parable

    The cockroach wakes up in a 1950s Times Square roach hotel to find somehow he no longer is a bug, but instead has become a male human. Though he is unhappy to devolve into a man, Kockroach is not concerned as his species understands survival of the fittest having been around since the dinosaur age and still thriving in the cement jungles in spite of weapons of mass destruction better known as human shoes.-------------- Kockroach takes the name of Jerry Blatta as he meets street punk Mickey 'Mite' Pimelia, who sees the transformed bug as a way to make a fortune in the world of gangs. However, Jerry notices that Mighty Mite is soft on crippled telephone operator Celia so he keeps that handy in case he needs to use this info. Celia finds the roach morality of survival is everything quite enticing. Meanwhile king Kockroach begins to climb his way to the top of the gangs as he understands inducing fear.------------- Tyler Knox cleverly satirizes Kafka's Metamorphosis and 1950s Noirs with this delightfully dark saga. The antihero sees the world through cockroach glasses as he realizes that humans run on fight (over possessions) or flight (out of fear). Thus combining 'moral' bug instincts with insightful clarity of the dreaded shoe stomping society he has joined, Blatta provides quite a vivid picture of the human condition, always one step away from the graveyard. Readers will appreciate this powerful gloomy parable.--------------- Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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