Customer Reviews for

Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 12 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    THERE IS NOTHING LIKE A DAME !

    As fascinating as a today tell-all Ladies of Liberty is full of vignettes and episodes that reveal the strength, courage and perseverance of America's early heroines. Not only are there personal revelations regarding many of these women but also reminders of how a young country struggled to grow. Sometimes with only a few sentences acclaimed journalist/commentator Cokie Roberts captures the essence of the women who played such an important role in our history. Among those included are Abigail Adams, Martha Jefferson, Dolley Madison, Martha Washington, Theodosia Burr, and Sacajawea. Strength was the hallmark of many in this sisterhood as we are reminded that for five years Boston born Abigail Adams was separated from her husband, John, while he attended to matters in France, Holland and England. As always during that period he relied upon her to be his faithful reporter of doings at home. Not only that but it was also her task to support their family by tending to their farm, selling whatever John sent from abroad, raise their young children, and care for ailing relatives. Of that period in his mother's life John Quincy Adams later wrote, 'My mother with her infant children dwelt, liable every hour of the day and night to be butchered in cold blood, or taken and carried to Boston as hostages.' It is quotations such as the above taken from journals, diaries, and personal letters that make the stories of these women so vivid as they fulfilled both their personal and public roles. It is a pleasure to listen to Cokie Roberts - she is a marvelous storyteller, casting a spell with her words and drawing us in. Ladies Of Liberty is a remarkable work and a valuable contribution to the annals of our history. Highly recommended. - Gail Cooke

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2012

    Going through school and studying history, too many times you fi

    Going through school and studying history, too many times you find yourself learning the same things over and over again. Only when you find a gifted teacher who likes to give out tidbits of information that is not in the summaries of historical events do you really get to know history and appreciate it. The same can be said for any historical book on the market. I have read several that revealed no more to me than I had learned twenty years earlier. Then there are the books that you could read over and over again. This is what I found in Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nationby Cokie Roberts.

    Mrs. Roberts has many years experience in the political world and took this to undertake the writing of Ladies of Liberty . When I first picked up this book, it was for the interesting title. Noticing who the author was kept me looking more at it. I originally thought it was going to just give me a more detailed look at the First Ladies of America. I discovered much more.

    If you want to truly know about the beginnings of America and what was going on in Washington, this is the book to read. It is through the social gatherings and the personal letters of the ladies of the New World that you learn what was really happening behind the historic events.

    The book begins not with the first president and his famous first lady. It begins with the Presidency of John Adams and his first lady, Abigail. In this first section you get introduced into more detail the first lady and all the women of Washington. How do they react to new arrivals in town? How do they feel regarding a new law or the social actions of others? All this is disclosed through personal letters and the interacting of the women and their husbands.

    As you go through the presidential terms ending with James Monroe, you learn who was really running the country. Though many have claimed that women have had no influence over the years as they were kept out of sight and out of mind, this books informs us how powerful these women really were.

    When Jefferson came into office, there was no first lady. His wife had died a few years before leaving him with two children to raise on his own. When he got into the White House (not called by that name at that time), he was not inclined toward parties and socializing. It did not take long for him to understand that the women of the new capital would not stand for it. The social gatherings where politics were really made were expected. Jefferson got a wake up call on the influence of the women of town and how much they could get accomplished.

    In reading, you will discover the bravery of women facing the British invading the capital. Learn how women banded together to help the poor and the orphans. Who started the Sunday School movement in America? Open the pages and find out.

    I was thrilled to read and re-read sections to gather information that was flowing forth. Mrs. Roberts does an excellent job of tying in the women of the period and showing the influence that they had upon the young country and how it affects us today. She even throws in a small section on recipes of dishes that could be found at a gathering of Dolley Madison's.

    Ladies of Liberty is a great historical read. Some sections are not light and might require a slower read since there is so much information to absorb. I highly recommend this book if you interested in early American history or even just the history of women in general.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    "Ladies of Liberty" is wonderful!

    The inspring stories of the women who helped found our nation -- their real lives and thoughts, not the history book version. Beautifully written and read by Ms. Roberts. After returning home from a trip, I sat in my garage listening, because I didn't want to wait until my next travel to finish the chapter!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2008

    Chic Lit at It's Best

    Fantastic Read! Inspirational, educational, and hard to put down. The story really flows. It is crazy to think that it is centered around 1800 DC - you realize that as things change so much stays the same. A MUST for summer reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    THERE IS NOTHING LIKE A DAME !

    As fascinating as a today tell-all Ladies of Liberty is full of vignettes and episodes that reveal the strength, courage and perseverance of America's early heroines. Not only are there personal revelations regarding many of these women but also reminders of how a young country struggled to grow. Sometimes with only a few pages acclaimed journalist/commentator Cokie Roberts captures the essence of the women who played such an important role in our history. Among those included are Abigail Adams, Martha Jefferson, Dolley Madison, Martha Washington, Theodosia Burr, and Sacajawea. Strength was the hallmark of many in this sisterhood as we are reminded that for five years Boston born Abigail Adams was separated from her husband, John, while he attended to matters in France, Holland and England. As always during that period he relied upon her to be his faithful reporter of doings at home. Not only that but it was also her task to support their family by tending to their farm, selling whatever John sent from abroad, raise their young children, and care for ailing relatives. Of that period in his mother's life John Quincy Adams later wrote, 'My mother with her infant children dwelt, liable every hour of the day and night to be butchered in cold blood, or taken and carried to Boston as hostages.' It is quotations such as the above taken from journals, diaries, and personal letters that make the stories of these women so vivid as they fulfilled both their personal and public roles. Reading the words of Cokie Roberts is very much like listening to her - she is a marvelous storyteller, casting a spell with her words and drawing us in. Ladies Of Liberty is a remarkable work and a valuable contribution to the annals of our history. Highly recommended. - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted April 10, 2010

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    Posted May 16, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2009

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 12 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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