Customer Reviews for

The Lady of Serpents

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2006

    Extreme Disapointment

    Normally I would not write a review, but I feel strongly about the disappointment in this book. The author cannot make up his mind in which direction he wishes to take this character, also he cannot make up his mind on how many characters he wishes to introduce. Not only is the reader left hanging after book one, they are left hanging after book two as well. It is apparent that book two was written in a rush with little known direction. Book One was a great story with great potential, Book Two failed miserably. Let us hope for better in Book Three. Mr. Clegg please get your act together and please deliver on what was promised in the first Book 'Priest of Blood'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2006

    I love The Vampyricon!

    It has been so long since I began reading a trilogy that's quite as remarkable as Douglas Clegg's The Vampyricon. The Priest of Blood (Book One) was an amazing medieval tale that turned to battles and vampires and ancient cities. In The Lady of Serpents, the world turns more and more toward dark fantasy as the break in the Veil brings shadow priests called White Robes to the new city, built for the Falconer's first love -- now, his great enemy. This is the most original take on the mythology of vampires -or vampyres, as Mr. Clegg puts it- that I have read in many years. The Lady of Serpents goes from the modern world to medieval France, all the way to the 'new' world. I can't wait to see how the Falconer and the tribe of vampires return in the third novel. This is unlike any trilogy I've read, and it just moves like a rocket. The last 80 pages alone is a novel by itself, set in what seems to be medieval Mexico. Usually middle books in a trilogy are a bit slow, but not The Lady of Serpents. This books is fast-paced and full of action and twists.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2006

    A fascinating Vampyricon tale

    When Aleric the Falconer was converted into a Vampyre many of his peers believed he was the hero who would lead them to the Promised Land as the savior ready to battle the likes of Enora the sorcerer and her minions. However, Aleric failed at his destiny when Enora captures him like she has done to so many other Vampyres. Humiliated and demeaned, he must survive by entertaining his captor by fighting in her arena refusal means a horrific death.----------------------- Aleric knows his race is losing hope so he must find a means to escape his incarceration. If he manages that impossible task, Aleric concludes her cannot defeat the sorcerer or the power behind her reign, an unknown alchemist¿ he needs to obtain help from to destroy Enora. He knows the only individual who can provide that, his enemy who seduced him into becoming an undead, Pythia, the Lady of Serpents.--------------------------- LADY OF SERPENTS is a fascinating Vampyricon tale starring a wonderful unsure hero struggling with the need to overcome his latest round of mistakes in order to achieve what most believes is his destiny. In many ways Enora is the more fascinating character with her evil use of prisoners as slaves, ¿entertainers¿, and cannon fodder, but will admires the filled with doubts Aleric still trying against all odds. Fans of vampire epics will appreciate this enjoyable fantasy while seeking out the Aleric¿s previous tale THE PRIEST¿S BLOOD.---------------------- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1