Customer Reviews for

The Last American Man

Average Rating 4
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(2)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Brilliantly written and insightful.

A must read. Conway is truly a throwback to the legend of the frontiersmen of America. What is so amazing is that he is living in the 21st century. Gilbert skillfully weaves his saga, providing insight into the dynamics of the man, his beliefs, his upbringing, and hi...
A must read. Conway is truly a throwback to the legend of the frontiersmen of America. What is so amazing is that he is living in the 21st century. Gilbert skillfully weaves his saga, providing insight into the dynamics of the man, his beliefs, his upbringing, and his struggle to reconcile his chosen lifestyle with the pop culture of present day America. It's enlightening, provocative, and Gilbert is an excellent writer. Everyone on my Christmas list is receiving a copy!

posted by Anonymous on September 26, 2002

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

One of the most annoying books ever written -- don't bother!

By the title I was expecting the story of an extremely exceptional man, however when I finished reading the book I thought the book should have been titled "the most despicable american man". The main character seems to have a very high opinion of himself and probably l...
By the title I was expecting the story of an extremely exceptional man, however when I finished reading the book I thought the book should have been titled "the most despicable american man". The main character seems to have a very high opinion of himself and probably lives in the woods because the rest of society would not build him up as Ms. Gilbert does. I don't think his ego could handle the lack of hero worship he would find among regular people. His standards for others are ridiculous, another example of his self-aggrandizement and another good reason for him to live apart from society. But I think perhaps the worst example of his self absorption is when he rides a horse 18 hours a day from North Carolina to California. By the time they arrived in California the horse was skin and bones as well as dehydrated. No horse should be subjected to such cruel and unusual treatment by such a self centered human being and he should have been ashamed of himself in the least or at best imprisoned for animal cruelty. Ms. Gilbert seems to be thoroughly obsessed by men in all of her writing. Perhaps she should try a year of living alone and focus on herself to really find herself.

posted by horsecorgi on October 4, 2010

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  • Posted October 4, 2010

    One of the most annoying books ever written -- don't bother!

    By the title I was expecting the story of an extremely exceptional man, however when I finished reading the book I thought the book should have been titled "the most despicable american man". The main character seems to have a very high opinion of himself and probably lives in the woods because the rest of society would not build him up as Ms. Gilbert does. I don't think his ego could handle the lack of hero worship he would find among regular people. His standards for others are ridiculous, another example of his self-aggrandizement and another good reason for him to live apart from society. But I think perhaps the worst example of his self absorption is when he rides a horse 18 hours a day from North Carolina to California. By the time they arrived in California the horse was skin and bones as well as dehydrated. No horse should be subjected to such cruel and unusual treatment by such a self centered human being and he should have been ashamed of himself in the least or at best imprisoned for animal cruelty. Ms. Gilbert seems to be thoroughly obsessed by men in all of her writing. Perhaps she should try a year of living alone and focus on herself to really find herself.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2004

    Skip it

    Conway may be a fascinating figure, but the writing leaves much to be desired. It's hard to separate fact from fiction as the New York City author positivly drools over Conway, and what she perceives to be Conway's inspired natural existence. Mixing her vague notions of How America Went Wrong with sappy environmentalism, what might have been an interesting biography is mired in poor writing and enchantment for the biographee. I abondonded the book before finishing it.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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