Customer Reviews for

The Last Disciple (Last Disciple Series #1)

Average Rating 4.5
( 30 )
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(18)

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2008

    Fantastic Read

    This is a wonderful read. A historical novel that will open your eyes to much of what early Christians faced during Nero's reign.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2005

    Brings the New Testament to life

    The authors do a wonderful job of bringing Roman history and New Testament history together in historical context. Moving between scenes provides the reader with anticipation for what may lie ahead.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great book, deep story plots and characters.. only one question

    I loved this book, I loved how it seamlessly jumped between characters, keeping me engrossed in the plot. It was informative about what it was like to live during that time period. However.. this book is written by "biblical scholars?" The book takes place 65 CE... and it states that there existed physical copies of John, Luke, Mark and Matthew? However, John's gospel wasn't suspected to be written until ~90CE? I'm no scholar on the topic, but I've studies academically biblical history. I suppose my disappointment was that since it was written by content experts, I thought it would be more historically accurate to help me understand the history more. There were a few things that weren't consistant in recorded history, so "academic" buyer beware. But, the discrepancies in historical fact sure make for a great book! I can't wait to read the second one.. Make it into an eBook!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2008

    Massive

    Hank Hanegraaf's unigue style of filling in the blanks and creating back story is the perfect mix with Biblical history. He has long been an inpspiration to unleashing the imagination. I particularly enjoyed the mystery of The Last Disciple - not wanting to figure it out - just to see where Hank would take it, and me.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2005

    Surprising...

    I loved this book. Since I have been very interested in 'biblical fiction' (or perhaps 'interpretation'), this book jumped off the shelf at me. I was disappointed when I got to the end, and it did just that- Ended. Then I realized it was a series- what a relief!! The stories seemed little choppy a first but begin to smooth out as the story and the characters unfold, then it really becomes a great read!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2005

    Bringing the New Testament to life

    Wow, what a way to learn your New Testament and be entertained at the same time. This book brings the Bible to life. It's one thing to hear how First Century Christians were persecuted for their beliefs but it takes on a new dimension when you meet these characters and follow their lives. The only dissapointment was that it ended with out the next book in the series out on the stands! If you've been reading the Left Behind Series, put them down and pick up the real story of the Tribulation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2005

    WOW! What a concept!

    While the story gets a little choppy at times as it's the first in a series, it does provide a very thought provoking and interesting read. I first purchased it on audio for my spouse. The audio version is definitely better as it smoothly transitions from story to story. The book, however, was wonderful for someone (as myself) who enjoys letting their imagination form the story instead of a reader's words.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2004

    conventional plot?

    It is great to read a book that, while fiction, closely weaves the story with historical events and the cultural realities of the Roman Empire in the first century. In this way, it differs vastly from the interpretation of Revelation as presented in the Left Behind series, which is set in a highly speculative future. It's ironic then, when those who side with the eschatology of the Left Behind books object to the fictional aspects of Hanegraaff's book. Another irony is one of the criticisms in the above Publisher's Weekly review. Yes, on occasion the dialogue is didactic; how else explain some of what the book teaches? Fortunately, these pieces of conversation come in sporadic and short doses, and it would appear that as this was the same method used far more exhaustively in The Da Vinci Code, readers in general don't mind too much. The greater irony, however, is the Publisher's Weekly reviewer's assertion that the plot is 'conventional'. Readers of The Last Disciple should read through some of the writings of Josephus to see how that famous historian recounts the events in Judea in May of 66. (Josephus: The Wars of The Jews, Book 2, Chapters 14 &15.) The storyline of the book, with its high points in drama and twists and turns, mirror those same events so closely that calling the plot conventional is like calling an American Civil War novel conventional for remaining faithful to historical events. And in the case of The Last Disciple, there doesn't seem much conventional about the political twists and turns and the injustices that the Roman governor Florus inflicted upon the Jews in his attempt to force the Jews to start a war that would hide his bad administration from Rome. The reviewer's assertion that 'even Vitas can't prevent the destruction of the Jewish Temple' seems equally uninformed, for two reasons. The fictional Vitas does have a hand in turning Florus away from Jerusalem; in the fictional setting as in the historical setting, it appeared at the end of May 66 that the war had been successfully averted. Furthermore, and as a direct result of temporarily averting the war, the destruction of the Temple by Roman legions does not even occur within the book, and certainly not within the historical time frame of the Jewish Wars that the book covers. How can it be then, that in this novel Vitas 'can't prevent the destruction of the Jewish Temple' when it wasn't even destroyed? It's almost like the reviewer simply read the cover copy and then flipped through The Last Disciple to find some passages to criticize. As those of us know who used this method in elementary school to save time on book reports, this rarely fools anyone. So read it, and judge for yourself! You won't regret it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2004

    Time to study

    If nothing else, this book should wake those lulled by the Left Behind series. The co-authors of 'The Last Disciple' provided an interesting perspective on the lives of first century Christians. Not sure if many of us today would be bold enough to face the arena, or stand to be tarred and burned, yet secure enough to endure knowing that the faith professed was real. I never really thought about what it must have been like to read John's epistles, or Matthew's account within the first 100 years of Christ's first advent. I am sure they were eagerly looking for Him to return. I am looking forward to the next book in the series. Until then, the studying continues!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2004

    A wonderful read

    This book is great. I'm only 1/3 of the way through is and I can't put it down. Have any of us thought about 64AD before? We've heard the Christians were persecuted, but to read this authors account of it is horrifying and disturbing. Hank Hannegraaff is a wonderful Christian and truly has put together with Sigmund Brouwer a great masterpiece. Thanks to both of them

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2004

    A must read for seekers of the truth!

    I have alwys questioned the current Christian mainstream belief of the last days as described in the Book of the Revelation. This book has given me new insight. It makes more sense to me than the end times events as described in the Left Behind series. I can't wait for the next book to come out. Great job!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Fascinating historical fiction

    In 65 AD Nero rules Rome with an iron fist; since the Great Fire he persecutes Christians who refuse to accept that he is divine blaming the inferno on them. Vilas, a trusted advisor, knows the emperor is mad, and does his best to curb the worst of the excesses. He especially tries to save Christians who Nero is about to kill. Believers of Christ think Nero is the Beast and this is the time of the tribulation.................... Vilas is sick of war and the blood on his hands so he goes to Jerusalem to report on the Roman in charge of Judea, who is thought to have committed crimes against the Empire. In Judea, Vilas asks Sophia, the former Jewish slave he freed, to marry him although she is Christian and he is part of Nero¿s inner circle. They agree to hide her religion when they return to Rome as a married couple. However, Vilas has enemies who see his wife as the instrument to destroy him. At the same time, John the Revelator who is the last living disciple is in danger as he comforts incarcerated Christians. John and Vilas meet as both flee the wrath of the Beast................. THE LAST DISCIPLE depicts Nero as the Beast of Revelations as he persecutes Christians. The period is when people still living can provide eye witness accounts about the miracles Jesus performed. Vilas is a terrific representative of the age as he tries to remain loyal to the Empire, but detests the ruler he believes is destroying it. Much historical information is included in this biblical thriller so that readers obtain a taste of life in the first decades following the crucifixion in Rome and Judea, which makes for an enthralling read.................... Harriet Klausner

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    Posted March 26, 2011

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    Posted January 21, 2009

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    Posted July 7, 2011

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    Posted June 21, 2010

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    Posted April 27, 2011

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    Posted January 29, 2011

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