Customer Reviews for

The Last Stormlord (Stormlord Series #1)

Average Rating 4
( 80 )
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(37)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Glenda Larke is Phenomenal

In Glenda Larke's Last Stormlord, the world is a harsh and unforgiving place. The setting is very reminiscent of the Middle East, where water is not so easy to come by. In The Quartern, all water is provided by Stormlords, men and women born with an affinity towards wat...
In Glenda Larke's Last Stormlord, the world is a harsh and unforgiving place. The setting is very reminiscent of the Middle East, where water is not so easy to come by. In The Quartern, all water is provided by Stormlords, men and women born with an affinity towards water. Those with enough power are able to bring water from the distant ocean and create storms to rain throughout the four quarters of the land called Quartern. As time has passed, fewer and fewer rainlords and stormlords are being born, while not too far in the past several children with vast promise disappeared. The violent nomads of the Red Quarter are trying to bring back the "time of random rain" in which their nomadic ways served them well. This series starts on the back-stabbing, plots, and counter-plots of the few remaining Rainlords, and invariably, just like a dustdevil, sucks in two youths,who may one day be their saviors.
The first, a boy named Shale, is from the lowest levels of society, without even a daily water allotment and a drunken,jobless father. Shale knows that he is different from the other desert outcasts, and if he could learn just how different he was, he might find that he could be the savior of his people.
Terelle, the second child, was sold into the life of a snuggery maid, or courtesan, a life she would do anything to avoid. Unfortunately for her, she is about to come into womanhood soon. She makes her escape from Madam Opal, and is taken in by an elderly waterpainter with some mysteries of his own.
The supporting characters in this book really make the Quartern come alive. Glenda Larke's excellent storytelling has the reader actually experiencing the burning sun, constant heat, and ever-present thirst. In fact, after finishing this one, I placed an order to Australia to get some other books written by her while I wait the next installment titled Stormlord Rising!

posted by ir0nli0nzi0nzbee on March 6, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Passionate Potential Couldn't Hold Water

I just couldn't buy an entire civilization that refused to seek out new horizons, explore beyond the status quo of barely enough water to survive in a desert, enabling themselves like addicts completely dependent on their next fix of water from their stormlord. I admit,...
I just couldn't buy an entire civilization that refused to seek out new horizons, explore beyond the status quo of barely enough water to survive in a desert, enabling themselves like addicts completely dependent on their next fix of water from their stormlord. I admit, the water magic system intrigued, but did not wow me. It reminded me of a psi-power system more so than an actual magic system.

All the characters fairly brimmed with potential to entice me to care about their predicaments and futures. Something just didn't gel though, beyond the normal revulsion for obviously despicable villains and those cowardly scheming opportunists that waffle in the wind. The good characters lacked something, but I can't put my finger on it. Convincing passion? Believable choices? Inspired intelligence?

For the rest of my review, please visit GoodReads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/102991139

posted by JonMoss on July 2, 2010

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  • Posted July 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Passionate Potential Couldn't Hold Water

    I just couldn't buy an entire civilization that refused to seek out new horizons, explore beyond the status quo of barely enough water to survive in a desert, enabling themselves like addicts completely dependent on their next fix of water from their stormlord. I admit, the water magic system intrigued, but did not wow me. It reminded me of a psi-power system more so than an actual magic system.

    All the characters fairly brimmed with potential to entice me to care about their predicaments and futures. Something just didn't gel though, beyond the normal revulsion for obviously despicable villains and those cowardly scheming opportunists that waffle in the wind. The good characters lacked something, but I can't put my finger on it. Convincing passion? Believable choices? Inspired intelligence?

    For the rest of my review, please visit GoodReads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/102991139

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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