BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Last Week: What the Gospels Really Teach about Jesus's Final Days in Jerusalem

Average Rating 4.5
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted April 8, 2010

    Another masterpiece from Marcus Borg and John Dominic Crossan

    Again, two of our great contemporary Christian scholars and teachers have put together an important resource for the Christian religious community. I bought it specifically to help encourage my preaching for Holy Week and Easter Sunday, and it didn't fail to do just that! I have always been inspired by the work of these scholars, and hoped I would find new perceptions for understanding the final days of Jesus' life that would inspire my thinking for this high point of our Christian faith. Borg and Crossan have taken another look and approach that opens up different possibilities in which to view these crucial days for our life of faith. Whether you agree with their approach to the historical Jesus or not, there are a lot of provoking insights that will strengthen and encourage faith and faith-filled preaching and thinking. If nothing else, it should inspire a creative spirit to go beyond the trite to consider different possibilities and a broader context for the events of Holy Week and Easter. It's very accessible and easily understood.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 22, 2009

    Great perspective and context

    What I appreciated most about the book is the way it puts the events recorded in Mark into their historical and political context. Their conclusions about the meaning of events, seen in light of this context, could be upsetting to many. In our study group, it seemed most people found it challenging, not threatening. There is a definite agenda to challenge the notion of "substitutionary sacrifice," however even with a great deal of discussion in our group, we didn't feel an alternative understanding of Easter was made clear. The books greatest strength was its message that Jesus' mission and passion was less about the afterlife and far more about realizing God's kingdom on earth. If we are to follow Jesus, we are to follow Him in that mission. Wouldn't this be a better world if people of faith were more focused on that? If anything, the book could have pushed that message even more.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 30, 2013

    Very insightful! Especially as a Lenten reading

    Once again, the authors have provided excellent insight in to what was actually going on with Jesus and his followers. I learned more of what lead to many decisions by the Roman leaders, and why the crowds eventually turned on Jesus. As a modern day Christian, it is hard to imagine or understand the subtext of what happened, as reported in the Gospels, but the authors provided great insights as to the "whys" I have often had when reading the Gospels.

    Not a fast page turner, but is was very thought provoking-especially when read during Lent.

    Also check out "First Christmas" by the same authors. Also a good read for Advent.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2007

    A reviewer

    My title for this review comes from a paragraph that Borg and Crossan make near the end of this extremely interesting book. The authors start their conclusion of this book with, ¿We shall highlight their [Mark¿s narratives] meaning as parable, as truth-filled stories, without any intrinsic denial of their factuality. We are convinced that the truth claims of these stories matter most.¿ What struck me about this comment 'near the end of the book' is that this is an odd stance given their circuitous route to convince the reader that these things did not really occur as the gospels claim. The overall implication is that there is a great degree of Jewish and Roman political upheaval occurring, and the man, Jesus, is more a victim of imperial terrorism, than a ¿ransom for many.¿ The authors claim that, ¿Mark¿s gospel has an apocalyptic eschatology,¿ meaning that Mark expects, ¿dramatic and decisive divine intervention in the near future.¿ This has important significance with respect to Jesus as the anti-imperialist leader of the Jewish resistance, but this event has little to do with either resurrection, or saving grace. Again, the political turmoil is of paramount importance. Additionally, with a leader committed to passivity, the turmoil should not be a savage war, like the future destruction of Jerusalem and the Jewish Temple. Rather, ¿as followers of Jesus¿, this community was ¿committed to nonviolence,¿ while being in direct ¿opposition to imperial domination.¿ This Markan position is purely conjecture. The authors don¿t analyze other motives, or possibilities. Indeed, the anti-imperialist role is the only possibility that Borg and Crossan explore. The authors chose wisely to avoid examining the endless number of possibilities that could result from random guesswork. As the book progresses, Borg and Crossan continue in their preference for conjecture. In fact, several pages are devoted to promoting the possibility that Mark viewed participation in the death of Jesus as the main transformational goal in the lives of the disciples. ¿It is not by Jesus substituting for them, but by their participating in Jesus.¿ Here, after all of this conjecture, I realized that even this phrase, ¿participating in Jesus¿ has no conceptual definition. What conclusions can the reader possible draw from such a vague sentence? So, after all of this semi-historical evaluation, the reader is left considering whether these authors are convinced of their position, or not. Could they actually muster a strong denial of the historical veracity of these gospel accounts? Apparently not, otherwise, I¿m sure they may have given it a whole-hearted attempt. What they do succeed in accomplishing is asking enough questions and raising enough historical ambiguity to cast the reader into state of wonderment. All the way down to this closing comment ¿ ¿the truth claims of these stories matter most.¿ What could these men possibly mean by ¿truth.¿ Either, there is historical truth, or there is not. To cast a Cinderella-like pall upon the gospels and claim that the story proves that ¿stepsisters should be nice to one another¿ makes the summary of this book a disappointing, although interesting, read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 19, 2013

    Highly recommend

    There was a woman who actually believed the story before it was played out. Peter and the others had no idea what their Rabbi was saying. That is the essence of the Last Week. And, no, her name was not Mary the Magdalena.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2013

    Must read.

    Gives new and deepp understanding of HOlY WEEK. Very well written.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2012

    Excellent!

    This is a great work, reviewing, studying, and "exegeting" the last week of the earthly life of Jesus Christ, principally as recounted in the Gospel of Mark. I read it as daily devotionals for Holy Week this year, and it was a great way to observe this most-important week of the Christian calendar. I highly recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    Fantastic Read!

    A "should read" for all Christians.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1