Customer Reviews for

Letters From Home

Average Rating 4.5
( 45 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(34)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Beautifully written and very engaging book

The first thing I have to say about this book is the fact that it really felt like I was in the 1940s in the midst of WWII. Ms. McMorris does a fabulous job of setting the tone and setting of the book. I felt like she really did her research from the way the characters ...
The first thing I have to say about this book is the fact that it really felt like I was in the 1940s in the midst of WWII. Ms. McMorris does a fabulous job of setting the tone and setting of the book. I felt like she really did her research from the way the characters talked to the various settings, they just felt right. No accidental usage of current slang to take me out of the moment. The era is the book is wonderfully done. Next is the characters. I love Liz and Julia and Betty grew on me. Betty seemed a little stuck on herself at first but as I read more about her I started liking her more and more. Liz seems to be the star of this book while still having storylines involving Julia and Betty. I am in hopes that more books will follow and will tell the continuing stories of Julia and Betty. In this book Liz is engaged, but then she meets Morgan the night before he heads off to serve in the war. Then she sees him with Betty and gives up on the feelings she felt. Then the curveball is thrown when Betty asks Liz to write to Morgan for her since she doesn't know what to say. A relationship grows through the letters and leads to the main storyline of the book. I found the letters fascinating and a wonderful way to get to know the characters. The letters are interspersed with accounts from each of the characters lives and it's a great way to get to know all the main players in the book and also to see life on the home front and on the front lines. The focus is on the characters though and how they grow and change during the book because of the way they affect one another. The book is beautifully written and completely captivating. I hated putting it down to do other things and was anxious to pick it back up. I could read it in a busy room with no problem, that was how engrossed I would become in the book. The romance is sweet, the end is great, the tension building is wonderfully done and I just can't gush enough about this book. This is Ms. McMorris' debut and I can't wait to see what she writes next.

posted by crystal_fulcher on March 21, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Good story

Reminds me of the feeling of waiting for that special someone to mail you a letter, something our kids will never understand in this world where we are all connected constantly by cell phones, computers, etc...

posted by 7075569 on February 21, 2012

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Posted March 21, 2011

    Beautifully written and very engaging book

    The first thing I have to say about this book is the fact that it really felt like I was in the 1940s in the midst of WWII. Ms. McMorris does a fabulous job of setting the tone and setting of the book. I felt like she really did her research from the way the characters talked to the various settings, they just felt right. No accidental usage of current slang to take me out of the moment. The era is the book is wonderfully done. Next is the characters. I love Liz and Julia and Betty grew on me. Betty seemed a little stuck on herself at first but as I read more about her I started liking her more and more. Liz seems to be the star of this book while still having storylines involving Julia and Betty. I am in hopes that more books will follow and will tell the continuing stories of Julia and Betty. In this book Liz is engaged, but then she meets Morgan the night before he heads off to serve in the war. Then she sees him with Betty and gives up on the feelings she felt. Then the curveball is thrown when Betty asks Liz to write to Morgan for her since she doesn't know what to say. A relationship grows through the letters and leads to the main storyline of the book. I found the letters fascinating and a wonderful way to get to know the characters. The letters are interspersed with accounts from each of the characters lives and it's a great way to get to know all the main players in the book and also to see life on the home front and on the front lines. The focus is on the characters though and how they grow and change during the book because of the way they affect one another. The book is beautifully written and completely captivating. I hated putting it down to do other things and was anxious to pick it back up. I could read it in a busy room with no problem, that was how engrossed I would become in the book. The romance is sweet, the end is great, the tension building is wonderfully done and I just can't gush enough about this book. This is Ms. McMorris' debut and I can't wait to see what she writes next.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 17, 2011

    Loved It- Great for readers from 18-108!

    Letters From Home takes us back to 1944 where, amid the heartache of WWII, three young women explore issues of friendship, honesty, loss and the need to follow one's heart. Told with uncompromising attention to historical detail; McMorris successfully blurs the line between fact and fiction. Beautifully written with rich characters and a touch of romance; this timeless tale will touch readers from 18 to 108.

    This book opened up discussions with my parents about their own postcard courtship! It is a good story for pulling generations together. Good to share with family or reading groups.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 10, 2011

    Highly recommended.

    Heart warming. Could not put down until finished.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

    Excellent

    I wish I had my dads letters home. He told me that he wrote home every chance .... that all he prayed for was to make it home. He met my mother after his service ... so I do not know what became of his letters.

    This story was beautiful. Although fiction, it touched my heart because of the many feelings expressed by those touched by the war. My father rarely spoke of his experiences in Europe. His death left many unanswered questions about his heroic service. Reading this story helped me feel him again.

    Loved this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    Really Enjoyed

    I really enjoyed reading this one. It made me see what my grandparents may have gone through during WWII. It was a great book. Makes me want to read more stories on WWII. It did have the romance factor, but gave me an insight to what life was like during that time.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Good story

    Reminds me of the feeling of waiting for that special someone to mail you a letter, something our kids will never understand in this world where we are all connected constantly by cell phones, computers, etc...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 13, 2011

    Great read!

    A very enjoyable story that is set during world war 2. McMorris made it easy to fall in love with the characters and hard to put down.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Aleisha

    This book dragged way to long, it did not get good until chapter 8 to me

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2012

    Good read.

    This was a wonderful love story and so much more, set during World War II. My parents were sweethearts during this time so I knew how important letters to each other while separated. I never really though about all of the ramafications the war caused. And most veterans that I have known never wanted to relive their experiences by talking about it. This novel kept my attention throughout and I couldn't put it down as I wanted to know what the ending would be. I was sad to see the novel come to a close. It kept me thinking long after what was to happen with Julia, Betty, Liz and Morgan. I highly recommend this.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The Nostaligia of World War II

    Kristina McMorris has hit a home run out of the ball park with this, her debut novel. Letters From Home centers around three female friends who are all out for the evening at a USO club in Chicago in 1944. Liz who is almost engaged to her childhood friend Dalton, has her life mapped out; Julia who is engaged to sailor Christian and who gives up a shot at being a fashion editor for Vogue; and Betty the blonde bombshell singer at the USO who is every guy's fantasy but who is searching for more to her life than slinging hash at a neighborhood diner. Enter the McLain brothers, Morgan and Charlie, who are shipping out the next morning. At first glance Morgan falls for the sedate brunette Liz but ends up 'saving' Betty by pretending to be her fiance. As a thank you, Betty gives him her photo with her address on it and invites him to write to her. Unbeknownst to anyone else, Liz deals with her strong instant attraction to Morgan but quashes it when she spots him in a clinch with Betty. That is where the story begins. Where it gets interesting is when Morgan, now in Europe, writes to Betty. Betty hasn't given him a second thought and is cajoles Liz into writing a return letter for her. Liz caves in, writes the letter, and signs Betty's name. An exchange of letters between Morgan and Betty/Liz ensues for the remainder of the war. The correspondents open their hearts to each other and in time fall in love; Liz with Morgan and Morgan with Betty. The author has woven a time-honored story with well developed characters that we learn to care about from the first page. Her descriptions of war-time events and military hospitals is spot-on. The reactions of the characters to their personal dilemmas makes the reader empathize with their choices and the consequences. Ms. McMorris shifts our attention from the European to the Pacific Theaters of War seamlessly. We are never lost or left hanging. While Ms. McMorris used the real-life correspondence between her own grandparents as inspiration for this story, I found myself comparing her characters to my own parents who were married shortly before my father was drafted. I was drawn into the story and couldn't put the book down - in fact I resented any intrusion on my reading. I heartily recommend Letters From Home to anyone who had relatives in WWII and to readers of historical fiction. I hope to read more from this promising author.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2014

    Great WWII love stories

    Highly recommend if you enjoy stories from this era.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2014

    Shade

    Sits on his bed and waits for people to come. He plays on his Ipod.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2013

    !!

    Best. Book. In a very long time. Loved it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2013

    Amazing

    I could not stop reading this book!!! Such a wonderful story in the midst of a war!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2012

    This book was great! the romance was so cute! I was instantly su

    This book was great! the romance was so cute! I was instantly sucked into the story. The characters were so believable and the story line was excellent. I would definitely recommend this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Amazing!! Simply Amazing!

    This book was amazing!! Truly amazing!! Makes me wish I lived back in that time, it was nice to see Betty grow up and mature while in the WAS and it was nice to see Liz and Morgan fall in love, the simplicity of relationships back then, and how it did not take forever for someone to know true love, I have that with my husband but nowadays that is a very rare thing. Was sad to see Charlie pass on, but as with any good story someone must meet a tragic end. I wish that Julia and Ian would have maybe helped each other heal over Christians death, they had a very good chemistry. Loved this book, and I would recommend it to everyone!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 18, 2011

    Great read!

    This is her first book! She has another one coming out next year sometime! So awesome and excited for my cousin! It was a great love story! Wish her the best!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A Wonderful Debut Novel From Kristina McMorris

    What a lovely debut novel from Kristina McMorris. Heartwarming and tender, it takes you on an epic journey through World War II, chronicling the lives and loves of four friends. Definitely a must read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 16, 2011

    Heartwarming and magical

    This is a wonderful fascinating glimpse into the lives of three young ladies during WW2 and the men who they loved. Each girl had a different story, but all were tastefully weaved together to form a beautiful tapestry of romance, war, hardship, and adventure.
    I found myself gripped from the first chapter and found it hard to put it down. I usually do not read WW2 novels, but I found myself completed immersed into the time period. Reaching the last page was a sad event, for I wasn't ready for the story to be over. I reread the last three pages at least five times before finally closing the book. With each reading of the last sentence came the "sigh."
    Kristina McMorris has managed to turn me into a WW2 romance novel lover.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 11, 2011

    Ever Know a WWII Vet?

    Do you have any relations, living or deceased, who served in World War II? If you think not, are you sure? After all, over 16 million Americans served in uniform during the war. That's not to mention the millions who worked to arm, equip, transport, or otherwise support them. And this at a time when the population was less than half today's; about 139 million. Chances are you are recently descended from someone greatly affected by this monumental conflict.

    Have you ever wondered about them, how living scenes we can only imagine when seeing them in the movies really felt? Well, Kristina McMorris, upon discovering a treasure trove of letters between her grandparents, did. And the rest of us are blessed by her curiosity, and the resultant labor of love she crafted in Letters From Home.

    The book opens with a simple enough hook: a chance meeting before a soldier ships off to war, a couple feels a spark in one another's presence, in touching; the simple pangs of love at first sight. Through a simple misunderstanding they are separated before exploring their feelings, or even exchanging surnames, let alone contact information. McMorris's simplicity is deceptively entangling, for both the couple, Liz and Morgan, and for the reader. Fate intervenes, and Liz is offered a chance to continue her connection with Morgan (Mac), off fighting in Europe, via letters from home. The hitch, thereby the novel's true hook: to do so, Liz must assume another woman's identity to keep Mac's letters coming-and that woman is her friend and roommate.

    Do you ever think society is worse off for the disappearance of letter-writing? I'm not talking emails or tweets-I refer to the composing of one's thoughts and emotions in writing, in ink, specifically to connect with another. If so, you have a second reason to read this book. The language McMorris uses in Liz's and Mac's letters is so powerful, so beautifully written, I found myself longing for the next one, just as do Liz and Mac in the story.

    The novel is multi-layered, introducing a whole series of era-specific issues via the secondary characters and plots. Issues like women's changing roles, both in the armed services and on the home front, the shame of battle fatigue, and the dehumanizing and tragic impact of war and death on the psyche of its survivors. McMorris skillfully renders battle scenes, both gripping and heartrending. I consider myself well-read on the war and the era, and found her attention to detail impeccable. The dialog rings true and period-correct, but still relatable to a modern audience.

    The final weaving of the various far-flung characters and story elements is masterful. I confess myself the son of a WWII combat vet, which may have some bearing on my feelings. But I found Letters From Home to be a sweeping, romantic, and powerfully moving page-turner. A must read for anyone who ever knew or wondered about a relative who survived or died as a result of one the world's most arduous trials. They don't call them The Greatest Generation for nothing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3