Customer Reviews for

The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization

Average Rating 3.5
( 45 )
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Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 46 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2002

    The "New World Order" [sic] Defined

    Even if you have little knowledge of economics, "The Lexus and the Olive Tree" explains Globalization and its effects on the populations of the world. This work attempts to teach the reader many aspects of economics while at the same time giving economic explanations for various historical events. With Middle Eastern terrorists knocking on US doors, this is a MUST READ for any American. Could "Baywatch" be the reason behind the WTC tragedy?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2002

    Financial story is weak, politics insightful

    Tom is a political writer with deep insight and the experience to make that insight 'real' and available to the reader. But as a financial historian, analyst and would-be forecaster, he's weak. Just one example out of many: the creation and breakdown of the Bretton Woods infrastructure goes totally unmentioned, even though that was the triggering event and in many ways the driving force in the financial changes of the last 30 years: the reaction of Europe to the loss of the stability of the BW era drove the creation of the EU and ultimately the Euro; the takeover of international exchange processes by private corporations and dealers from the central banks who managed currency trading in the BW era drove the massive privatization of state-owned assets and the collapse of economies incapable of that privatizaion, as central banks could no longer act to protect and offset inefficient policy; the elimination of trade restraints and protectionism as functional and workable policy systems followed the collaspe of BW as competitiveness overtook complacency in the international market and investment capital migrated to the most efficient. Tom's overly simplistic financial vision does not match he highly sophistocated political senses, given this book an unbalanced feel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2001

    Economic Globolization

    The Lexus and the Olive Tree is a great book that describes the effects of globalization on the economy. The Lexus symbolizes the new system of economics which has the new and improved technology, and information about almost anything. The olive tree is the old way or the economy without the new technology and information and Finance. The basic idea of this book is globalization and how the world will have to adapt to it or get left behind.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2001

    Will they ever be in equilibrium? The balance between the Lexus and the Olive Tree.

    A profoundly descriptive investigation of the most significant trend in the world today, The Lexus and the Olive Tree represents an interaction between the modern system of globalisation and the historical forces of tradition, culture, and community. This book is essential for anyone who appreciates and wants to expand his or her knowledge on the issue of global integration. Although it may be a little more demanding on students, it will provide the seasoned professional with many tools needed to understand this changing global economy within which we live.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2001

    No, Not Orange Juice--Oranges!

    Thomas L. Friedman has done it again. The impossibility of restricting information in the Internet age, the impracticality of slowing down innovation in the computer age, and the futility of forbidding foreign investment in the international-banking age are the main themes that run through this well-written study of globalization and its consequences for our increasingly fast-paced, increasingly smaller planet. This book is head and shoulders above the usual state-of-the-world-for-the-educated-masses sort of thing. It's fun, lively and even self-deprecating (as when Friedman shares his addiction to oranges with us and the trouble he has communicating with room services that he wants not orange slices or orange juice, but whole ORANGES!). Undoubtedly many people will disagree with Friedman's thesis that technology in its global reach will encourage the production of goods and services 'farther, faster, deeper and cheaper'--or, even so, many believe that our production and consumption habits may be killing us, not only from an ecological but from a spiritual point of view. But despite its relentless optimism 'The Lexus and the Olive Tree' is a thoughtful study and deserves to be read. The new paperback has been updated.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2000

    Balanced, Insightful Review of Upsides and Pitfalls of Globalization

    Friedman shares his rich experience of traveling the world and interviewing people from all walks of life, with illustrative anecdotes on the effects of globalization. This book has prompted me to change my view of certain aspects of globalization, and has broadened my perspective. This book is a must-read for anyone trying to understand what's going on in the world today, and trying to make a living in societies very much in a state of flux.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2000

    A Practical In Depth Look at the New World

    The Lexus and the Olive Tree is a superb work showing the insight of what impact the globalization means today as the basis for the future. Mr. Friedman´s in depth knowledge of world affairs provides practical and concise information so that the reader can easily identify with the latest trends both in business and personal affairs. The book also brings out the social impact that the new world order will have in our societies. Very well organized and full of facts for practical use and research.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2000

    An uninspired effort

    This book is an 'I love me book' discussing the authors many travels as a foreign correspondent couched as an analysis of globalization. His ideas are straightforward at best, and he uses the words 'I' and 'me' at a remarkable rate.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2000

    What do you really learn here?

    What do you really learn here? When I was in graduate school 25 years ago multinational corporations like ITT led by Harold Geneen were the concept; today we call that concept, globalization. But what is new? Sure, free trade may have accelerated due to the end of communism and the rise of the Internet but the concept is still the same old one. It seems to me the book is an extremely muddled book about free trade; something about which an increasing majority of economists have increasingly agreed with since the depression. We now know that if you can trade freely with only those within 100 miles of your house you will have a standard of living of: X; and if you can trade with anyone anywhere in the world you will have a standard of living of 1000X. Friedman's attempt to breath new life in to this old concept with metaphors about fine new technology automobiles and old fashioned olive trees just buries the real issue. Sure there are temporary losers, in the global competition to enrich consumers, and those who regret the loss or diminution of their olive tree cultures as globalization proceeds but this has been the case for literally 1000s of years. One can even argue that the modest acceleration of today's globalization is sweet, and modest as compared to many that have come before from the likes of Alexander, Caesar, Attila, Napoleon, Hitler, Marx, Jesus, Jefferson, and Reagan. I suppose in the end this book appeals to Democrats who don't have a clear cut idea about basic economic principles. To them there is no history and each event (globalization for example) must be understood and managed anew by the gov't. For Republicans historic truths are clear; the gov't just needs to get out of the way or to encourage individual liberty. Milton Friedman's book: 'Capitalism and Freedom' is the classic to understand the pure economics of free trade, or, Understanding The Difference between Democrats and Republicans is the best to understand the relationship of freedom to political parties.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 1999

    Cheerleading for a Vicious System

    Reading Friedman I feel as if I were reading an old-style Soviet journalist singing the praises of Stalinism. As Friedman interviews the capitalist elite, they jointly portray capitalism as a basically splendid system -- not surprisingly since it has been good to them. Stalinism too seemed wonderful to the Stalinist elite. But just as the late unlamented Soviet regime appeared less than splendid to the majority of Soviet citizens, so does the global capitalist regime strike a steadily increasing number of the earth's inhabitants as hardly the type of society we want for ourselves or our children. We see capitalism as an uncivilized system of organized greed which is devastating the planet and destroying people's health, dignity, rights, and liberty. Capitalism does not need to be celebrated, it needs to be replaced by a humane and democratic global community. We the people of the world -- and not the profit-driven corporate globalizers -- must be the ones to accomplish that.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 1999

    Review

    Our Olive Tree in today's society is very well present and has been for ages. The Lexus is nothing much than an improved society as it is increased in technology and marketing. The author states that in economics, less developed countries tend to focus on nurturing their own national industries. In old economic systems the only threat a nation had was from its closest neighbors taking away from you. But now in this new Lexus system, many nations are threatened by anonymous, transitional, standardizing marketing forces and technologies that make up today's economic system. The global system has become a threat on the face of this earth. Society will be forced to adapt to changes or struggle to keep up with developed nations. We must constantly build a better Lexus or economic system to drive it out into the world. We must be able to function in any nation and we must become more united in this global system if there is any hope for a positive future.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 1999

    Capitalism in the world

    Capitalism has given birth to the capitalist world economy, which has the domoinated nation. Our Olive tree in today's society is very well present and has been for ages. Due to the Lexus or may I say our new and improved economy, technology, and marketing forces e.t.a The global system has become a threat on the face of the earth. The economic global system is changing and we realize it everyday. Society will be forced to flow with these changes or keep up with the paste. There is a gateway, it is connecting. We must become more united in this global system.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 1999

    The lexus and the olive tree

    The lexus and the olive tree is a very good book.This book preaches the gospel of globalization.Friedman uses a lot of metaphors and illustrations, which were very helpful and made the book easier to understand.Like pariables in the Holy books his stories contain deeper meanings,which everyone can relate to.Overall the book really gives a good insight on what is going on in the world today and I would recommend this book for all students of business and business owners.

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    Posted January 25, 2010

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 46 Customer Reviews
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