Customer Reviews for

Liquor

Average Rating 4
( 15 )
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5 Star

(9)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2005

    LOVED THIS SO MUCH!!!

    I read this in one sitting last night, and it saved my life! Poppy is such a wonderful novelist, and I absolutely fell in love with Rickey and G-Man and the rest of the crew. You will seriously be missing out if you don't give this great book a chance! It kept me up until 3AM.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2004

    A real look at New Orleans

    I came to this book with no knowledge of Poppy Brite's former work; only bought it because a clerk at my favorite local bookstore reccomended it so highly. Read it in one night and loved it. People who complain about the dialogue in this book have certainly never been to New Orleans and probably get their ideas about the city from movies like 'The Big Easy.' Unlike Dennis Quaid, the characters in 'Liquor' talk the way you can hear New Orleans natives talking on the street every day. I've read no novel that captured the flavor of our speech so well since 'A Confederacy of Dunces.' (Hardly surprising, since I notice 'Liquor' is dedicated to its author.) I wasn't a Brite fan before, but I am now.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2004

    So what if it isn't horror?

    I was lucky to score an early copy of Liquor by Poppy z. Brite this past weekend. The novel follows a young couple, John Rickey and Gary 'G-Man' Stubbs, from the hot lines at various New Orleans restaurant kitchens to opening their own, a genius spirit infused joint called Liquor, where the alcohol is not only served at the bar but in all of the dishes as well. There aren't a lot of twists and turns, but I think the plot is secondary to her character work, which in my opinion is really well done. For me the book moved like a steamroller, building momentum slowly, but once it got going it was hard to stop. Though most fans probably know Mrs. Brite for her horror novels, Lost Souls, Drawing Blood, and Exquisite Corpse, it's in Liquor where she truly shines. Liquor feels a lot more personal and involved, through her descriptions of her hometown and her well-drawn characters, than her previous novels, I think because there isn¿t a genre looming over head and restricting her. I think this novel will appeal to those who enjoy Anthony Bourdain's writing or Gregory Mcdonald's Fletch series of novels, as well as anyone who has a love of good food and believable, interesting character work.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2004

    A Treat

    As a moody teen I was raised on Poppy Z. Brite's gothic, teen-slick horror fiction of the early '90's. I loved the sprawling, menacing descriptions of Brite's shadow-drenched deep South, the references to all the cool goth bands I loved, the graphic sex scenes and all the oh-so-cool pretty-boy characters. I am not being facetious, I legitimately loved it all and still hold an affection for it; it was good writing no matter how slick it was. As a 20-something working class schlub, I thought I left Brite's writing far behind me. But 'Liquor''s brightly-colored paperback caught my eye in the bookstore one day, and I thought, 'What the hell, for old times sake, let's relive the simpler times.' Imagine my surprise to find that 'Liquor' is not only great literature, it represents a completely different writing style by Brite. The murky, depraved darkness of 'Exquisite Corpse' is replaced by a more realistic, folksy gentility-- there are some dark parts and melodramatic moments, but for the most part it's a tight narrative, it's humanistic and it can be enjoyed on some level by everyone. The gothic dreamworld of New Orleans in Early Brite Land has given way to a practical, meticulously detailed, honest but still fascinating portrayal of a real, unique American city. Once known for trendy, stand-off-ish, dark loner characters, Rickey and G-Man and the 'Liquor' ensemble (including some strong, interesting female characters, also new to Brite Land) are immediately recognizable , identifiable and likeable; layered to a degree, but not realistic. Brite herself admitted once that dialogue was not her strong suit, but you couldn't tell with 'Liquor', where there are massive exchanges of breezy, succinct, humorous barbs. I think Brite has successfully followed in the tradition of the writer of her favorite novel (and one of my favorites), 'A Confederacy of Dunces' by James Kennedy Toole. So I recommend this book for Brite fans, New Orleans fans, 'foodies' (loving descriptions of gourmet delicacies throughout), people interested in the restaurant business, people who want to fall in love with colorful characters and snappy dialogue, anyone looking for something new to read, and yes, James Kennedy Toole fans. PS> I have yet to read the book's prequel 'The Value of X', but from what I gather it's not required reading for 'Liquor' (I certainly didn't feel like I was missing out on anything).

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2004

    The Passion of the Poppy

    Poppy Z. Brite¿s passion for the restaurant world shines brightly in LIQUOR, but you don't have to be a fan of food writing to appreciate her loving descriptions of gourmet meals and the careful preparation and presentation that goes into them. In fact, as I've observed on more than one occasion, Poppy¿s descriptions of food can even make meat sound appealing to a vegetarian. (I speak from personal experience.) Lest I give the wrong impression, I should point out that LIQUOR isn¿t just about food. It¿s about people--real people and real relationships. It¿s also about New Orleans, though not the New Orleans that¿s so frequently seen through the romanticized veil of Goth. Poppy's not afraid to show her hometown as it truly is, warts and all, but it's also obvious that she's fond of those warts, perhaps even moreso than the more conventionally beautiful parts of the city. If you've read THE VALUE OF X or any of Poppy¿s short stories about Rickey and G-man, reading LIQUOR will be like visiting with old friends. If not, it will be like making new ones. Either way, you¿ll be anxiously awaiting the follow-up novel, THE BIG D, which is scheduled for a Spring 2005 release.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2004

    Brite's Best in Years

    LIQUOR is one of the best novels ever written about the city of New Orleans. In the VALUE OF X, published by Subterranean Press last year and now out of print, Poppy Z introduced us to Gary and Rickey, two New Orleans teenagers who are beginning to find their two great passions in life, their love of food and their own changing relationship. In LIQUOR, Gary and Rickey have grown up... mostly. Gary is now G-Man, a nickname he earned working in the kitchens of New Orleans restaurants. They now live in uptown New Orleans and LIQUOR is the story of how they come to open their own restaurant. The characters are the most realistic portrayals of New Orleanians in a novel since CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES. The dialogue is spot on. And New Orleans is, simply, New Orleans... a city of eccentricities and a city in a full on love affair with food and liquor. Gone completely is the early sensual 'purple prose' that Brite was known for, replaced with a lean stripped down style of writing that exposes us to a new sensuality. Poppy no longer needs to romanticize the city of New Orleans through adjectives. She's found a better way. The exotic nature of New Orleans is layed out to us this time through the characters, through both their passions and their simplicities. And the food... oh, the food... There's probably no other city in this country who worships food more than we New Orleanians. And every note regarding this love affair in the book rings completely true. It's not just about the wonderful descriptions of dish after dish in the book that more than once had me salivating in hunger. It's also about the way the characters, from most minor to the most central, all lead lives in which food is a defining factor of their lives. Food and liquor. And that's New Orleans... food... liquor. I'm not going to reveal details about the novel, except that it's marvelous. It takes Poppy to a whole new level. You'll fall in love with Rickey and G-Man. If you don't already love New Orleans, you'll fall in love with it. You'll be ravenously hungry time and time again as you read the book. On a side note, the Kirkus review contains a couple of mistakes. Brite is most definitely a New Orleans native. And the villian of the book is most certainly and most obviously (if you've read the book) not a chef.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2014

    I absolutely loved this book. A great setting, plot and characte

    I absolutely loved this book. A great setting, plot and characters. I ordering PRIME now.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    Great!

    Loved it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2004

    What's the fuss...

    A friend of mine is a big fan of Poppy Brite's work. As I do not particularly care for the horror genre, I always declined the invitation to borrow my friend's books. So, when 'Liquor' came out and I saw it in the store (and that it wasn't horror), I thought I'd give it a try. I have only one question. What's the fuss? I found this book to be surprisingly dull with characters who are not particularly personable or well drawn. The 'plot' deals with Rickey and G-Man (the former being an annoying whiner) opening their own restaurant, one which has every dish prepared with Liquor. Unfortunately, Rickey's ex-boss decides to plot revenge. But the revenge he plots (and fails to enact) is c-grade at best. The dialog is perhaps the weakest in any novel I have ever read, with lines that are so stilted at times they sound as if someone from a family named Brady should be saying them. When the restaurant opens (finally) is the only time the novel works as it injects some energy into what, up until then, had been a plodding discovery of our lead characters' character (or lack thereof). All and all, I've had my taste of Poppy Brite. I doubt I'll be back for more. There are too many excellent novels out there to waste time on a penny dreadful.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2008

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    Posted February 26, 2011

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    Posted February 1, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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