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Little Brother

Average Rating 4
( 160 )
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(84)

4 Star

(39)

3 Star

(19)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(7)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Bound to become an instant classic.

To be honest, I picked this book up because it had a giant red X on the front. It reminded me of those signs that tell you not to do something, but you do it anyways. To be completely, bluntly, and brutally honest and simple, this was a damn good book. It's the kind of ...
To be honest, I picked this book up because it had a giant red X on the front. It reminded me of those signs that tell you not to do something, but you do it anyways. To be completely, bluntly, and brutally honest and simple, this was a damn good book. It's the kind of book that I could really see on a required reading list in a high school English class. It's a truly important book that deserves to be on shelves among To Kill a Mockingbird, Lord of the Flies, and The Catcher in the Rye...okay, maybe not right now, but in maybe ten years. It's an important book that any teenager can learn something from, whether it's how to hack a free Xbox or score a new girlfriend/boyfriend by smashing your homemade computer. Little Brother is a book about freedom--freedoms of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Read it. Buy it. Love it.

posted by TheAuthorChick on June 13, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Anonymos

Way too much technology that i dont undersand at all.

posted by Anonymous on February 26, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2012

    Anonymos

    Way too much technology that i dont undersand at all.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2010

    Little Brother Review

    For my Media Literacy class I had a chance to read the book Little Brother by: Cory Doctorow. Marcus, the main character in this book; is a computer whiz and loves playing video games with his friends Van, Darryl, and Julo. One day while they were searching San Francisco for a clue to there video game there is a terrorist attack on the Bay Bridge. Marcus and friends are at the wrong place at the wrong time and are picked up by the DHS and accused to be terrorists. They are taken to prison holding cells and beaten if they don't cooperate. Eventually he is released but can't tell his story or they will put him back in jail. He uses his computer skills to start a secret group to spread his story and tell people about how the government is controlling our lives. I can kind of relate to that because of how our school limits what websites we can visit, and doesn't allow us to text in school. In the end of the story Marcus is interviewed and tells his story which causes him to be put back in jail. After the second time he gets out he and his Friends decided they had enough and get lawyers and plan on getting revenge for what they went through. Overall I thought this was a pretty good book. Sometimes the author would get on rants about computer hacking or technology for a couple pages and then gets back to the story, but otherwise it was a good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2010

    Little Brother

    As Americans, we'll never forget September 11th. As a result, things have never been the same when it comes to terrorism. In the novel, Little Brother by Cory Doctrow, the main character Marcus witnesses a second attack against America just as devastating as September 11th. Not only that, he has also hacked into any program that he could. So it's not surprising when he is picked up and questioned by Homeland Security.

    Marcus is also known as w1n5t0n to his friends and anyone else on the web. Marcus is smart and feels he can hack into any computer security system's mainframe that the wants. Because all of his hacking and being in the wrong place at the wrong time, he and his friends are brought in for questioning even though they are only 17 years old. They have no rights and are treated as terrorists. Even though Marcus is innocent, he still does not help the government by giving up some of his programs. After he is released, his world is been taken over by the military and everyone is suspected of terrorism. Marcus feels this isn't the way you are supposed to live so he tries to get rid of Homeland Security using his knowledge of computers. What follows is his passion and determination to make his way of life the way it was before.

    I thought this book would be more on terrorism, but it was more about hacking into computers. If you are a techno-geek, you will like this book and the way it is written. It is an easy read for young adults. Marcus could be any student out there.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2010

    Little Brother Review

    I had recently made the choice read the book Little Brother by Cory Doctorow for a class assignment. It's a story involving a 17 year old tech-wiz named Marcus and three of his friends Darryl, Vanessa, and Jolu. The four of them go through many situations with one another when all they are trying to do is make it through their senior year. They go to a high school in San Francisco and end up going through several tragic events they won't forget.
    We learn in the beginning of the book that Marcuse and his friends are in high school and in their school they are watched very carefully with the new levels of technology that the school has. With the ability to track kids using books it causes frustration among the students. Marcuse and his friend enjoy playing a game known as Harajuku fun madness in order to win a trip. It's during their adventure that they run in to some serious problems. One day while they are out there was an unexpected explosion that ends up being a terrorist attack. As you might guess Marcus and his friends are in the wrong place at the wrong time and one of them gets hurt. When looking for help they flag down what seems to be the police, but ends up the Department of Homeland Security. The DHS takes them to their main headquarters to question them asking all about Marcuse and his high intelligence level thinking that they are involved in the attack. After several days they are released but once released Marcuse makes a vow to himself on how to deal with everything he went through. After this event Marcuse goes through many events dealing with his family, the DHS, and his love life as this high school students main focus is not get expelled or arrested. After reading this book the themes that came to mind were technologies influence on society and governments power level. Both of these themes seem to fit the book since the government treats citizens in an irrespective manner and the addition to new technology to get involved in others lives.
    I thought that this was an overall good book. I was really interested in the beginning but lost interest as it progressed. It seemed to talk about one thing for several pages and got reparative at some parts. It seemed to end quickly and other than some big events I thought was predictable.

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  • Posted May 7, 2010

    Little Brother Review

    I was in the 4th grade when the Twin Towers were attacked in New York City. The other students and I were sitting in Ms. Zimmerman's classroom when another teacher came in and told us the news. Marcus Yallow experienced this tragedy a little differently than I did. In the novel, Little Brother written by Cory Doctorow, he and his friends were playing an alternate reality game when they saw the Bay Bridge in San Francisco turn to rubble. Marcus and his tech-savvy friends fight a war against the government during their own country's devastating times.

    Marcus was with his friends Jolu, Van and Darryl when the attack occurred. Friendship is an important theme throughout this book. These four high school kids are the best of friends until the Department of Homeland Security breaks them apart. After they witness the attack, they flag down a truck to help them but this truck takes them all into custody. The four are interrogated and treated like criminals for six days in a prison. Once they are released and have given up not only passwords for their electronics, but their dignity as well, they swear to secrecy on what happened.

    "We can't tell them anything," Marcus says about telling their parents of the prison. Trust is another main theme. Marcus and his friends couldn't trust anyone with the news of what had happened to them. The San Francisco Police Department didn't trust anyone and considered "suspicious" people to be terrorists. Once Marcus decided to do something about their lack of freedom, he needed a trustworthy group of people to help him along the way. "Don't trust anyone over twenty-five" was a slogan used by a band who was looking to get the youth their freedom back, and also became a popular saying on the secret internet, Xnet.

    Marcus is not only the main character of this book, but he's also the narrator. If you like the super smart technology descriptions of how to hack computers or about cryptography, this is the book for you. Marcus always finds a way to talk about his technology smarts. To me, it was all blah blah blah, but that's just my opinion.

    If you are a fan of science fiction novels, this would be a good choice for you. It has a lot of geeky-tech information that didn't appeal to me. The author goes off on tangents of describing things that don't really relate to the story and don't need to be explained. It's a decent book that anyone who likes science fiction might find interesting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2010

    book review

    Little brother
    By Cory Doctorow

    The book little brother is a sci-fi fiction book that is all about technology and futuristic things. It grabs your attention and makes you never want to put it down. It is very interesting because it is fiction, but it's a technology world witch if you think it could happen in the future at some point and comes across as if it's today.
    The author Cory Doctorow is an interesting author and clearly has a huge imagination to write a book like this. He takes the technology we have today and expands it to a whole new level as he puts it all in the hands of a teenage boy.
    The main character is a seventeen year old kid named Marcus. Marcus is a really smart teenager and can find his way thorough almost any problems he runs into. Marcus goes to Caesar Chavez high school in San Francisco and the school locks down on him tight. It doesn't give a year in time, but it has future feel in every aspect of the book. The school uses computers for everything and has cameras that watch for kids that are a few seconds late for class.
    Marcus and his best friend Darryl love to play a puzzle game called Hurruka madness. This game is an active strategy puzzle game where Marcus and his team travel throughout the city and use technology to solve clues to find the answer. They have a team of four and the other two go to a different school, so when the crew decides to go on a hunt they have to all communicate to meet up in the city. It is interesting to see how quick Marcus is and how good he is with his technology. During his escape from school he has to use his cell phone and computer back and forth to just get out of class. The book really makes you want to read as Marcus makes split second decisions to avoid trouble.
    In this futuristic world the schools have cameras the trace walking patterns and put a face with that walk so this is no easy task. Marcus is a true genius fools the school by simply changing up his walk in a light way to throw off the camera. During the teams average day out on an adventurous hunt they run into some trouble and are taken into interrogation by the united States government. From this point on in the book I found myself very interested and even thought it was actually a book, I found my heart beating faster when Marcus and his crew ran into trouble.
    This book is considered sci-fi, but it has everything in it from love to action. It takes action to a technology level along with the typical action level of any book or movie. The author Cory Doctorow really used great detail to describe the situations and it made my imagination go wild with epic pictures and situations. I found myself thinking about it and even though it is fiction the author uses realistic answers to the problems Marcus and his crew run into.
    This was a great book that I would recommend to anyone who is looking for a good exciting read. It really keeps you guessing and interested thought the whole book. I would rate this book three stars out of five and say it is more if a guy's book then girls. If you like technology and sci-fi then this is a great book for you. You will have to find out how it ends by reading it yourself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2010

    Little Brother Review

    For my Media Lit class I had to read the book Little Brother by Cory Doctorow. It is an interesting book that takes place in San Francisco and tells the story of a 17 year old boy name Marcus Yallow who is a senior at Cesar Chavez School, but he is no average senior. He is one of those whiz kids who know anything and everything about technology. Things seem good for Marcus and his friends who like to play a virtual reality game called Harajuku Fun Madness, but everything goes wrong for Marcus and his friends when they decide to skip school one day to go and play this game.
    While Marcus and his friends, Van, Jolu, and Darryl are out trying to find the next clue to their game a terrorist attack happens and they are picked up by the Department of Homeland Security. The teens are imprisoned and treated like criminals such as being beaten, handcuffed and not allowed to eat. Marcus got it the worse because he would not allow the DHS to go through his cell phone. All the teens where eventually let go except for Darryl who was never seen after being taken Marcus takes it upon himself to figure out a way to take down the DHS.
    I think this book is an easy read for adults and teens. Hackers and techies will love it for the frequent applications of technologies and glimpses at where they might be headed. This book relates to issues that could happen in real life and the flaws in our government. Little Brother, however, is not a book about a disaster; it's a book about how people respond, as people, to disaster and fear, and in particular how quickly paranoia descends.
    Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist and blogger -- the co-editor of Boing Boing He is the former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founded the UK Open Rights Group. Born in Toronto, Canada, he now lives in London. Doctorow peppers his narrative with frequent information dumps, explaining in rigid detail the mechanics of programming, encryption, and mathematical formulas (this isn't as horrifying as it sounds) involved in the plot. These sessions often grind the story to a halt, but they're necessary for Doctorow to maintain a relationship with reality.
    Little Brother was nominated for the 2008 Hugo, Nebula, Sunburst and Locus Awards. It won the Ontario Library White Pine Award, the Prometheus Award as well as the Indienet Award for bestselling young adult novel in America's top 1000 independent bookstores in 2008.

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  • Posted May 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Little Brother Review

    It takes place as a 17 year old hacker from San Francisco found himself caught in a nearby terrorist bombing of a bridge while he and his friends were close. While running to shelter, Marcus's (main character) best friend Darryl was stabbed in a massive crowd and when Marcus starts to flag down cars driving by for help, he and his friends were kidnapped by Homeland Security and was severly questioned. After being interrogated and held hostage Marcus was finally release to realize his whole town was now under police survallence. Before Marcus was realesed though, spies invaded his room and set up gatches to keep him tapped in and under survallence. They did this so they could monitor what he was hacking and make sure he wasn't doing anything illegal or finding out what was really going on in San Francisco. Of course with Marcus's amazing hacking skills he was able to find a loop hole in the system. In this intense story Marcus will take you through a spark of wires and a new world where the government is trying to take over and control the life of the people. Marcus must learn his rights as a U.S. citezin and what he can do to stop what is occuring. I give this book a three out of five overall and if you are into hacking and police brutality than Little Brother is for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2010

    Little Brother Review

    "'My name is Marcus Yallow. I was tortured by my country but I still love it here. I'm seventeen years old. I want to grow up in a free country. I want to live in a free country.'"(363) Freedom is something that not everyone can have. Here in the United States, we are fortunate enough to be able to choose what we want to do, when we want to do something, and how we want to do it.

    In the novel Little Brother by Corey Doctorow, the theme of government suspending rights and freedoms of civilians to ensure safety from crimes appears throughout story, but Doctorow believes that the government has been set up to allow personal freedoms and under no circumstance should these rights be violated with unreasonable punishment or restrictions.

    Marcus, the main character a 17-year-old student in San Francisco, comes across many situations where either his or someone in his community's rights is infringed upon with abuse from the Department of Homeland Security. Whether it's being tortured under suspicion of Marcus being a terrorist, or the community going through dramatic, unneeded steps to ensure safety, some how the main focus of the United State's main morals are completely disregarded.

    Throughout the book marcus puts his friends in horrible situations that some can not get themselves out of. Marcus is also a cyber-whiz; he knows almost everything about technology and i do not so it was interesting getting to know him. Marcus was defiantly my favorite character in the book Little Bother because he shows a lot of bravery.
    In my opinion the book started off very strong, but then towards the middle It wasn't as interesting. The author writes a lot about the technology that marcus uses and I thought it was nice that he described the technology for the people like me who would have no idea what it is. This book has a lot of action which for the most part held my attention throughout. The characters in this story are relatable because they are average day teens who go through the same drama as any average teen would.

    The beginning of the book was my favorite because right away, Marcus found him self in the wrong place at the wrong time. Being accused of being an accomplis in an attack by terrorists, Marcus, along with his friends, Van, Jolu, and Darryl are caught and detained by the Department of Homeland Security, DHS. The four friends were split up, tortured and interrogated all for something they didn't do. The suspense and constant action held my attention throughout the beginning chapters.
    'We want to be sure that you're what you seem to be. This is about your security Marcus. Say you're innocent. You might be, though why an innocent man would act like he's got so much to hide is beyond me. But say you are: you could have been on that bridge when it blew up. Your parents could have been your friends. Don't you want us to catch the people who attacked your home?'
    It's funny, but when she was talking about getting my 'privileges' it scared me into submission (55).
    As the interrogation becomes worse, its becomes more relevant to Marcus that the way he is being treated is not fair. This specific quote frustrated me because while reading it I felt anger because they had no right to treat him in a inhumane way.

    I really enjoyed reading this book because there is a message meant for everyone. By living in a country where freedom is a given, I learned that it is important to remember to not take it for granted.

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