Customer Reviews for

Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever's Search for the Truth about Everything

Average Rating 2.5
( 10 )
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  • Posted June 20, 2014

    A Personal Autobiography

    This is an autobiography centered around events of the author's childhood. These mystical events are never described, so the suspense of the story is unresolved. The author proclaims herself an atheist and seems to remain so, even after confronting her mystical experiences much later in life. Her memory seems unable to go beyond or deeper than her diary entries and that is unfortunate. The reader is left asking "What happened that ws so powerful, yet not memorable enough to recall." This is not quite as meaty a read as the author's previous works.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2014

    Do not recommend for anyone....

    We chose this book for book club, I got halfway through and can't go any further. I felt like I was reading the ramblings of a self absorbed woman stuck in her past. Would not recommend to anyone, the book club is currently finding a replacement.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2014

    Highly personal

    She's a progressive activist, an engaging and successful political writer--I like her books--and a lifelong atheist. When she was a teenager she kept a journal. She had a mystical experience. It continues to baffle her. So far, so good. But 256 pages?

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2014

    Very disappointing.  If you're curious, just get it from the lib

    Very disappointing.  If you're curious, just get it from the library.  This book presents a very unflattering look of\at the author's personality: pompous, very impressed with her intelligence.  I bought this because I was a huge fan of Nickel and Dimed, and because I was intrigued by this mystical experience that she was supposed to tell us about.  The big build up led to very little in the way of  describing what she experienced, and considering that this was the crux of the story, it was completely disappointing.  The book seemed to be an exercise in her telling us how smart she is, which I'm sure is true, but what this has to do with her belief or nonbelief system and the title of the book is undeveloped and unclear to say the least.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 1, 2014

    Smart? Yeah, And In Your Face...

    At age 13, or thereabouts, precocious Barbara Ehrenreich embarked on exploring the vexing philosophical conundrum: "What is the point of our brief existence? What are we doing here and to what end?" The result, after years of early field work and mature reflection, is "Living with a Wild God."

    Why the title? "The one place I never thought to look for answers was religion," Ehrenreich recalls. "That approach had been foreclosed at some point in the late nineteenth century when, according to my father, his grandmother Mamie McLaughlin renounced the Catholic faith."

    At home "We did not believe, and what this meant, when I started on the path of metaphysical questioning, was that there were no ready answers at hand," Ehrenreich recalls. Visions of hell didn't discomfit her, "but it wasn't easy being a child atheist...At school, I tried to blend in by mouthing the 'Lord's Prayer' along with everyone else..." But on Wednesday there was nothing to hide. Then the other kids were bussed off to religious training classes at various churches while the young outsider remained at her desk. And that wasn't the worst. There were times she was "taunted after school for being a 'communist'...once some boys picked up rocks and chased me home, but I outran them."

    These are the more charming parts of "Living with a Wild God." Elsewhere, she'll probably be in many a reader's face with her insistence on super intelligence (although, true, she's Ph.D smart)and dark judgmental observations. In short, too often not a very attractive person.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 26, 2014

    Not what I thought

    I am a woman of almost the same age as the author, and as a "seeker" of truth and what's really going on, the title of this book was a total misnomer. In my mind, she has no God as I understand God. At times, it was so wordy, that I had to reread the sentence or paragraph several times and still couldn't relate to the meaning. I found some of her references interesting, but not as a believer in God and creation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    A flash of light, warmth, transcendence, pleasure, light, vision

    A flash of light, warmth, transcendence, pleasure, light, vision, boyfriend, sensation, adolescence, new emotions. That is what Ehrenreich experienced. What does this mean? In 250+ pages, Ehrenreich tries to tell us. She says this was a mystical experience. My women's reading club came to a different conclusion. Barbara Ehrenreich was having her first orgasm, or maybe her first multiple orgasm. Maybe the title of this book should be Wild God: My First Orgasm.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2014

    A scary peek inside a girls head.

    Based on its title and description this is not a book I would normally choose to read. I read this book because it was chosen by a member of my book club. The first 1/3 of the book the author seemed intent on throwing a lot of words at me that I had to look up. In spite of the author being a pedant (look it up) I found myself becoming invested in the protagonist which compelled me to finish. The last 2/3 of the book was quite enjoyable. All in all it was OK.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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