Customer Reviews for

A Local Habitation (October Daye Series #2)

Average Rating 4.5
( 102 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2014

    Loved it!

    loved it!

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Second books in urban fantasy series can be tricky, IMHO. The fi

    Second books in urban fantasy series can be tricky, IMHO. The first book is about introducing the main character and setting some parameters for what they are capable of, with just enough world-building to satisfy the reader as to how different/similar the setting is to our real world. The urge with an open-ended series that may or may not continue depending on sales is, I think, to throw a ton of world-building into the second book, to prove to the reader that there is so much more to explore. And I think this urge is often to the detriment of telling a solid story, especially if the second book (or movie) ends in a cliffhanger.

    Thankfully, this is not the case with the second October Daye book. The characters and the central mystery come first, and every world-building revelation (about Faerie court politics, the way the boundaries of Counties and Knowes are set up, the way each Faerie race has a "job," etc) is in service to the story. Even when you're aware of a scene being a large info-dump (here I'm thinking specifically of the background on the Night Haunts), it is woven so well into the narrative, comes at such an appropriate place in the story, that you don't notice ... because it doesn't break the pace of the story at all.

    The central mystery: what exactly IS going on in the county of Tamed Lightning (located near Fremont, California and stuck between Shadowed Hills, aka San Francisco, the county ruled by Toby's liege Duke Sylvester, and Dreamer's Glass, ruled by the Duchess Riordan) and why do residents keep turning up dead, is a very tight little "locked room" mystery. Or locked building, if you will, since the action ranges over most of the "county" of Tamed Lightning via a building in the mortal world. McGuire gives us, and Toby, a roomful of likely suspects, each with a secret of their own that Toby and her sidekick Quentin must ferret out if they're going to solve the bigger mystery. As with any classic mystery story, the people Toby meets are not always as forthcoming as you would hope one would be in the midst of a murder spree. But that's what makes stories like this work: the reader knows XX character is hiding something from the detective ... but because these books are narrated in first person by Toby, we don't find out any quicker than she does what those little secrets are. Still, the astute reader can pick up on details that Toby isn't consciously noticing at the moment but that McGuire clearly wants us to notice. (At one point in the book, I wondered aloud why we hadn't seen a particular character for quite a while, and why Toby hadn't seemed to notice that character had gone missing ... and a couple of chapters later, Toby puts that piece together with other information to reach a conclusion I won't spoil here.)

    There is also a great deal of character development for Toby and especially for Quentin, the teenage squire (for lack of a better term) Sylvester sends with Toby on what at first blush is a mission to just check on Sylvester's niece and report back. There is a great bond developing between Toby and Quentin that I assume future books (there are 7 books in the series so far) will further enhance. McGuire really captures the "sullen but adoring teenager" character well in Quentin; the Toby-Quentin relationship, right now at least, reminds me of mine with my nephew Jared. Toby's voice, as the narrator, is of course the strongest in the book ... but Toby is perceptive, a reliable narrator, and I don't suspect that her interpretations of the behavior of the people she loves (Sylvester, Luna, Quentin, Connor, even the Luidaeg) are very off-base as some narrators can be.

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Worth a read

    Good start and end. The middle takes a bit since it seems the involved characters have lost most of their marbles for awhile. A bit of a slog reading about the folks dying for what appears to be no real reason. I look forward to #3 anyway.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    So good

    So good

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    Great book

    I really like this series.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2010

    good followup to Rosemary and Rue

    I liked the first book better (Rosemary and Rue)but still look forward to the next installment.

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