Customer Reviews for

Lon Po Po

Average Rating 4.5
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted April 18, 2009

    Classic Tale with a Twist

    It's Little Red Riding Hood meets Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon! My son did a class report on this Caldecot Winner and it had everything a little boy would love: brave children, suspense and a killer wolf. Great children's folk tale for kids who like a little adventure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2007

    Caldecott Winner!

    A wolf enters a Chinese household where three girls live and pretends to be their grandmother. When the wolf enters the house the girls began to question him about his furry feet. The girls think something is wrong and take matters into their own hands. What did the girls do- read to find out! The reading level is 4-8 and this book is a fantasy fiction. Young, Ed. Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China. NY: Philomel. 1989.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Cute story

    Long, Long ago, a good woman lived contentedly with her three daughters. Shag, Tao, and Paotze in the country side of northern China. But one day she had to leave to visit their granny, so she warned her children, ¿to close the door tight and to latch it.¿ Soon after, here was a knock at the door and a voice saying, ¿this is your granny.¿ The children let her in and found that it was someone with a hairy face. They trick the wolf and end up killing the wolf, then their mother returns safely.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Lon Po Po puts a new twist on the old classic, Red Riding Hood.

    The story begins with three sisters who are being left alone at home while their mother goes to visit their grandmother. Prior to leaving, the mother tells the girls to keep all of the doors locked and not to allow anyone in while she is gone. The three daughters do as they are told. Unfortunately, a clever wolf overheard about the mother¿s trip. The wolf dresses up like an old woman and knocks at the door. When the girls ask who is there, the wolf replies that it was 'Po Po'(The girls grandmother) who has come to visit them. Foolishly, they let him in. The girls ask questions regarding the grandmother's odd new features. It wasn¿t until Shang, the eldest, caught a glimpse of the wolf's large, brown snout that she recognized the true seriousness and danger of their situation. The girls devise a plan to get rid of the sly wolf once and for all. Although I found this story fascinating, it¿s dark illustrations and violent plot line, may be too frightening for younger readers. I would recommend this book for students in the third grade or higher.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2006

    Lon Po PO

    Lon Po Po is a Caldecott Award book. This book is a Red-Riding Hood story from China. Long ago a woman lived with her three daughters. She left to goo and visit their grandmother. She told them, ¿Remember to close the door tight at sunset and latch it well!¿. The daughters done as is a Caldecott Award book. This book is a Red-Riding Hood story from China. Long ago a woman lived with her three daughters. She left to goo and visit their grandmother. She told them, ¿Remember to close the door tight at sunset and latch it well!¿. The daughters done as their mother had told them. At sunset a knock came at the door. The voice on the other side said it was their PoPo (grandmother). Will the girls let the person inside? This book would be good for grades 3-7. I enjoyed this book. I didn¿t realize that other countries told the same stories as our country does. This is a traditional story. The author Ed Young was born in Tientsin, China. He grew up in Shanghai. Mr. Young lives in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, with his wife, Filomena. He has also written Yeh Shen, A cinderalla story from china. Young, Ed. Lon Po Po. New York: Philomel Books, 1989.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2006

    A small twist to an old tale.

    Lon Po Po, A Red-Riding Hood Story From China is a interesting variation the the original. The story takes place in China, with 3 sisters. The mother has left them home while she travel to her grandmothers house. Watching from the forest, the wolf watches the mother until she is out of sight. The wolf then disguises himself as the grandmother. This is a traditional tale that has been told for years, so readers can guess what happens next. The only difference between the stories, is that in this version, written by Ed Young, the young children lure the wolf to a ginko tree, were he is easily decieved. Ed Young was born in Tientsin, China, and grew up in Shanghai. He has illustrated over 80 books, and written 15. He studies at the University of Illinois, the Art Center of Los Angeles, and the Pratt Institute of New York. Currently he lives in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, with his wife. He won the 1990 Caldecott for his version of Little Red Riding Hood. I really enjoyed reading a different version of an old tradition tale with a different twist. The twist in the story begins the eldest child saying, ' Po Po, Po Po, you must be hungry, Have you eaten gingko nuts?' The other then explains what gingko is. His illustrations are focused in on the main themes of the book which are the children and the wolf and how some things aren't always what they seem. I also the use of the watercolors and pastels. Grade Level: 3rd Young, Ed. Lon Po Po: A Red Riding Hood Story From China. New York: Philomel Books, 1989.

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