Customer Reviews for

Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Perfect Insight

I am a school teacher and have been around autism all of my life. My uncle has autism. 'Look Me In The Eye' gives you insight of the life of a boy and a man living with autism. John Elder Robison seems at the upper (higher functioning) end of the autism spectrum. M...
I am a school teacher and have been around autism all of my life. My uncle has autism. 'Look Me In The Eye' gives you insight of the life of a boy and a man living with autism. John Elder Robison seems at the upper (higher functioning) end of the autism spectrum. Mr. Robison's way of telling his life story is phenomenal. I had trouble putting the book down. The insight that he gives about someone with autism is great. If you know anyone with autism or are in a profession that may have to deal with autism, this is definitely a book to read.

posted by JennyD525 on April 7, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

A Book That Makes You Smile and Cry

People with Aspergers see the world differently than you and me. I read a memoir, called Look Me in the Eye by John Elder Robinson. It is a great book, I would recommend to adult readers. The story is about a boy named John Elder Robison who lives his life not knowing h...
People with Aspergers see the world differently than you and me. I read a memoir, called Look Me in the Eye by John Elder Robinson. It is a great book, I would recommend to adult readers. The story is about a boy named John Elder Robison who lives his life not knowing he has Aspergers. John Elder struggles to socialize correctly and doesn't know why he can't make friends. As Entertainment Weekly newspaper says, "Growing up was a mystifying experience for John Elder Robison, a bright kid unable to grasp even the most basic social skills - a condition he later learned was a form of autism called Aspergers." Aspergers is a form of autism mostly affecting the person's social skills. I really liked the part where John is a little boy and decides to name his little brother "Varmint. I really did like this book but I would not recommend it to young readers. I don't think that this would be a good book for young readers because it is slow and not very action packed and some of the content, it could get boring for some readers.

posted by BaileyT7E on April 8, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2010

    Loved it!

    I had only heard of Asperger's and this book was my opportunity to learn more. I was drawn inside the mind of someone who has a very different way of thinking and looking at things. The narrator's train of thoughts, though hilarious at times, is always very logical. Some of his personal struggles are easy to relate to if you have ever been misunderstood by people around you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    This book was an excellent story about the author's life struggl

    This book was an excellent story about the author's life struggles with Asperger's. It opened my eyes to how people with autism are treated so differently in society and are automatically labeled as "not normal". It portrayed a message that everyone should be treated equal and just because our minds cannot process things the same does not mean they should be labeled as any less than every other human being. I liked this book because it was written from the perspective of someone who has actually experienced the hardships of Asperger's instead of an outsider’s opinion on what autism is. It was more relatable and I felt more empathy for the main character because he described the events of his own life from his perspective. The writing style made it an easy read and I couldn’t put the book down. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone, especially people with a biased opinion about someone with Asperger’s because it changed my mind about how I view not only people with disabilities but other people in society as well.

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  • Posted February 20, 2013

    Look me in the Eye written by John Elder Robinson tracks the li

    Look me in the Eye written by John Elder Robinson tracks the life of a man suffering from a form of autism, Asperger’s syndrome. The unique aspect of this case is Robinson knew he was different from everyone else, but he did not know why or how. Robinson’s differences included random blurbs, dissembling household items, and digging five foot holes for his brother to go in. He lived his life in an unstable household where he soon escaped from and dropped out of school which would be the best thing he would do with his life. Going on to be a successful man in the music technology industry, working with Kiss and Pink Floyd and then running and operating his own car restoration business. He uncovered he had Asperger’s syndrome when we was thirty-nine years old
    This story is deeply moving because of the hardship Robinson faced as a young child, but is filled with comic relief as he tells his story with a sense of humor and childhood anecdotes of his brother and himself. The fact that Robinson did not know he had a mental disability is the most astonishing because he had no way of understanding why he had troubles communicating with people. He stuck out life a sore thumb, but he overcame it. The lesson he taught was if motivation and passion exist in life, anything is possible. Robinson was forced to jump major hurdles to be happy and successful. Because Asperger’s was not a diagnosis is this time period, he had no excuses for himself and he pushed through.
    The novel is passionate, yet funny, which is not an easy combination, so the book is always entertaining. There is never a dull moment and it’s hard not to like. Also, you learn a lot about what it is like growing up with a mental disability, increasing the interest level. The story makes you reflect on your own life because this man with Asperger’s syndrome is so successful and overpowering major obstacles in his life that would easily discourage anyone. You take a step back and become grateful for the brain power you have and stop taking life for granted.
    Look me in the Eye is a must read because of the courage and motivation it teaches through a child growing up not knowing why he cannot make friends. The anecdotes create a more personal connection level and allow the reader to judge their life for what it is worth and everything they have. The reader learns anything is possible, no matter the circumstances, if passion and motivation is involved.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    Good read to help anyone understand Asperger's

    I particularly like this book because it is written by someone who actually has Asperger's and I can see from inside the real mind of someone how the brain is working, processing in ways that are different from the "norm".

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  • Posted February 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Look in the Mirror

    Been lonely all your life? Failed in your career because you are not a "team player"? People tell you that you are aloof, interested in "wierd" things," etc.? READ THIS BOOK!
    The middle of the book sags, but the revelations are worth it. Whether you or a family member or friend have been diagnosed or not, you will understand why you can't "look [them] in the eye", and be inspired to know that you are not alone.
    Aspergian non-team players may want to consider telling your employer that you are "en[dis]abled" with Asperger's, and ask if "team playing" is an essential function of your job.

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  • Posted July 28, 2009

    You Need Your Eyes Wide Open For This One

    This book will not be a delight for everyone, but it should be required reading for all. It truly opens one's eyes to our faults in relating to people with disabilities, and what is truly an important lesson we all should experience--how to really accept each other. To get everything you can from this book you need to keep your eyes wide open and be willing to take in the crazy along with the amazing. It gives you wonderful insight to the thoughts and feelings of those who deal with a disability. The first few chapters are so strange I thought I might not like it, but as I kept reading about his incredible life I became more and more hooked by his circumstances. Before I knew it I' finished the book and felt as if I'd just learned a completely new skill and proud that I had. It was worth every minute.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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