Customer Reviews for

Lord of the Silver Bow (Troy Series #1)

Average Rating 4.5
( 43 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 44 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2005

    Excellent book!

    I have thoroughly enjoyed reading every book Gemmell has ever written. I think I¿ve read almost 30 in the past year or so. Troy was no exception. Everything you¿d expect from this author¿ the original story, the realistic characters that you develop feelings for, interesting and amusing situations that piece together as the story progresses, descriptive battle scenes, and even a map in the front of the book. I always love the map reference. It makes the story more realistic, rather than an author who seems to just make up vague places as they go along. The only thing I don¿t like is having to wait for his next book to be published. Great job!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    terrific historical fiction

    Dardania Prince Helikaon sails the stormy Great Green Sea on a gigantic ship that most feel will quickly sink due to its massive size. He and companion Zidantas have angered King Agamemnon of Mykene when they killed the pirates terrorizing the Great Green Sea Agamemnon stealthy abetted the pirates. --- At about the same time, Priam of Troy has killed his sons except for Hektor the warrior who allied with the Hittites against the Egyptians. Priam orders Priestess Andromache to wed Hektor. Instead she sails for Blue Owl Bay where she meets Helikaon. He falls in love with her while several people try to kill him one enemy Kolanos tortures and murders Zidantas. Outraged and out of control, Helikaon begins destroying Mykene ships with the crew on board. As Kolanos flees, Helikaon follows devastating anything in his path with Troy the apparent destination of the blood feud that has boiled over. --- TROY LORD OF THE SILVER BOW is a terrific historical fiction that brings alive the Trojan War era as few tales do. The story line is fast-paced and action-packed, but works because the key cast members seem genuine. Helikaon runs a gamut of emotions from stoic warrior-trader sailor to besotted hero to avenging berserker. Priam also comes across as real as he is the tyrannical Machiavellian poster monarch. Others like Kolanos, Andromache and Zidantas add to the overall feel that this exciting thriller is the real deal. --- Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2006

    A very true book

    When I first I read this book I thought that I was not into this kinda stuff but, when I read it, I sank deep into the book. All of the characters are a book of their own. This book is the best I've read so far of all the book I've read. This is my first of David's works so far but I will continue to read them!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    "Danger is the seed from which courage grows." Odysseu

    "Danger is the seed from which courage grows."
    Odysseus in David Gemmell's "Lord of the Silver Bow"








    I had tried reading David Gemmell's "Lord of the Silver Bow" about 9 months ago. It was heavy, plodding, and confusing. I was looking for a fun story full of action and adventure, and I love history...but, alas, I stopped reading after about 50 pages, and kind of figured that I was simply beyond the age when testosterone-fueled adventures could carry a story. I gave it a second shot, and it turns out, I was wrong. This first in Gemmell's trilogy that retells the story of the Trojan War is enjoyable, fun, and surprisingly deep.




    Gemmell's language and themes are audacious and often mythic. The story and themes are soaked in an age of heroism when Gods were considered real, and honor and courage were as coveted as bronze. The dialogue drives big and bold themes; addressed by bigger and bolder men (mostly); and acted upon in the most courageous (and sometimes cowardly) ways. This isn't a fantasy novel. This is historical fiction...taking nuggets from the well-trodden story of Troy, and molding them into a new shining historical epic. 








    "No force under the stars is more powerful than hatred." 








    War's a' brewin' on the wine-dark-sea, and Aeneas, known by his nickname Helikaon, isn't helping the situation through his enflamed vendetta against the Mykene general Kolanos. Aeneas is at the center of "Silver Bow", and he has anger issues. He would go on, as legend would tell, to establish one the greatest of ancient empires: Rome. He's one of the most respected men across the Aegaen despite the fact that he's beloved in the East and hated in the West.




    Battlefield philosophy rings loudly throughout the book. Helikaon states, "A great man once told me there can be no courage without fear. He was right. Remember that when you're belly trembles and your legs grow weak." And later, Odysseus says, "A man who rushes into battle fearlessly is not a hero. He is merely a strong man with a big sword. An act of courage requires the overcoming of rear."




    One of the most predominant and heavy themes is the consideration of what makes a person good or bad; moral or evil. Not unlike the gods of Greek mythology, the characters in "Lord" all have aspects of weakness. While the deeds and emotions are enormous, very few characters are pure evil or purely heroic. Their decisions and actions are just 'right' enough, or just 'wrong' enough to balance the scales towards one end or the other. An Egyptian joins Helikaon's crew and brings his own brand of philosophical views into the equation. He states that good and evil are in everyone and at constant war. "All of us are capable of great compassion and love or hatred and horror. Sadly, we can take joy from both."




    In another theme, Gemmell's characters explore loss and the context of what it means, and it's lasting impact. The emotions felt by the characters are deep and acute. And in the context of this story, with all of its mythological proportions, the sometimes melodramatic emotions fit. Who wouldn't feel the internal slice of a lost love; or the death of someone close? The pain doesn't slip away quickly or easily.




    "Lord of the Silver Bow" is a terrific book. Your expectations must revolve around the fact that this is a fictional retelling of the enormous, and enormously dramatic, historical-fantasy of The Illiad. In that context, the book hits on almost all cylinders. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

    Fantastic!

    Loved it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2012

    Hi

    Wont let me read example book....

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2011

    Sounds Fantastic

    This book sounds fantastic and I was really looking forward to reading it. The problem is that I downloaded the sample to my nook but it will not open. I am afraid to purchase the entire book to find out that it won't open either. Has anyone had this problem with sample but full book was fine. I really want to read it on my nook.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2006

    Exciting Take on Greek Myth

    I loved this tale of Aeneas, Odysseus, and the events leading up to the Greek invasion of Troy. Characters we're familiar with from ancient sources come to vivid life. In David Gemmell's version of things, Odysseus was a seafarer king who was also a master storyteller in every port - thus his spinning extraordinary tales of out of the ordinary adventures of his crew. And Helen of Troy was a perfectly nice but (gasp!) rather plain young woman. Filled with action, humor, tenderness, and the sunlit Aegean sea, this is a story that's hard to put down. I can't wait for the next installment in the Troy series.

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    Posted October 7, 2011

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    Posted October 1, 2009

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    Posted May 23, 2010

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    Posted October 28, 2008

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    Posted January 2, 2011

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    Posted February 17, 2011

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    Posted January 18, 2012

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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    Posted October 15, 2010

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    Posted January 29, 2011

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    Posted June 24, 2011

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    Posted February 13, 2012

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