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Losing Our Religion: The Liberal Media's Attack on Christianity

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  • Posted August 17, 2012

    If S.E. Cupp were a religious woman, lefties would, to the infin

    If S.E. Cupp were a religious woman, lefties would, to the
    infinitessimal degree to which they are capable of the faculty of
    thought, think, "Oh, yet another Religious Right extremist
    bellyaching about the left-wing media's assault on our Judeo-Christian
    values." As it turns out, Miss Cupp is a self-avowed atheist who
    has more respect for our nation's values than most Jews and Christians.
    Unlike many other atheists, she elucidates the virtues of Christianity,
    rather than denouncing Christianity, a la Dawkins, Maher and company.
    Thank you, S.E., for your honesty, and may you someday become a
    Christian, especially either Catholic or Eastern Orthodox! Regards,
    Reds
    Whittier, CA

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 25, 2011

    Must read

    Great breakdown of how media is tolerant of everybody but those who believe in something like a singular God... and written by athiest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A thought-provoking look at one aspect of media bias

    S. E. Cupp is a young conservative commentator who is also an atheist. As such, you might expect her to be impatient of people who are strongly religious, but instead, she respects religious folks and especially faith-filled Christians, despite not sharing their beliefs.

    S. E. believes that Christians in the U.S. are being targetted by a cynical and disrespectful media, and that, to borrow her image, they won't be happy until the practice of Christian religion is like smoking -- something you're allowed to do in your own home but that must be kept out of the public square.

    Clearly, with the First Amendment guaranteeing the people's right to "freely exercise their religion", keeping religious folks from expressing their beliefs in the public square was never intended by the Founding Fathers, but S.E. presents strong evidence that many in the "elite media" would like to see it happen.

    The book is written with S.E.'s trademark flare and style, and anyone familiar with her news columns and her interviews on Fox News will recognize her personal touch. The writing is accessible without being pedestrian, and the research is surprisingly thorough. She digs up some very enlightening contrasts in how the media treats obviously fake professions of faith by liberals, vs. sincere ones by conservatives.

    If S. E. were a practicing Christian herself this book would be far less compelling. But the fact that she is an atheist and still sees so much bias against religious folks really drives the point home. And the bottom line, of course, is that she is not making the stuff up. There are well over 200 footnoted references.

    The only criticism I have of this book is that I wish it were longer. I love S.E.'s writing style and can't wait for her next book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 28, 2012

    Glib, and fails to answer its title question

    The subtitle of this book is "Why the Liberal Media Want to Tell You What to Think, Where to Pray, and How to Live": the book never answers this question. Ms. Cupp offers many examples (there are even a few footnotes, although there should be more, as well as perhaps even a bibliography), and this sets her apart from those who merely pontificate without even the appearance of factual support, but this also leads to the liability that the book is a laundry list of episodes--and an often too facetiously presented one at that--rather than what this book should, based on its very name, be: an argument of why and how the antipathy to religion exists. She posits intellectual elitism, for instance: "Way back in 1784, Immanuel Kant, in response to the Reverend Johann Friedrich Zollner's question 'What is Englightenment?' wrote 'Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-incurred immaturity.' This was Kant's condescending way of saying 'reason is for smart people and religion is for idiots.' Of course Kant's views were shared by such luminaries as Karl Marx and the Marquis de Sade." Has she even read that essay by Kant? Are his views in it really akin to those of the other two she mentions? Kant's response to Zollner is not a slam against the intellect of the religious, and he even goes on in some detail about a distinction he makes between offices where one must be obedient and follow dogma and offices where one must be scholarly and freely employ reason. Above all, Kant's point about reason seems to be that disagreement should take place in the right circumstances and in a reasonable way between reasonable men. If anything, in our time it is the anti-religious (the targets of Ms. Cupp's book) who eschew any rational discourse and merely attempt to stifle their opposition. Likening any of that to Kant seems a bit strange. She also quotes Dinesh D'Souza as saying that the destructive tendency of the press today "isn't how it was one hundred years ago." Really? Has he not heard of yellow journalism? "Do you know any reporters who are happily married, churchgoing, normal guys with a wife and three kids at home?" D'Souza asks and then answers, "Probably not." Huh? Is it a seriously offered contention that among the causes of the anti-religious problem in the news is that journalists today are just miserable people who lack the fine principles of their forebears? One critical observation Ms. Cupp makes, however, is this: "atheism isn't a creed or a value system, it's the absence of one." It underscores the very matter that she fails to explore: there is a long-standing value system, a way of morally apprehending the world, and its principal detractors lack a readily definable moral structure. So why does the liberal media want to tell you ... I don't think S.E. Cupp knows. I didn't really expect a colossal amount of depth from this work. Ms. Cupp is a young up-and-coming personality, a minor celebrity of sorts, and I suppose it's nice for her that works like this get her a bit of exposure, and a few nice congratulations from the more established maintstream conservative commentators. It's not really a particularly good book, though.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2010

    didn't read this book but....

    I saw S.E. Cupp on real time with bill maher and she said "I don't believe in God, but I'm not mad at him" (who is this him that she doesn't believe in?). This does not sound like an atheist. This sounds like a young woman who just got her Masters in religious studies, and in order to sell a book, she is pretending to be an atheist, cause it makes her seem impartial, instead of just being just another conservative christian writing a religious propaganda piece.

    Forward is by Huckabee and probably has a pop out with a song playing when you turn the page, just in case you needed any other reasons not to buy it.

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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