Customer Reviews for

The Lost Angel

Average Rating 4
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 7 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted October 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Hard to put down once you start

    This book grabbed me from the very beginning. The characters are varied, multi-leveled and interesting. Noah's ark.is it real, does it still exists somewhere in the mountains of Turkey, and if so what does that mean to mankind? Those are a few questions I found myself asking while reading this book. Angels and humans mixing blood and knowledge? I've read a few books lately on angels and many say the same thing about a race of fallen angels, who came to earth and lived as humans, but they passed their divine DNA to the Earth's population and those half-angels are trying to find a way get home.

    This is an interesting tale that kept me reading and reading. Even a Mormon mention when the seer stones were discussed. The Urim and Thummim, was what Joseph Smith used to translate the golden plates the angel Moroni gave him, two stones connected to a breastplate. The story tells us that the stones were Seer stones that came from the Ark, and that many exist on the Earth, but most are lost currently.

    I enjoyed this book and would suggest it to anyone who likes a good mystery mixed with a few well placed facts. Religion, secular knowledge, emotional manipulation, historical facts and fiction, fill these pages making this a book you won't want to put down. If you enjoy Dan Brown you will enjoy this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    Great book, good read. Very well woven.

    Great book, good read. Very well woven.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    Simply love it, great read!

    Love it!

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  • Posted September 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    an exciting religious thriller

    At the National Security Agency, field operative Nick Allen watches a tape of his friend scientist Martin Faber being kidnapped by Kurds. Faber was conducting research into climate change near Mount Ararat when he was abducted. To insure Faber's wife Julia Alvarez a psychic is safe and for her to help his rescue attempt, Allen searches and finds her in Galicia, Spain studying the sculptures at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela; just before an assassin almost got her.

    However, as time runs out on Faber, Allen and Alvarez try to save him using the clues he left in the video for his wife to interpret. The group that holds Faber believes they are descendants of angels and the time is now for their return to Heaven with their abductee as the enabler. Faber, who was also looking for the biblical arc, believes that that Elizabethan astrologer John Dee spoke to angels. There is less than seventy-two hours to before this fanatic group ends the world. All these descendants of exiles will converge on Mount Ararat where a stone of power will either save the world or send everyone to their maker.

    The Lost Angel is an exciting religious thriller that grips the audience from the moment Faber is snatched and never slows down until the final confrontation. Although there are a few unlikely revelations that detract from the story line, for the most part Javier Sierra ties universal beliefs shared by most religions into a terrific twisting end of days' thriller.

    Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 7 Customer Reviews
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