Customer Reviews for

The Lost Art of Gratitude (Isabel Dalhousie Series #6)

Average Rating 4
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted January 9, 2010

    Another charming addition to the series!

    Isabel and Jamie are such "regular folks." I feel like they are my neighbors, or people I'd be likely to interact with. This series of books is delightful.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Another great installment in the Isabel Dalhousie series

    Once again Alexander McCall Smith has won my heart and mind with his portrayal of Isabel Dalhousie, a forty-something philospher and mother of Charlie, her son with Jamie, whom she still sometimes fears she may have stolen from her foolish and fickle niece who didn't find in him what Isabel found -- perfection. What a delightful fairy tale these novels tell! What middle-aged woman wouldn't want to be loved by a perfect young man and have a beautiful young son whose first word is "olive"?

    McCall Smith unfailingly captures the essence of women's thought processes and makes me, his faithful reader, feel as if I am not alone in my own idiosyncracies. The novel, like the others in the series, is "talky," but with good reason. As a philosopher Isabel must think about everything and must decide if she is being morally correct in each of her decisions. I find that her deliberations are so like my own that with each new novel, I am reassured a bit more that I am not crazy for thinking things through much as she does. Isabel is totally sane; therefore, I must be sane as well. It is very reassuring to find a soulmate in this woman I respect and admire, a woman who leads a rather normal, quiet, domestic life, but who must consider choices that come her way.

    Isabel is unfailingly intelligent and perceptive and, in short, my idol. She is refreshing and delightful. Her stories never fail to move me to some deeper understanding of myself as a modern woman facing ordinary choices that require more depth of thought than just what to have for dinner.

    Thank you again, Alexander McCall Smith, for your wonderful Isabel, who like Precious Ramotswe, is a woman who makes the rest of us women glad to be what we are and to have a kind man who appreciates our odd little ways. I hope your own wife enjoys your books as much as I do.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 13, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    You probably know all about McCall-Smith by now

    Alexander McCall Smith is awfully special. I am continually amazed that there is so much of life in his calm stories, that there is so much for us to ruminate about and apply to our own lives. In this series, and in The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency, McCall Smith channels older women. Perhaps they are unreal, as some readers have pointed out--I certainly can make a claim that his male characters don't seem quite fleshed out in the American sense. That is, I have never met men like Jaime, say, or some of the others. But when I sit down with them I feel as though I am meeting friends over a cuppa, and we can natter on about nearly anything. I find it very warming and generous and kind.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I Like Gratitude

    I liked this book because I like reading about Scotland. I also like the relationship between Isabel and Jamie. Minty was a evil character but I wanted to see what happened to her. I recommend this book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 22, 2012

    another delightful Isabel Dalhousie adventure

    I am a big fan of this series. The way that Isabel's thoughts take her places totally unrelated to the subject at hand sometimes make me laugh out loud. For example, her imagining Cat's (now ex) boyfriend traveling the high wire in his elevator shoes was a great mental image. I also like her inner arguments with herself: when she is judgmental, she quickly reminds herself that she may be being unfair. The quirks, the snatches of poetry, the love for Jamie and Charlie, it all adds up to a wonderful and gently thought provoking read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 23, 2010

    McCall-Smith does it again!

    This is a lovely read for anyone who has enjoyed the first 5 books in the Isabel Dalhousie series. Couldn't wait to get my hands on it and I was not disappointed. However, I think it's about time that Isabel learns how to set her boundaries with Dove and Lettuce, because they continue to walk all over her because of her strange understanding of what forgiveness means.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 28, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Wonderful tale

    Feeling a bit paranoid investment banker Minty Auchterlonie fears someone detests her so much that they are trying to harm her. First government tax agents are investigating her though she has no idea why suddenly they are doing it unless someone tipped them off. Second she received a funeral wreath from an unknown sender.

    At a child's birthday party, Minty tells her friend Scottish philosopher Isabel Dalhouse, whose not quite two year old son Charlie is at the bash, that she believes someone is after her. Isabel investigates using skills honed by being the editor of the Review of Applied Ethics. She questions the most likely suspect Jock Dundas, who believes he sired Minty's son during an affair they had; he wants time with his alleged offspring or he will expose her to her spouse Gordon McCaig. Meanwhile her enemy accuses Isabel of failing to prevent plagiarism at the Review and her lover Jamie asks her to marry him so they and their son Charlie can be a family.

    If you seek a bit more action turn to the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency tales. However as with Precious's detecting, Isabel is a great focus who holds the intelligent slice of life plot together (see The Comforts of a Muddy Saturday). Character driven, readers will enjoy this sage saga as evil comes in many shapes, but never a Dove as Isabel learns first hand The Lost Art Of Gratitude as no one seems to appreciate her efforts.

    Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2010

    Wonderful

    His usual excellent writing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    The Lost Art of Gratitude

    McCall Smith keeps getting better!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2