Customer Reviews for

The Lost Gate (Mither Mages Series #1)

Average Rating 4
( 254 )
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(120)

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(31)

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(18)

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(13)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

Entertaining!

Danny North is a young man, growing up as an outsider in a powerful and mysterious magical family. His family isolates themselves in the mountains of western Virginia, practicing magic and teaching it to their children, but Danny is scorned for his lack of magical talen...
Danny North is a young man, growing up as an outsider in a powerful and mysterious magical family. His family isolates themselves in the mountains of western Virginia, practicing magic and teaching it to their children, but Danny is scorned for his lack of magical talents. As he get older he becomes more aware of the secrets and tensions wrapped up in his birth and the old legends of Loki. Loki long ago closed all the gates between Earth and the gods, trapping Danny's family on Earth. Soon, Danny must leave his family in order to discover his own power and challenge the ancient, evil gatekeeper.

This is the first book by Orson Scott Card that I have read, so I can't compare it to his others, but I will be reading more! The stories of Danny and Loki are expertly woven together, the characters are fascinating and widely varied, and there is a lot of fast-paced action with some thought provoking morality thrown in. I don't often dip my toes into the fantasy genre, but it made for a very nice change. I was thoroughly entertained by The Lost Gate and I look forward to reading the next book in this series.

I listened to the audio version of Lost Gate, narrated by Emily Janice Card and Stefan Rudnicki. Having different readers to distinguish between the two different story threads was very helpful for keeping everything straight. Emily Janice Card reads with a fresh, young voice that makes a startling and interesting contrast to Stefan Rudnicki's deep, resonant voice.

posted by Frisbeesage on July 11, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

don't even bother

This book was infuriating...it started out interesting (good enough for me to buy it based on the sample I read), then got VERY slow, then sped up at the end. Contains very uneven pacing and too much detail on things that didn't matter (such as Danny's high school exper...
This book was infuriating...it started out interesting (good enough for me to buy it based on the sample I read), then got VERY slow, then sped up at the end. Contains very uneven pacing and too much detail on things that didn't matter (such as Danny's high school experiences). Not worth the money I paid for it. When I read the author's notes on how he wrote whole chapters in a single day or while on a plane, it made sense. My 9 year old could do a better job.

posted by read_to_live on January 26, 2011

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  • Posted October 29, 2011

    A fun read!

    I thought that this was a fun and fairly interesting take on the typical hero story. Almost none of the key ideas were strictly original,but Card does a good job fleshing out the characters, weaving an engaging plot, and building a mythology. Well worth the money as far as entertainment value goes, and I am looking forward to a sequel.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

    I became interested in reading more Card after reading Ender's G

    I became interested in reading more Card after reading Ender's Game so I tried this one. The beginning of the book is too disconnected for my taste - I almost thought I was reading two different stories. There is also what I believe to be a low part in the story involving the library bathroom (where were the editors?) and I was really tempted to stop reading the rest of the book. Having said all that I'm glad I stuck with it as story lines got better and came together nicely at the end.

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  • Posted September 6, 2013

    Interesting concept

    Loved the idea of the worlds Gods being stuck here and losing their powers and as with all Card's books it is a well written and told story. I just felt apathy for most of the characters. I am hoping the next book will not only continue with the great concept but will capture my interest with more character developement.

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  • Posted April 14, 2013

    Good read, but expect the usual flaws

    I think Orson Scott Card is like the George Lucas of authors. He's a fantastic "idea man" who can build wonderful worlds with compelling story lines... but he's incapable of writing believable human relationships. "The Lost Gate" features an Orson Scott Card staple -- a genius youngster with a gift for snappy banter. To Card's credit, he actually managed to have characters in this book with average, or below, intelligence as well, though they seem borderline cartoonish. I couldn't stand any one of Danny North's friends, and often found myself wondering why or how Danny was even friends with them in the first place. The easy answer is "they were friends because Card said they were in his text." But he never bothered to actually lay any groundwork in this regard. One moment they're strangers; the next they all say they care for each other and are carrying on like life-long chums. Much like Ender's Game and all related books, Card also manages to wiggle out from under having to portray a believable dynamic by creating an estranged relationship between Danny and his family. If you ever read Ender's Game, think back to Ender's relationship with his sister Valentine (supposedly the most important person in his life). Did their conversations ever give the vibe that they were particularly "close"? Nope. You could say that most of the times we saw them interact came after Ender was "damaged goods" and lost the ability to trust. That's fine -- except that seemingly sums up every single Card protagonist ever.

    The funny thing is though...despite all my griping, I did actually enjoy this book. I even went on to read the sequel, and am awaiting the final installment. The concept that drives the book (families of ancient gods still exist -- though in a weakened state -- and Danny holds the key for all these warring factions to regain their former power) is good enough to overcome Card's inability to make me feel anything of substance for his characters. Though perhaps that's because I knew to expect that going in...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2013

    Hijm

    Jywu

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    OK

    Good story line. Some adult content :(

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  • Posted February 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Magic filled adventure for YA and Adults

    Danny North is a young mage of 11 years of age, yet he is considered a drekka because he has shown no signs of using or having magic. Danny is a mage in a commune of the North mage clan where all are related and have been imprisoned here on our Earth for the last thirteen and a half centuries as the gates to Westil where locked and closed by Loki. And it's a given by all the warring families if any have a Gatemage they are to put them to death (with the thanks to Loki's trickster ways and closing the gates), yet secretly all the families hope for one to open the Great Gate back to their home land. Danny, unknowingly for years has been creating gates, and gets found out by the Greek girl. Danny is now on the run for his life, and needs to learn what he can from a world that knows nothing of making gates.

    I fear this was one of those books where the hype raised my expectations a little to high. As I enjoyed reading the book, it wasn't as out there as I had thought it would be. Orson has created a society where the people are from another world and full of magic, yet the magic is failing them and they are not as strong as they where when they where considered gods years ago. They are in need of the Great Gate to strengthen them once again, and to return to their home land. Yet they are exiled here on Earth.

    This book is the journey of Danny North to learning about drekka's, or normal people with no magic. Yet, Danny finds his way to other orphans of magic and to a wonderful home of people who take care of him and teach him what they can. What we have here is a young boy turning into a young man, learning what he can of what he can do magically, what are the good and bad things to do with his powers.

    Then we have another character we follow through the story. This character has lived within a tree for years, maybe centuries. Finally he births from the tree as a young boy, with no true memories of the past. He shows up in a town where he is taken in by a kitchen lead cook who realizes he has great powers. This is the character I actually enjoyed following the most. The mystery behind Wad, and the magical abilities he has, and the double life he lives in this wondrous home of the Kind and Queen.

    I think I would like to read the next book in this series when it comes out as to the curiosity it left in me. I'm curious as to why this families where exiled here in our world, what Wad will do now with what has happened to him, and what Danny will learn next and how to handle all the screaming inside him now. Will the families come after Danny or will he be safe in the future? I am curious.

    This book is a Young Adult read, and I think young boys will enjoy this read. I would say the book seems to be geared for young adults from about thirteen and older.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Gate to Adventure

    If you enjoy fantasy and the creation of new worlds of magic and myths you will enjoy this book. The author has the ability to draw us into his world and leave us believing in it's magic. The remnants of mages left over from the wars of a world populated by beings with near godlike powers survive on our world along side the ordinary human Drowthers. The only way into the old world, Westil, is by a magical gate formed by a gatemage. No such gate has existed for fourteen hundred years. Although almost all the mages have some sort of mystical or magical power, none claims the power of a gatemage. For all are sworn to kill any child who starts to show the skill of a gatemage. The balance of power between the surviving tribes of mages is preserved as long as none can pass through the gate to Westil. Whoever goes and returns will have strength and powers superior to all the others. Danny North, an otherwise unremarkable thirteen year old, is thrown into a vortex of intrigue and adventure when his unspectacular adolescence begins to develop into a gatemage of unbelievable power. Danny must flee for his life while trying to master the powers growing inside him. Will they be a curse or a gift? Will he be able to survive in this world while he tries to cross over into another world full of mystery? This book provided for review by the well read folks at TOR Books.

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