Customer Reviews for

Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them

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  • Posted October 26, 2008

    Lost at School. . . Wheather your an educator or a parent, this is a must read.

    Dr. Greene ideas are fresh and inviorating. In the education profession for 15 years, and parenting three special needs children, I was profoundly struck by this book. It addresses all types of challenging behaviors. Teachers learn to Collaboratively Problem Solve,(CPS), with students, parents, other teachers. I recommend this book for anyone who has difficulty knowing how to work with other people, regardless of their needs. Great book!! Thank you Dr. Greene

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 30, 2013

    Informative and Important

    Ross Greene hits the nail on the head with this book about how to interact with students who are not deliberately taught social skills and other academic skills that can lead to serious discipline problems. Dr. Greene understands children and teens and the issues they have with school and educators that just do not understand them.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2013

    A bit disappointing

    The ideas and techniques have been published before. The information and plan is good, but an entire school would have to read it, adhere to it, and work it with the families. Is this needed in the school? Absolutely! But would a school take the time to help children that fall through the cracks! Not that I have witnessed in over 20 years of working in schools. Parents need to step up and request this read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2013

    Surprised!

    I was really surprised by this book because it is engaging. A very interesting read.

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  • Posted August 28, 2012

    Reviewed by ONLY GOOD BOOKS: Every once in a while I come across

    Reviewed by ONLY GOOD BOOKS: Every once in a while I come across a book
    that I think every educator should read. LOST AT SCHOOL by Ross W.
    Greene is one of those books. The subtitle, Why Our Kids with
    Behavioral Challenges Are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help
    Them, promises a lot, and Greene delivers. According to Greene,
    contrary to what some adults might believe, students who find themselves
    frequently in trouble do not necessarily WANT to be in trouble (You’ve
    probably heard this one: “They just want the attention—any attention”).
    In fact, much like adults, children would rather be praised than
    punished. So it is not that they lack the desire to behave well. Nor
    do they fail to understand the rules. It’s this: they lack the skill.
    Or, in some cases, multiple skills—cognitive, emotional, and/or social.
    This is why typical school discipline systems don’t work for them:
    because these students don’t know HOW to do what we want them to do.
    While someone might say, “How hard is it not to push your classmates
    while standing in line?” for these students, it’s not so simple. There
    is more to their story. Greene argues that instead of punishing
    students for repeated infractions (making the same mistakes over and
    over), we should teach them how to behave properly (how to avoid the
    mistakes in the first place). Note that “teaching” in this case
    definitely does not mean “telling.” It is more complicated than that,
    which is why lecturing and cajoling often fail to change behavior (and
    more often than not, build resentment). Greene notes that most schools
    for discipline utilize what he calls “Plan A,” which is characterized by
    consequences and punishment (and sometimes rewards). At the other end
    of the spectrum, simply caving in to students’ demands would be “Plan
    C.” Greene offers his own alternative: “Plan B.” He describes a set of
    steps to engage behaviorally-challenged children in collaborative
    problem-solving, and he illustrates the process with several compelling,
    quite believable, case studies. The results are eye-opening. If you
    have time to read this book before going back to school, it could change
    how you deal with your most challenging students. In a really positive way.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    For teacher's, parent's, DCF personal & law enforcement or anyone dealing with behavioraly challenged children. This book provides detailed practical guidence & other tactics to help our challanged children not only in school which is critical for the well being of these children & all who are envolved in their lives.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2009

    If you're looking for an alternative way to work with behavior problem students then this book is for you.

    Great book to use for staff development. Helps educators think of alternative solutions to assist with behavior problem students. Provides clear examples and a framework for anyone to use Plan B.

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    Posted June 15, 2010

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