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Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story of Five American Airmen, a Doomed Plane, and the Will to Survive

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2011

    Pretty good book. You should read it

    Lost in Tibet was written by Richard Starks and Miriam Murcutt and is a thrilling adventure story about five American airmen; Crozier, McCallum, Spencer, Perram and Huffman, who lost their way while flying the Hump and crash-landed in Tibet. After barley parachuting out of their C-87 in time, they were stranded on the mountain top separated from each other and civilization. Only Crozier, McCallum, and Spencer regrouped. They desperately searched for their companions but had to call it off due to the freezing temperature, leaving Huffman and Perram stranded. Huffman had a broken arm and Perram was frostbitten when they finally caught up with the others at an unknown Tibetan village. They then traveled to Lhasa, the capital of Tibet. There, they were greeted by the Chinese envoy, Kung , the English delegate, George Sherriff, and a mob of extremely angry Tibetans. The Tibetans were angry because they had flown over the 14th Dali Lama, therefore putting themselves in a higher position then him. The Dali Lama was the god-king of Tibet and he was supposed to be the one who was above all else. They found themselves intertwined with Tibetan politics. The English delegate gets involved in negotiating with the Tibetans the Americans safe return to India.
    "The sand swirled around, dimming the sun like an eclipse. Crozier felt as if he were being buried alive. The airmen covered their faces, shielding their eyes. But still the sand blew, filling their throats so they found it almost impossible to breath."(Page 145) I believe that this is the crux because it shows the theme that nature is very wild and that you must persevere to get through it.
    The authors detail conveys his theme by making you feel like you are right there in the action and witnessing everything from freak storms to being disregarded and uncared for. Details like ".., they had been humbled by the generosity of a people who had so little yet gave so much" (page 147)makes you feel worthwhile. Although it may seem positive, it really has a strong felling of negativity. ".like a row of trapped birds."(Page 165) "Pointed like a dagger at the heart of neighboring Burma."(Page 2)These are all good examples of negativity in this book. He also used imagery to prove his point. But since this was a non-fiction book, his points would be easy to portray. So in all, the author portrays his theme by imagery and emotions.
    Some of the major themes are disregard for human life, to persevere, to have patience, the kindness of human kind, and that nature is difficult to live in. What I liked about this book was the adventure, the exhilarating usage of imagery, and the historical accuracy. The things that irked me were that it was negative, derogatory, and intertwined in politics. You should read this because it is a thrilling story of the survival of five American airmen in "Conan Doyle's lost world." (pg. 47)
    Rated 4/5.
    ****

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2011

    Pretty Good You should read it

    Lost in Tibet was written by Richard Starks and Miriam Murcutt and is a thrilling adventure story about five American airmen; Crozier, McCallum, Spencer, Perram and Huffman, who lost their way while flying the Hump and crash-landed in Tibet. After barley parachuting out of their C-87 in time, they were stranded on the mountain top separated from each other and civilization. Only Crozier, McCallum, and Spencer regrouped. They desperately searched for their companions but had to call it off due to the freezing temperature, leaving Huffman and Perram stranded. Huffman had a broken arm and Perram was frostbitten when they finally caught up with the others at an unknown Tibetan village. They then traveled to Lhasa, the capital of Tibet. There, they were greeted by the Chinese envoy, Kung , the English delegate, George Sherriff, and a mob of extremely angry Tibetans. The Tibetans were angry because they had flown over the 14th Dali Lama, therefore putting themselves in a higher position then him. The Dali Lama was the god-king of Tibet and he was supposed to be the one who was above all else. They found themselves intertwined with Tibetan politics. The English delegate gets involved in negotiating with the Tibetans the Americans safe return to India.

    "The sand swirled around, dimming the sun like an eclipse. Crozier felt as if he were being buried alive. The airmen covered their faces, shielding their eyes. But still the sand blew, filling their throats so they found it almost impossible to breath."(Page 145) I believe that this is the crux because it shows the theme that nature is very wild and that you must persevere to get through it.

    The authors detail conveys his theme by making you feel like you are right there in the action and witnessing everything from freak storms to being disregarded and uncared for. Details like ".., they had been humbled by the generosity of a people who had so little yet gave so much" (page 147)makes you feel worthwhile. Although it may seem positive, it really has a strong felling of negativity. ".like a row of trapped birds."(Page 165) "Pointed like a dagger at the heart of neighboring Burma."(Page 2)These are all good examples of negativity in this book. He also used imagery to prove his point. But since this was a non-fiction book, his points would be easy to portray. So in all, the author portrays his theme by imagery and emotions.

    Some of the major themes are disregard for human life, to persevere, to have patience, the kindness of human kind, and that nature is difficult to live in. What I liked about this book was the adventure, the exhilarating usage of imagery, and the historical accuracy. The things that irked me were that it was negative, derogatory, and intertwined in politics. You should read this because it is a thrilling story of the survival of five American airmen in "Conan Doyle's lost world." (pg. 47)

    Rated 4/5.

    ****

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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