Customer Reviews for

The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Great Book

The best of the best. A must read.

posted by 1381625 on May 23, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

...

It is interesting how we as human beings can change within no time or very little time.

posted by daaviid on February 24, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2009

    HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED?

    This is a great read for those who are wondering how a person could become one of the violent people in the newspaper. The thorough review of the Stanford Prison Study and its relation to everyday situations is very informative. The review of the events occurring in prisons today helps one consider whether prisons are useful. It will not provide the answer, but it will lead one to decisions on its own. It is not a read for the casual reader, but more professional or with a background in psychology.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Book

    The best of the best. A must read.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 7, 2011

    WELL PUT TOGERTHER UNDERSTANDABLE AND INFORMATIVE

    The LUCIFER EFFECT is a very informative book well understandable and a good read for anyone who wants to know how good people turn evil.I enjoyed the part about the experiment when Philip Zimbardo put together the jail and made ordinary young men into prisoners and guards,some parts I found to be humorous and serious and at the same time educational in the way how some of the guys fell into thier roles especially the guards.I found this book to be some of what I thought about how people change and more.What i also found fascinating is the change in people is not really a change per say it's actually allready thier the change is the the outside environment that you may find yourself into an in an environment that you've never experienced and this brings out what you never thought you would be capable of doing or not doing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 17, 2009

    The book was well written and informative.

    Zimbardo describes his Stanford prison experiment and then compares it with real life situations. The theories and methods used are discussed as well as similar experiments. The book was very helpful for my research paper.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    ...

    It is interesting how we as human beings can change within no time or very little time.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2007

    Zimbardo's 'Lucifer' is a Winner

    A page-turner, ¿can¿t put it down¿ book -- ¿The Lucifer Effect¿ HAS IT ALL! Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Psychology Professor Emeritus at Stanford University, identifies what can lead otherwise normal individuals to act in a cruel, evil manner. He gives you ¿behind the scenes,¿ running commentary and analysis of his famous Stanford Prison Experiment, along with what occurred at Abu Ghraib prison ¿ and the parallels are both frightening and captivating. Zimbardo satisfies any type of reader ¿ one who wants an in-depth analysis, as well as one who is curious how humanity can sink to such a low ¿ and he demonstrates how the situations in which we find ourselves can often impact our behavior and attitudes. All in an extremely and enjoyable style ¿ it¿s as if he¿s at your side, offering his ¿take¿ on these horrendous events and life itself. Fascinating stuff. And, miraculously, while these are real events, the book has all the SUSPENSE that one would desire from a novel, leading the reader to think -- a great read indeed. Adding to this, Dr. Zimbardo offers us hope in his assessment of how heroes can emerge by breaking free and resisting situational forces. A treat after visiting the dark side of humankind. A highly enjoyable and thought-provoking book, a journey with the advantage of Zimbardo¿s brilliant mind at its helm. Strongly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    I think that ┬┐The Lucifer Effect┬┐ by Philip Zimbardo is a must r

    I think that “The Lucifer Effect” by Philip Zimbardo is a must read for anyone who wants and insight into how people can change from a respectable person to someone who is evil or bordering evil. This may be a question you have asked yourself or not, but this book asks you to ask yourself if you are “capable of evil” [3 Zimbardo]. This can be a scary question but one worth asking. This question is one that we may not have asked ourselves if not for this book. I don’t think whoever wrote “ Zimbardo's 'Lucifer' is a Winner” could have said it better when he/she mentioned “ He gives you ¿behind the scenes,¿ running commentary and analysis of his famous Stanford Prison Experiment, along with what occurred at Abu Ghraib prison ¿ and the parallels are both frightening and captivating.”  [Anonymous] because this book gives you this amazing unique insight to what the real prisoners might have been feeling and what was actually documented in a “similar” environment.  This book is also great because of the amount of information Dr. Zimbardo gives in the preface and also in the footnotes that have corresponding info about journal entries and ect. While the commentary that goes along with the experiment really gives the reader a sense of perspective change that can change your thinking and how you interpret the book and experiment. For example I found myself sympathizing with the prisoners but being able to also hear about the guards really made not sympathize any less but it the guards more human. They became people and not just guards which you need to realize if you want to keep an open mind throughout the experiment especially during counts. One of the best parts of this book is how it makes you see yourself and your everyday actions in a new light.   I find that in this whole book one quote the Dr. Zimbardo didn’t even write himself stood out to me the most and I hope that it will have a lasting effect on my life because it changes the way you think of each of your daily actions.  “Evil is knowing better but doing worse.”  [Irving Sarnoff]

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2013

    Thought provoking

    I read this book when i was sixteen, it opened my eyes that the world isn't a totally innocent thing like i thought, it delves deeply into the psyche of being "evil". The study with the students is what caught my eye, i would definately tell someone interested to read this book. Although there is plenty graphic descriptions of death and other things that might make your stomach twist.

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  • Posted November 19, 2011

    Interesting but a difficult, dense read

    While the concept and the experiment itself are extremely interesting, Zimbardo's manifesto of the course of the experiment is dense, repetitive and clearly not meant to be marketed to readers outside the academic reading field. If you can stick through the chapter long explanations of what the next four chapters will be about, the content is worth struggling through. As someone who often reads academic papers and almost exclusively reads dense nonfiction, even I found it difficult to make the trek all the way until the end. Though, in the end, I was happy I read it I wish it hadn't been such a trial to make it there.

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  • Posted December 27, 2010

    a great read

    an intellectual and intriguing look at the causes of evil deeds and the circumstances that provoke them. I love this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    There Is Only One Word To Describe This...

    That word would be shocking. I sat through the first 200 pages amazed at the way that what should be normal decent people can degenerate into people that even they wouldn't recognize. This marks the second book that I have read that has amazed me by reflecting the possibility of the human character. The other book is "When God Stopped Keeping Score." Take a moment to check it out for yourself.

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  • Posted May 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Informative, However Monotonous and Flat

    In this book, Zimbardo discloses an arsenal of information that most of the population would be ignorant of, but a more studious reader would consider the latest in sociological research. However, that aside, the book begins by driving the point to home base, especially with the Stanford Prison Experiment, beating the dead horse at nearly every point afterward. Zimbardo clearly has the best intentions and some very unique ideas of heroism, but in presenting his opinions, he proves to be an incompetent writer, repeating his main idea annoyingly much and lacking an advanced vocabulary. Zimbardo succeeds in shining light on dirt under the rug, but he fails in keeping the reader engaged to the last page of the book; although, I'll never forget reading about the Stanford Prison Experiment.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2011

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    Posted January 13, 2010

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    Posted October 16, 2009

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    Posted April 8, 2011

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    Posted December 16, 2013

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    Posted April 3, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2011

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