Customer Reviews for

The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

Average Rating 4
( 34 )
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(7)

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(2)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Great Book

The best of the best. A must read.

posted by 1381625 on May 23, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

...

It is interesting how we as human beings can change within no time or very little time.

posted by daaviid on February 24, 2009

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  • Posted February 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    ...

    It is interesting how we as human beings can change within no time or very little time.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 19, 2011

    Interesting but a difficult, dense read

    While the concept and the experiment itself are extremely interesting, Zimbardo's manifesto of the course of the experiment is dense, repetitive and clearly not meant to be marketed to readers outside the academic reading field. If you can stick through the chapter long explanations of what the next four chapters will be about, the content is worth struggling through. As someone who often reads academic papers and almost exclusively reads dense nonfiction, even I found it difficult to make the trek all the way until the end. Though, in the end, I was happy I read it I wish it hadn't been such a trial to make it there.

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  • Posted May 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Informative, However Monotonous and Flat

    In this book, Zimbardo discloses an arsenal of information that most of the population would be ignorant of, but a more studious reader would consider the latest in sociological research. However, that aside, the book begins by driving the point to home base, especially with the Stanford Prison Experiment, beating the dead horse at nearly every point afterward. Zimbardo clearly has the best intentions and some very unique ideas of heroism, but in presenting his opinions, he proves to be an incompetent writer, repeating his main idea annoyingly much and lacking an advanced vocabulary. Zimbardo succeeds in shining light on dirt under the rug, but he fails in keeping the reader engaged to the last page of the book; although, I'll never forget reading about the Stanford Prison Experiment.

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    Posted February 12, 2012

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    Posted October 24, 2009

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    Posted July 4, 2009

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    Posted August 19, 2009

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