Customer Reviews for

The Lying Tongue

Average Rating 3
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2007

    Not worth the time

    This book isn't the worst I've attempted to read, but it's close. It sounds very intriguing, but it took over a week to get thru just a couple sections. It's too wordy and even skipping lengthy details doesn't help this book move along. I rarely give up on a book, but this one was torture.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2007

    Skip this book

    It's a book about a couple of twisted sicko psychopaths, with a very unsatisfying ending that left many loose ends dangling. The book offered no food for thought and no interesting ideas to ponder.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Lying Tongue

    Adam Woods has graduated from a university in England and with neither get a job nor a girlfriend to tie him down, he travels to Venice to tutor a sixteen year old boy in English. When he arrives his clients tell him they sent their son to New York City to avoid a scandal but they tell him that reclusive author Gordon Grace, who wrote one book that was a mega-seller, needs a companion and an aid.--------------- When he obtains the job, Grace tells him his duties and that he is not to spend most time away from the run down palazzo. Since he wants to write a book, he agrees to his employer¿s terms. As he gets to know his employer, he realizes he would make an excellent subject for a biography but the man refuses to spend time talking about his past. Adam starts investigating his life first in Venice and then in England where he learns salacious things about his employer. He has enough proof to blackmail the author into helping him write the biography but Adam doesn¿t know is that Gordon Grace is a sly and clever opponent playing with him as the subject, one that could turn deadly at any moment.------------- This is Andrew Wilson¿s first fiction novel and it is a masterpiece of Hitchcockian suspense mindful in some ways to the characters of Shaffer¿s play Sleuth. Neither Adam nor Gordon are likeable characters but the storyline is so compelling that readers are fascinated by the two amoral antagonists and the lengths they will go to order get what they want.-------------- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2006

    Lying Tongue

    Adam Woods has graduated from a university in England and with neither get a job nor a girlfriend to tie him down, he travels to Venice totutor a sixteen year old boy in English. When he arrives his clients tell him they sent their son to New York City to avoid a scandal but they tell him that reclusive author Gordon Grace, who wrote one book that was a mega-seller, needs a companion and an aid.----------- When he obtains the job, Grace tells him his duties and that he is not to spend most time away from the run down palazzo. Since he wants to write a book, he agrees to his employer¿s terms. As he gets to know his employer, he realizes he would make an excellent subject for a biography but the man refuses to spend time talking about his past. Adam starts investigating his life first in Venice and then in England where he learns salacious things about his employer. He has enough proof to blackmail the author into helping him write the biography but Adam doesn¿t know is that Gordon Grace is a sly and clever opponent playing with him as the subject, one that could turn deadly at any moment.------------- This is Andrew Nelson¿s first fiction novel and it is a masterpiece of Hitchcockian suspense mindful in some ways to the characters of Shaffer¿s play Sleuth. Neither Adam nor Gordon are likeable characters but the storyline is so compelling that readers are fascinated by the two amoral antagonists and the lengths they will go to order get what they want.----------- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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