Customer Reviews for

The Man in the High Castle

Average Rating 4
( 89 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(35)

4 Star

(22)

3 Star

(20)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Setting the Standard for the Genre

I don't like alternate history stories, dating back, I think, to when I was a kid and I read those stupid 'What If...' issues published by Marvel Comics. (You know, 'What If Peter Parker hadn't been bitten by the radioactive spider...,''What If Daredevil wasn't blind.....
I don't like alternate history stories, dating back, I think, to when I was a kid and I read those stupid 'What If...' issues published by Marvel Comics. (You know, 'What If Peter Parker hadn't been bitten by the radioactive spider...,''What If Daredevil wasn't blind...,''What If Wolverine shaved his sideburns...,' etc.) The Man in the High Castle, however, was excellent, setting the bar for the genre. The premise is intriguing: suppose an assassination attempt had claimed the life of FDR during his first term as president. As a result, America never fully recovered from the Great Depression, and was unable to arm herself sufficiently to turn the tide of WWII. As a result, the Axis powers were victorious, and occupied a divided United States after the war. Dick ties together his diverse cast of characters with a common fascination with 'The Grasshopper Lies Heavy,' an alternative history book that suggests the Allies would have won the war had FDR lived. Dick's central theme through most of his work has always been the nature of reality and perception, and this book is no exception. This is not a book to skim through for the major plot points -- the plot is actually the least compelling reason to read it. Savor the meditative and philosophical prose instead, and enjoy one of the genre's finest authors in his prime.

posted by Anonymous on October 27, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

This was one of the worse books I have ever read.  It made no se

This was one of the worse books I have ever read.  It made no sense, it was poorly written and pointless.  The concept was so good but the product was pointless and I was angry that I had wasted my time reading this.

posted by ascendant on May 1, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2006

    Setting the Standard for the Genre

    I don't like alternate history stories, dating back, I think, to when I was a kid and I read those stupid 'What If...' issues published by Marvel Comics. (You know, 'What If Peter Parker hadn't been bitten by the radioactive spider...,''What If Daredevil wasn't blind...,''What If Wolverine shaved his sideburns...,' etc.) The Man in the High Castle, however, was excellent, setting the bar for the genre. The premise is intriguing: suppose an assassination attempt had claimed the life of FDR during his first term as president. As a result, America never fully recovered from the Great Depression, and was unable to arm herself sufficiently to turn the tide of WWII. As a result, the Axis powers were victorious, and occupied a divided United States after the war. Dick ties together his diverse cast of characters with a common fascination with 'The Grasshopper Lies Heavy,' an alternative history book that suggests the Allies would have won the war had FDR lived. Dick's central theme through most of his work has always been the nature of reality and perception, and this book is no exception. This is not a book to skim through for the major plot points -- the plot is actually the least compelling reason to read it. Savor the meditative and philosophical prose instead, and enjoy one of the genre's finest authors in his prime.

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    the man in the high castle is a life changing read

    There are books out there that don't just challenge the reader, there are books that change the reader.

    The man in the high castle, by philip k dick is one of those books. This book, like all of dick's writing, is revolutionary. It is challenging. It is completely and utterly bizzare. It is unique, difficult, simple, readable, entertaining, schizophrenic and so much more than any set of adjectives can covey.

    This book is not about the plot. It's about what the plot means. The plot, like all of dick's novels, is cohesive and interesting and detailed. It is fully realized and detailed; it is completely authentic. In this world, the axis wins WW 2. The world that results is a world where Japan and Germany have divided the world in two, with the United States serving the role of Germany after our version of WW2. Japan dominates the west coast while Germany lords over the east. Apparently the heartland of America had nothing to offer to either side.

    Jokes aside (especially bad jokes), this novel is an utterly amazing and philosophical exploration of the impact of morality on each and every choice. It uses the chaos of the plot to accentuate the moral decisions made by each character. In fact the chaos of the world this novel takes place in works as a sort of synecdoche for each person and each person's choices. The whole world is difficult, and each event impacts a web of other events. The world and it's events mirror each individual person, they stand in the place of each individual person. The plot unfolds through the narration of five people, ranging in importance from a low level worker to an important German politician. Each person makes choices, and each choice has a moral consequence.

    read the full review at http://tickleishpickle.blogspot.com/2009/07/man-in-high-castle-is-life-changing.html

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2012

    Read it and think!

    Great book! Not too many books actually make you think anymore. This is classic Dick, a throughly original and deeply philosophical novel that makes you question what or whodetermines fate. I feel more enlightened having read this.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Another Philip K. Dick Classic

    Philip K. Dick is a master of unconventional sci-fi and fantasy genre, and those qualities are clearly exhibited in this work. It is set in 1960s America in a world in which Germany and Japan have won the World War II. US and the rest of the world are divided between those two superpowers, and we follow lives of several ordinary Americans who try to adjust themselves to this reality. The characters in the novel are fully developed in a manner that we've come to expect from Dick's later novels. Their personal struggles are intertwined with the new geopolitical power plays. The title of the novel refers to the sobriquet for Hawthorne Abendsen, a fictional writer of the book "The Grasshopper Lies Heavy" which forms a story-within-a-story and a sort of MacGuffin for this novel. This fictional book will also be at the center of the denouement of this novel, and may provide the clue for what this novel was all about.

    The Man in the High Castle is another brilliant and thought provoking novel. It is an engrossing and fun read as well, and a true classic of science fiction.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2013

    2 things for everybody

    1. Tickleishpickle and tunguz use way too big words.
    2. The authors name is hilarious (hilarious doesn't cut it as big word).

    1 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2001

    Excellent work

    The first time I read this book I didn't really think it was that great. I liked it but I was a little bit confused by it, and I didn't think it measured up to other works by Dick like Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? However, I recently re-read it after recieving it as a birthday present, and I must say that it makes much more sense the second time through. I noticed glimpses of Dick's genius that had slipped by me before and finally understood everything that was going on. Not only is the premise extremely interesting, but I also like how it doesn't just get bogged down in the geo-political implications of an Axis victory, but deals more with actual people who live in this strange and different world. At times shocking at others just silly it is a great read that doesn't really require too much thinking, but rather provokes thought on the part of the reader.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2000

    What if....

    In 1938 (or there about, there was an attempt to kill FDR during his run for re-election), what if he *had* been killed? Only Philip K. Dick (who won the Hugo Award for SF that year for this novel) could answer this question in so intriguing a way. (A short film called 'The High Castle' was made based on it). Enjoy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    Philip K. Dick¿s The Man in the High Castle describes the possib

    Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle describes the possible societies that would have developed if Japan and Nazi Germany had won World War II. The two countries have established puppet governments in the United States and have entered a Cold War. We are able to see through the eyes of the main characters that are each living in different places in the U.S. and how these governments treat their newly conquered citizens.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2013

    Someone

    *Sets in a chair, facing away and waiting.*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    Brilliant

    This work is more than revisionist fiction. It's a mind bending sci-fi, fantasy tale that serves as allegory as much as it does entertainment. It comments on itself within the pages in an incredibly intelligent way. This should serve as an inspiration to writers. Challenge everything you know about writing. Push the edges and form a new horizon. Brilliant.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2013

    Excellent

    Intoxicating

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2012

    Excelent novel

    Great read nice background my new favourite book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    Loved it!

    Like so many other novels and short stories, PKD leads you into a world of great imagination

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2012

    Yo MaMmA

    Yo MaMmA iS tOo CeReBrAl FoR tOdAyS aUdIeNcEs

    0 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2005

    Well Worth The Read

    So much has been written about this book, I'll keep this brief. The effect of this story creeps up on you, weeks after you finish reading it. Dick was arguably the best SF writer during the thirty years (1952-1982) of his writing career he wrote his share of bad novels, but he also produced more great novels and outright masterpieces (of which this is one) than any writer since H.G. Wells. Critical examinations of his life and work are plentiful--and justified. His main theme, an examination of the nature and meaning of reality, is one of nearly endless possibilities through the movements, interactions (and non-interactions) of his characters, you are treated to thought -provoking scenarios that have you asking the questions: What is real? Is it the phony made-up anchorman telling me the slanted news story? Is it the president telling me 'We have an exit stategy'? Does the way I feel about an event or a person or an inanimate object define its reality, or is it something independent of me that defines it? Dick explored various permutations of these questions in all his novels. In this book the characters are memorable, the connections between them (sometimes tenuous, sometimes direct) are brillianty formulated, and Dick's handling of the multi-strand narrative is miraculous. It is a book that rewards the careful reader, and keeps you thinking long after you've read it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2001

    Reading this book is like counting to infinity.

    I rarely read books more than once, but the two books I've read by Dick, TMitHC and 'The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch,' I've already read twice, and at some point, I'll go back for more. TMitHC is a total mind-blow--intriguing, horrifying, thought-provoking, even heartening at times in a world overcome by evil. The fact that Dick wrote this book with the I Ching adds another level of wonder; the fact that Dick basically included himself in the book blurs reality inside and outside the book. The nakedness of 'our' world and the world in the novel challenges the reader to question how reality is created and really makes a body think about the concept that it's the victors who write history.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2