Customer Reviews for

Marcelo in the Real World

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Marcelo

I don't even know how to write this review. This book blew me away in so many different ways. Marcelo is smart - super smart - actually, he just doesn't come off that way since it takes him ten times as long as anyone else to process anything - verbal or nonverbal commu...
I don't even know how to write this review. This book blew me away in so many different ways. Marcelo is smart - super smart - actually, he just doesn't come off that way since it takes him ten times as long as anyone else to process anything - verbal or nonverbal communication. He is happy to spend his summer working with the ponies at his school for disabled children until his father, who has never believed there is anything wrong with Marcelo, insists he take a job in the mail room at his law firm in order to become part of the 'real world'. Marcelo is convinced that he will be better off caring for his ponies but agrees to the arrangement. But Marcelo doesn't count on the unlikely friendship that forms between himself and his co-worker Jasmine and the unsettling interest the son of his father's partner, Wendell, shows in him either. Least of all, Marcelo doesn't expect or understand his reaction to the startling picture he finds of a young girl and his desire to help her.

I was so often reminded of "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" since both boys like their order and routines, but Marcelo is able to interact with others on a much higher level and brought out more genuine responses than Christopher ever could. The biggest revelation to me was Marcelo's growth, just as his mother predicts, which pervades everything that happens throughout the book. As deep and serious as many of the topics in this book were, I still found it to be hilarious. Marcelo's tendency to literally define every expression to come his way competely endearing and just dang funny. Particularly when he became stumped by some slang term thrown around at the office. And since this book was obviously written by a male author who knows how to write about other men without creating caricatures, one particular scene with some old farmers had me cracking up to no end.

There is so much going on in this book with the underlying theme of music and religion that it was almost too much to take in during one sitting but I couldn't seem to tear myself away.

seemichelleread.blogspot.com

posted by SeeMichelleRead on June 1, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Marshmallow, I love you.

It's not really a three, but wasn't quite a four.

Seventeen year old Marcelo Sandoval is different. He hears music no one else can hear, his social development is stumped, and his special interests include religion, classical music, and therapy ponies. Marcelo is lo...
It's not really a three, but wasn't quite a four.

Seventeen year old Marcelo Sandoval is different. He hears music no one else can hear, his social development is stumped, and his special interests include religion, classical music, and therapy ponies. Marcelo is looking forward to a summer of working as a stable boy at Paterson, a school for kids with special needs, when his father tells him that he must get out of his comfort zone and join the "real world" or else he won't be able to go to Paterson for his senior year. The real world in this case is his father's law firm's mailroom where Marcelo will have to learn how to get along with Jasmine, his beautiful and quirky boss, complete tasks on time, and wade the truth out of all the corporate muck.

I was a tad disappointed in this book. It wasn't Marcelo. I loved him. I could read books in his voice all the time and never get sick of it. It's blunt, but honest and insightful. Marcelo was a great character, and the topic of autsim didn't deter me either. I was quite excited to see how he would survive in an average person's reality. I also liked Jasmine and Arturo, as well as Marcelo's fluctuating relationships with them. I didn't like Wendell, but I wasn't supposed to. He was the designated douche.

What I really didn't like was practically the entire middle part which consisted of the "legal thriller". There was nothing thrilling about it. It was dull, and I found the discussions, both internal and external, to be dull too. I just felt that out of all the paths that this book could have taken, why this one? I would have rather liked to see it spent more on Jasmine and Marcelo's stay in Vermont, or with the Rabbi or something. I just didn't like that part.

Marcelo was a great character though, and overall the book was a worth-while experience. I recommend it to anyone looking to get into the head of an autistic kid.

Oh, and the author's name is epic. Francisco X. Stork? Sounds like a James Bond character. I really hope it isn't a pseudonym.

posted by Awesomeness1 on July 31, 2010

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  • Posted June 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Marcelo

    I don't even know how to write this review. This book blew me away in so many different ways. Marcelo is smart - super smart - actually, he just doesn't come off that way since it takes him ten times as long as anyone else to process anything - verbal or nonverbal communication. He is happy to spend his summer working with the ponies at his school for disabled children until his father, who has never believed there is anything wrong with Marcelo, insists he take a job in the mail room at his law firm in order to become part of the 'real world'. Marcelo is convinced that he will be better off caring for his ponies but agrees to the arrangement. But Marcelo doesn't count on the unlikely friendship that forms between himself and his co-worker Jasmine and the unsettling interest the son of his father's partner, Wendell, shows in him either. Least of all, Marcelo doesn't expect or understand his reaction to the startling picture he finds of a young girl and his desire to help her.

    I was so often reminded of "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" since both boys like their order and routines, but Marcelo is able to interact with others on a much higher level and brought out more genuine responses than Christopher ever could. The biggest revelation to me was Marcelo's growth, just as his mother predicts, which pervades everything that happens throughout the book. As deep and serious as many of the topics in this book were, I still found it to be hilarious. Marcelo's tendency to literally define every expression to come his way competely endearing and just dang funny. Particularly when he became stumped by some slang term thrown around at the office. And since this book was obviously written by a male author who knows how to write about other men without creating caricatures, one particular scene with some old farmers had me cracking up to no end.

    There is so much going on in this book with the underlying theme of music and religion that it was almost too much to take in during one sitting but I couldn't seem to tear myself away.

    seemichelleread.blogspot.com

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Sarah Bean the Green Bean Teen Queen for TeensReadToo.com

    Marcelo is seventeen and has an Asperger's-like condition. He goes to a special school and has a summer job lined up caring for the therapy horses at his school. But Marcelo's father has other plans - he wants Marcelo to experience the real world.

    He gets Marcelo a job working in the mail room of his law firm. Marcelo isn't interested in working at the law firm, but his father makes him a deal - survive in the real world and he won't have to go to the public high school his father would like him to attend for his senior year.

    While working at the firm, Marcelo uncovers secrets, experiences friendship, fights a battle for justice, and learns about the real world.

    I was first drawn to this book because of Marcelo - I was interested in reading a book written from the perspective of a character with Asperger's. I thought it would be a story about Marcelo navigating the real world, but there was so much more. Marcelo finds himself faced with tough decisions, and fighting a battle between what's right and wrong, and I think anyone can relate to his struggles. There's some mystery, some romance, and even some religious searching all packed in these pages.

    Marcelo hears internal music and music is a connection for Marcelo and Jasmine, his co-worker in the mail room. This novel is beautifully written and there were times I could hear the music in Marcelo's words. I also enjoyed the fact that the book is written in first person from Marcelo's point of view. It was interesting to get inside Marcelo's head and understand how he processed things.

    Jasmine is an inspiration. She's patient, she's kind, and she's smart. We could all hope to be like Jasmine, especially when dealing with people who are "different."

    If you want to see the real world through new eyes, be sure to pick up a copy of MARCELO IN THE REAL WORLD.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2014

    Awesome book

    This book was required to read this past semester. I appreciate my teacher picking such an awesome book! Being inside the mind of someone that is trying to grasp the "real world" when he is already a part of it, made me feel frustrated for Marcelo. It is a very interesting book. Recommend it to anyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2012

    A Sweet Story

    Marcelo's father makes him leave his dream summer job to work in his law firm. He entices him to work by promisting that if he works the summer and does a good job that he can go back to his old school and not have to attend the public school. Marcelo realizes that the real world is much tougher and decisions must be made that could change everyone's life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Really Good!!!!

    I really liked it. The characters were really well developed and I especially liked how the author portrayed Marcello's disability.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2011

    Gotta read it for school

    I have to read the book for school! Is it good?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Very Well Written

    This book is great for people that want to get into the mind of someone with autism.

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  • Posted March 6, 2011

    Marcelo in the Real World

    This was a very interesting book. It was because I liked reading from Marcelo's point of view. I loved how he saw things and how he thought through everything. Overall, this was just absolutely amazing.

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  • Posted May 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    My reality is not your reality, nor should it be.

    I really liked the story of Marcelo having to leave the comfort of his special school, as well as many of the interests that made him him. I could understand where his father was coming from, and sympathize, but felt that his ultimatum was highly unfair. Yes, Marcelo learned to cope, and it might have been good for him, but it was a risky proposition, thrusting him into the "real world" without many of the crutches on which he relied.
    I kind of feel that Arturo had it coming to him. There were always going to be repercussions, and Marcelo would not be the only one who would have to pay the price. The Xtel thing was unexpected, but made for a more interesting, richer story.
    I listened to the audiobook. The narrator was good with the deliberate pacing of Marcelo's speech and thought processes, but there were many times when, due to the way the Marcelo speaks in the third person, I couldn't tell if he was thinking or speaking, until someone responded.

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    Posted July 20, 2009

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