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Mary Boleyn: The Mistress of Kings

Average Rating 4
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(16)

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(6)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

This is a terrific biography of a woman who was the older sister to one of the merry wives of King Henry VIII

This is a terrific biography of a woman who was the older sister to one of the merry wives of King Henry VIII and mistress to her brother-in-law and his rival across the Channel King Francois I of France. Allison Weir asserts with a logical argument that the romanticiz...
This is a terrific biography of a woman who was the older sister to one of the merry wives of King Henry VIII and mistress to her brother-in-law and his rival across the Channel King Francois I of France. Allison Weir asserts with a logical argument that the romanticized novels and the papal commentary of Mary Boleyn as a whore is false. Instead, she was an intelligent woman who went with the flow realizing her choices were limited. Her first husband William Carey was extremely influential at Henry's court and would most likely never settle for a whoring spouse. Her second husband commoner William Stafford also from an influential family with ties to the king had no reason to settle on a whoring widow who was older than him and was mother to two small children. Instead Ms. Weir believes Mary had no say in whether she would be The Mistress of Kings. The historian also argues against the belief that her subject's two children were sired by Henry as at least her son (Henry) was the offspring of William. Finally she debunks the so called heroic redemption of Mary interceding with her lover the king to save her sister's life as a myth with no substantial support; a survivor Mary would know most likely she would join Anne in the Tower awaiting execution. Born most likely in 1498 and dead forty-five years later, she was a product of the Tudor era. Inductive reasoning shows a lack of supportive documents from those friendly or neutral towards the Boleyn family condemning her. Only enemies of her or her family call her a whore. This is a strong look at a woman surviving the men in her life, but unable to speak out agonist the false portrayal of her as a "great and infamous whore". Alison Weir champions a more plausible fairer assessment.

Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on September 18, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Mary Boleyn - A speculative biography

Alison Weir, certainly one of our most prolific biographers of late Medieval England; has perhaps overreached herself with this biography of Mary Boleyn. Thanks to the novels of Phillipa Gregory and the attendant film she is now slightly more than a sideline to history....
Alison Weir, certainly one of our most prolific biographers of late Medieval England; has perhaps overreached herself with this biography of Mary Boleyn. Thanks to the novels of Phillipa Gregory and the attendant film she is now slightly more than a sideline to history. But the truth is, that is all she is. And unfortunately Weirs biography "Mary Boleyn; Mistress of Kings" confirms that. This is a lady who had a brief moment in history and then spent the rest of her life in a fairly contented obscurity. Married below her station (the second time, the first was to a popular nobleman) she did not come to court, had little contact with her sister, and apparently recieved no benefits from briefly being the mistress of not one but two kings. Weir's biography is full of references of where she might have lived, what she might have done, and who she might have known. By about the the third or fourth chapter, the truth is that you don't really care. One realizes that the reason that she faded into the background was that she was essentially boring. I will admit that the research is impressive and prodigious, but nothing concrete seems to come from it. I found the same problem with her book about Kathryn Swynford (a far more interesting person), there was just not enough information to make a solid biography.

posted by Paris182 on October 26, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2012

    Question

    Hoe many pages is this?

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted May 28, 2012

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    Posted October 24, 2011

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    Posted September 16, 2011

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    Posted January 30, 2013

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