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Mayor of Casterbridge (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 4
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted January 30, 2013

    Here there be spoilers!

    I hate when I'm torn by a book. Part of me loved the story because of the characters, the location, and everything they went through. Another part of me hated the story because of the characters and everything that they went through. For example, Michael Henchard. He certainly didn't make it easy for a person to like or root for him. He was ill-tempered, ungrateful, quick to accuse and even quicker to blame. He sold his wife and infant daughter off in a drunken fit, and then had the audacity to be angry at Susan the next day (after he sobered up) for taking his auction of her seriously and running off with Newson. He behaves like a petulant child throughout the majority of the book, constantly blaming others for his failures, hoping for redemption without ever trying to redeem himself in their eyes. Susan Henchard was a minor character, but one that had a fairly large impact on the story. She hoped for much, lied about a lot, and then - rather inconveniently, I'm afraid - died and left Elizabeth-Jane and Michael in a state of confusion. I'd like to add my confusion as to Susan's desire to see Elizabeth married to Farfrae to the mix, as well. She alluded to Elizabeth that she needed to marry Donald at some point, but we never found out why. That's kind of annoying. And the secret that she revealed in her deathbed letter to Michael! I never saw that one coming. Elizabeth-Jane was the one character to escape my scorn and frustration, though she did not come out unscathed. I don't know how she was able to repress her feelings for so many years, especially when she watched Donald go loping off after Lucetta, knowing that he had, not too long ago, all but given his heart to her. Elizabeth was the very embodiment of patience and understanding, with a strong will and determination to make herself better. She was bit gullible (not nearly as much as her mother, though), but she was still likable for it. I, of course, was rooting for her happiness, even though it looked for a long time like it was never going to happen. Donald annoyed me because of his casting-off of Elizabeth-Jane for Lucetta. Lucetta, in turn, annoyed me for chasing after Donald, even though she knew that Elizabeth had a fancy for him. That the two of them could completely forget the facts and retreat into a world of their own creating, all while ignoring Elizabeth's discomfort and heartache, was astounding to me. That Elizabeth chose to put on a happy face and carry on as if nothing was amiss was even more surprising. Or, maybe not. When I look back at how she handled herself from the minute she was introduced, I guess her choices weren't so surprising. She was a selfless soul, eager for others to be happy, and able to amuse herself by watching their doings. Elizabeth-Jane definitely was the character I cared about most. There was a tiny bit of redemption for Michael at the very end, when we find that Henchard had an impact on at least one person (Abel), but I think it was too little, too late. There were more than a few instances where I drew parallels to a Shakespeare drama, owing to the many challenges the characters had to live through. The dramas weren't incredibly unbelievable (except, maybe for the premise of Susan being sold to Newson), but they were stiff enough to have the characters grow, or fold under the pressures. All in all, it was an entertaining story. There are just a few questions that remain unanswered, and I felt like the ending

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  • Posted April 9, 2012

    Though I expected sadness and misery, I was hoping for some

    Though I expected sadness and misery, I was hoping for something more profound at the ending than "Happiness was but the occasional episode in a general drama of pain."

    This is a many chaptered narrative that shows how the results of good intentioned-or-not mistakes can lead to personal ruin. The reader also will lose all respect for the main character.

    A problem with Victorian Period literary giants I have is their long sentences. I counted one at 82 words.

    Would only recommend this to someone who likes a challenging read (big words and colloquial language) and who doesn't mind a depressing, predictable story.

    "The sun was resting on the hill like a drop of blood on an eyelid." Best line.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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