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Meet You in Hell: Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and the Bitter Partnership That Transformed America

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  • Posted February 9, 2009

    Good background

    Excellent book for putting into context two of the 'robber barons' of the late 19th-early 20th centuries. Sets these two industrial giants in the proper context of their era. Also puts a human face on both sides of the infamous Homestead Strike of 1892. Not for a casual, 'escape' kind of reading (i.e. not a beach book!) but ideal for those who want a better understanding of both Carnegie and Frick and their times.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2007

    Carnegie vs Frick...Homestead 1892

    Standiford sets out to tell the tale of the two great 'robber barons' in Carnegie and Frick. Using the great Homestead Strike of 1892 as the background he builds a story of intrigue and greed that symbolizes the Gilded Age in American history. The rags to riches stories of both Carnegie and Frick would seem to endear one to the other. Yet, there seems to be an ever growing dislike of the other throughout the events Standiford chronicles here in 'Meet You in Hell.' Using various sources from Carnegie's own autobiography to the more recent work by David McCullough's 'The Jamestown Flood' Standiford paints a picture of the dismay towards management held by labor during the period. He also weaves in the philanthropy of these men as is, and was, the norm to vaildate their greed at all costs industrialism. Standiford also points to a modern industrialist who uses the same union breaking principles and rock bottom pricing, all the while paying minimum wage as 'a national retail behemoth...(who)comes to Everytown and annihilates the local mom and pop establishments.' A valid argument comparing the strategies of Sam Walton to those of Carnegie and Frick. A must read for the fan of the Gilded Age who is intrigued by Carnegies and Fricks love/hate relationship in business and in life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2005

    Easy money in hard times

    Although the topic may appear to be dry and geared toward history buffs it is actually a quick read that gives an insight into the blood sweat and lives of the people that built this country. The fortunate were VERY fortunate as this story of Carnegie and Frick points out. They accumulated amazing wealth with little regard for those that generated it for them. Should be required reading for business majors and history students.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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