Customer Reviews for

A Meeting at Corvallis (Emberverse Series #3)

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 46 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted February 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    DYNAMITE

    The second book of the series, ¿The Protector¿s War¿, wasn¿t about the war at all, but only the events leading up to it. It moved the series along but was a bit slower paced than the first book of the series, ¿Dies the Fire¿. This book is as good as the first. It is all about the Protector¿s War with the Bearkillers, Clan Mackenzie, the Mount Angel Monastery and sundry allies on one side and Lord Protector Norman Arminger¿s Portland Protective Association forces on the other side. <BR/><BR/>We are introduced to other characters that become important to the story. The English contingent of the Lorings and John Hordle are firmly established. Arminger¿s consort, Lady Sandra, proves to be more cunning and calculating than he is. The formidable Tiphaine Rutherton claims to be evil like Lady Sandra but often does the right thing even if it also the practical thing to do. We also see the development and linkage of the Portland Protective Association heir, Lady Mathilda and the Clan Mackenzie heir, Rudi. <BR/><BR/>Two different concepts of government are opposed reminiscent of the battle between capitalism and communism. The governments and practices of the Bearkillers, Clan Mackenzie, the Mount Angel Monastery and Corvallis University do not look the same but they all rely on the will of the governed, individual initiative and freedom. On the other hand, Arminger¿s feudal model of government, like the Nazism of Hitler, depends on creating an empire of the free and privileged few living on the slave labor of the conquered. Also like Hitler, Arminger¿s strategy is based on his superior numbers, assumed superior technology and his blitzkrieg attack. There are two phases of this war, and the second phase builds to a dynamic and surprising conclusion. This is a great book in a great series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2006

    This book epitomizes the reason to read Stirling!

    The third book in the 'Dies The Fire' series brings everything together in an action packed finale that leaves you hoping that this series is not a mere trilogy. After the disappointing second novel in the series, 'The Protectors War' it was as if Stirling awakened and fed his readers the nonstop thrills that we have come to admire. One detailed battle followed another leaving the reader barely a chance to catch his or her breath. Great read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2006

    Buy this one now!!

    A Meeting at Corvallis is a definite 'buy now' book. It is the last in the Dies the Fire trilogy and is even more exciting than the second book, The Protector's War. In this novel, we see the events leading up to and the exciting conclusion of the war between the Ptotectorate, and the Bearkillers, The Mackenzies, the Monks of Mt. Angel and the volunteer group from Corvallis. Exciting, intersting and extremely well written are the words which come to mind in considering what to put in this review. The trilogy deals with the survivors and the societies they develop after 'The Change' in which all explosives, electricity, and artificial power, such as jet engines, steam engines and internal combustion engines suddenly cease to function. Muscle, water and wind form the sources of power, much as would have been the case before the invention of these devices. The descriptions of the various groups, their coping mechanisms and the development of the characters are far better than I have seen in any other books dealing with post apocalyptic scenarios. Buy this book and the other two in the trilogy now. You won't be sorry!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2006

    Definitely worth reading!

    The trilogy begun in Dies the Fire and continued in The Protector's War concludes here, though the author is already working on a second trilogy (to be set twelve years later). Norman Arminger's neofeudal 'Portland Protective Association' is finally starting the long-promised war Mike Havel's 'Bearkillers,' Juniper Mackenzies clan of Wiccans and the monks of Mount Angel are standing firmly against them, but the faculty ruling the city-state of Corvallis are still refusing to dedigitate. Who will win? With this author, it's not truly a guarantee that the good guys will come out on top.... Well-written fight scenes (ranging from single combat, through small-unit actions, up to full-scale battles involving several thousand soldiers) abound, as do equally well-written descriptive passages showing the author's excellent eye for detail, be it scenic, architectural, or other. All of the old characters (or at least, those who survived the first two books) are back, and new character Tiphaine Rutherton is one of my favourites from the whole series. This is Stirling's best thus far, with promise of more to come. Go, read, enjoy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2006

    Another Triumph for S.M. Stirling

    'A Meeting At Corvallis' is another triumph for the author, S. M. Stirling. This series started with 'Dies The Fire', was followed by The 'Protector's War' and now the trilogy is complete with 'A meeting At Corvallis'. The story is set ten years after a world wide change occurred, rendering the internal combustion engine, the steam engine, electricity and explosives non functional. A number of communities developed in Oregon and the story concerns three major communities with several others in less prominent roles in the story. The Bearkillers and their allies, the Mackenzies, plus a faction of the residents of Corvallis, as well as the monks in Mt.Angel are attacked by the Protectorate, a feudal society ruled by a 'Lord Protector' in Portland. This, the last of the three novels of the trilogy, deals with the final battle and a surprising outcome. Throughout all three books, the communities, the leaders and a number of more minor characters are developed to a most interesting degree. We can clearly see how even the 'evil' Lord Protector thinks and reasons. Without a doubt, the trilogy as a whole and this book in particular, are the best I have ever read on this subject.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2006

    An exciting end to the trilogy

    A Meeting At Corvallis marks the final chapter in the first trilogy started by Stirling's Dies the Fire. Fans of the earlier books as well as the Island in the Sea of Time trilogy will love it. The forces of the Protectorate and the free nations of Oregon are marshalled and prepared for battle -- the only question is, who will emerge victorious? The forces of freedom or those of tyrany? I look forward to even more books set in the world of the Change to come!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 22, 2012

    Loved it!

    Recommend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2011

    Wheres The Protectors War?

    Love the series, but it'd be nice if B&N could at least put book 2 on here.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Bravo!

    If the climax of this novel doesn't bring tears to your eyes, you have no soul.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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